#2
Chord Progression.

I is the base chord.
Ie if a song is in the key of C, I would be a C chord.
The no's are chords in the key.
II would be D
IIb would be between C and D ie C#
III would be E
IV would be F
etc
Caps are major
Small are minor.
I think.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at Apr 4, 2011,
#3
caps shouldn't matter. In the key of C the 2nd,3rd, and 6th are always minor and the 7th is always diminished.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
#4
I'm pretty sure he's right about the uppercase major, lowercase minor. True, naturally in the key the chord degrees have tonality but that doesn't mean they can't be changed with accidentals. Apparently way back in the day, musicians were given a key and the chord numerals instead of each individual chord. So that was their method of notating accidentals.
#5
Yeah they represent different chords in a progression. Read this it will help a lot! www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/songwriting__lyrics/writing_original_and_interesting_chord_progressions_part_i.html
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#6
Quote by GS LEAD 5
IIb would be between C and D ie C#

The b or # comes before the chord.
Quote by shikkaka
caps shouldn't matter. In the key of C the 2nd,3rd, and 6th are always minor and the 7th is always diminished.

Only if you only ever use diatonic chords. For example, if you wanted to play C - Em - F, then you would write I - iii - IV; but if you wanted C - E - F (the E major providing more of a pull to the F), you would write I - III - IV.
Last edited by blue_strat at Apr 4, 2011,
#7
Quote by GS LEAD 5

IIb would be between C and D ie C#
.


C# would be #I. Same thing, just spelled differently
#8
Quote by mado-elodie
I-IV-V7; V7-I; ii-V7-I .... and i think that there is others like that XD



I-IV-V7 represents a chord progression in a Major key. The 1st chord is built off the tonic...
(the I/one chord).... the next chord is built from the 4th scale degree (the iv/four chord).... and the 3rd chord is build from the 5th scale degree (the V/five chord)

the 7 after the V (V7) indicates that the chord also includes the 7th.

Same concept with the other 2 progressions you listed.


Do you know how to harmonize the Major scale?
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#9
It means you need to (what Ive told you repeatedly) start your background in learning diatonic harmony.

I'm going to keep posting this unless some kind soul wants to take it upon themselves to personally teach you. Your difficulties come from having no foundation. If others want to fill in that hole, let them.

I think the real value come from you doing your own work, and taking the initiative to invest in the process and learn, but if people wanna hand you fish and support you, that's fine with me, ultimately you'll end up with a lot of movement and no forward progress.

I fully expect you to be here in 6 months lost as ever, but ignorance is a choice.

Good luck with that,

Sean
#10
Quote by shikkaka
caps shouldn't matter. In the key of C the 2nd,3rd, and 6th are always minor and the 7th is always diminished.



no. the 3rd is only minor if its a minor key. and if it is its the 2nd thats diminished not the 7th. thinkin aeolian. starting on the 6th. yes the 6th is minor (if major) and so is the 2nd. but if its Cminor is i iidim....etc its axactly I ii III IV V vi viidim I but starting on the vi
#12
Quote by theguitarplayin
no. the 3rd is only minor if its a minor key. and if it is its the 2nd thats diminished not the 7th. thinkin aeolian. starting on the 6th. yes the 6th is minor (if major) and so is the 2nd. but if its Cminor is i iidim....etc its axactly I ii III IV V vi viidim I but starting on the vi



We're talking about functional harmony here.

In a major key, chord I, IV and V are major and the rest are minor except for chord vii which is diminished.

The reverse happens in a minor key.
#13
Quote by XianXiuHong
We're talking about functional harmony here.

In a major key, chord I, IV and V are major and the rest are minor except for chord vii which is diminished.

The reverse happens in a minor key.

almost reverses. ii in Major becomes ii* (diminished) in minor.
Quote by theguitarplayin

no. the 3rd is only minor if its a minor key. and if it is its the 2nd thats diminished not the 7th. thinkin aeolian. starting on the 6th. yes the 6th is minor (if major) and so is the 2nd. but if its Cminor is i iidim....etc its axactly I ii III IV V vi viidim I but starting on the vi

you're wrong. Notating using roman numerals its a way of showing ALL chords in a key, not just the diatonic ones. Here is a good example. I IV V in A minor, using your point, means A minor D minor E minor. Sure thats accepted, but how do you write Emaj? the major V, which is very often substituted in minor keys, wouldnt be able to be written. Lowercase numerals show the Minor chords, Lowercase numerals with a degree mark, are listed as diminished. Youll see it on these forums as ii*, because the degree mark isnt readily available. Major chords are uppercase, such as I, VII, etc. and Augmented are represented with uppercase, and the + sign, such as V+.

Using it like this, you can figure the chords out. I ii iii IV V vi vii* are the diatonic chords of major. Notice its Maj min min maj maj min dim, dictated by the fact that majors are capitalized, and minors aren't.

These numbers are all based off the major scale. So in minor, you need to add the accidentals. Minor would be i ii* bIII (not just III, its a flat third, rather than the major third of major) iv v bVI bVII.

TS, its just how to show chords based off of your key. I IV V7 is the major tonic, the key note. IV is the 4th note, and V is the major 5 chord. The 7 shows that its a Dominant 7th, it pulls back to the tonic better than just a Major V chord
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