#1
I'm getting conflicting information from teh interwebs. Half of it says that vintage tone is darker, muddier and deeper, etc, whereas the other half says its brighter because vintage pickups have less windings therefore have more highs.

(I'm asking because I want to replace the bridge pickup in my jazz bass and a lot of pickups are simply described as either 'modern' or 'vintage' and its really unhelpful.)
Last edited by Spaz91 at Apr 4, 2011,
#2
Quote by Spaz91
I'm getting conflicting information from teh interwebs. Half of it says that vintage tone is darker, muddier and deeper, etc, whereas the other half says its brighter because vintage pickups have less windings therefore have more highs.


I tend to think of it as the darker, warmer tone.


Case in point... i just replaced the SD Quarter Pounder P pup on my P bass with a '62 RI pup... and it is, in fact, darker and warmer


I've always associated the highs and/or scooped mids, with modern tone.
"Punk Rock should mean freedom, liking and accepting anything that you like, as sloppy as you want, as long as it's good and has passion."
#3
JPJ's tone on Ramble on. Bad Company Feel like making Love.

Jammerson.

I prefer the modern clank myself a la Burton, Harris, Chancellor, Trujillo.
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1981 Fender Lead I Seymour Duncan humbucker, Mesa BoogieIIIRectifer, MKIIRhodes,PRS
#4
I thought you were answering a question to jeopardy for a second here.... But in all seriousness I feel like the vintage tone, at least to myself, is going to be more on the passive side and with some serious growl.
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My Gear:

Fender American Standard Precision
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LTD EC-100
Peavey Rage 158
#6
I think it's a case of whole band dynamics. early 50's-early 70's guitars remained in the trebley middy spectrum, and the bass sat above the bass drum, as a warm thump. Over time, guitars got heavier and bassier digging into the bass spectrum, and now we have a heavy "clank" tone of round wound strings, and a mid emphasis.

In the end, it's about the band dynamic, and how much you want to stand out, and how you play. Vintage thump can stand out, look at Paul McCartney for example, you hear him clear as day, but if he was in say Mastadon you wouldn't "hear" him, but you could appreciate the meat his tone brings to the sound. Likewise, if you play like Lemmy, in a Beatle cover band, it would be cutting and weird.
#7
So if I wanted a pickup that had a more tight and defined low end (like your mother) rather than frequency consuming boom, would I go for vintage or modern.
#8
personally, i would associate modern tone with the dirty, crunchy, tight sound with more attack and vintage tone with the dark, warm, thumpier sound.

so I would say go with modern if you want defined low end.
My Setup:
Fender Aerodyne Jazz Bass,
Fender USA Jazz Bass
Hartke LH1000,
Hartke Hydrive 410,
Sansamp BDDI,
Electro-harmonix Black Finger Compressor.
Last edited by jackers1234 at Apr 4, 2011,
#9
Quote by Spaz91
So if I wanted a pickup that had a more tight and defined low end (like your mother) rather than frequency consuming boom, would I go for vintage or modern.


One thing I've always associated with a vintage sound is a more boomy/indistinct low end, rather than a tight and defined one, so I suspect the right kind of modern pup would be more up your street.
#10
Honestly, the amp is the most serious part of your sound, even your tone knob on your bass does more. The pickup is important, but at the end of the day, a good amp, and a good grasp of EQ, and the pickup becomes largely transparent.
#11
If you are up for non name brand, I'd try one of the GFS brand Pups, they have a vintage and modern pup, you could buy both for less than the duncan or fender
#12
Jazz/Precision with flatwounds.

Tone, halfway to 3/4s off.

Done.
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#13
Quote by Spaz91
So if I wanted a pickup that had a more tight and defined low end (like your mother) rather than frequency consuming boom, would I go for vintage or modern.

I laughed way too hard at that.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#14
Quote by Spaz91
So if I wanted a pickup that had a more tight and defined low end (like your mother) rather than frequency consuming boom, would I go for vintage or modern.



Jazz/precision Flats

And...A bit of high-action
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1981 Fender Lead I Seymour Duncan humbucker, Mesa BoogieIIIRectifer, MKIIRhodes,PRS
#16
I would say a classic rock tone is punchy and less bass-y, ala entwhistle, or anyone through an SVT

But for a vintage tone, can't go past flats and a Jazz / Precision ala jamerson
#17
Vintage tone is big,warm and not always definable.
In the days before full range P.A's,a bassist had to really crank his amp.This resulted in power-amp distortion,both tube and solid state.The other important feature was speaker overdrive.This combination gave a great warmth and cut the definition of the note distinctly,hence this is where the warm,thumpy sound came from.
I personally find a neck humbucker and a guitar tube amp into a big bass cabinet to the be best way to achieve a great vintage sound that works in the modern context.
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#18
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9J8-xmbfBWc

Quote by Ian hawkins
Vintage tone is big,warm and not always definable.
In the days before full range P.A's,a bassist had to really crank his amp.This resulted in power-amp distortion,both tube and solid state.The other important feature was speaker overdrive.This combination gave a great warmth and cut the definition of the note distinctly,hence this is where the warm,thumpy sound came from.
I personally find a neck humbucker and a guitar tube amp into a big bass cabinet to the be best way to achieve a great vintage sound that works in the modern context.
That's a good definition, for both guitar and bass. It's warm and fuzzy (high on the mids), rather than bright and defined (generally the scooped mids). Of course classic rock bassists often used a brighter, clankier tone and modern bassists often use a warmer tone, but when you think of the quintessential tones, modern is more on the clear, tight end and vintage tone is fuzzier and looser.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Apr 5, 2011,