#1
damn

i've got no issues bending. i can bend a half tone or whole tone up. if i need to i can ossilate between both of them, but i can't do anything fast like yngwie malmsteen.
my goal is to be able to do stuff like him but not be a replica. the problem is i have no idea how to practice to get it faster. i heard use guitar weight, but to get aggressive intense vibratos i need to be able to train fast

i dont know if i should be using wrist or fingers. i use wrist but i just can't go fast with it. when i do fingers for speed i find i end up not having the strength to be able to maintain a half tone bend... it weakens and goes to 1/4 tone which sucks
tell me how you would practice vibrato. saying something like 'constantly doing bends' is totally useless man. im talking about something like:
'try the bends you like, start bending slowly and increase bpm over time. makes uer you use only wrist and minimal pressure'
#2
I have no experience to answer your question because I'm a newbie, but didn't you just answer yourself?
#3
build up strength in your fingers to be able to bend up more.

but do whatevers comfortable for you, you'll naturally get better in time. trust me. you won't notice it, but video yourself now, then watch it again in 6 months time, you'll look back on it and laugh, trust me.
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#4
try the bends you like, start bending slowly and increase bpm over time. makes uer you use only wrist and minimal pressure
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#5
Quote by Dempsey68
video yourself now, then watch it again in 6 months time, you'll look back on it and laugh, trust me.



i record audio of myself playing every few weeks and looking back i cant believe how terrible i used to be
#6
Dont bend or do vibrato with your fingers. Use your wrist. It may feel awkward at first but before you know it you will be doing it automaticly
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#7
Quote by Mr.Feather
try the bends you like, start bending slowly and increase bpm over time. makes uer you use only wrist and minimal pressure


0/10 for troll attempt... when you try you gotta put more effort in
#8
There are so many different ways to do vibrato, so what ever works for your hands is best, as long as its not too big of a vibe
#9
Use the wrist-not fingers!
Practice getting your vibrato in-time with the metronome. Start off slow (60Bpm) and do quarter notes-strictly in time. Move it up to 8th notes, 16ths...all the while keeping it in time. It really pays to work on your slow, wide vibrato. Sounds very expressive too
Also, it's cool that you're aiming for an Malmsteen type vibrato, but check out other players. Try and match your vibrato to theirs and also listen to how vocalists use vibrato!
#10
Quote by TheChosen1One
0/10 for troll attempt... when you try you gotta put more effort in


Actually there's nothing wrong with that method at all. If you can keep control of your vibrato to a specific beat and actually consciously control the speed and depth of what you're doing that's a bloody good thing.
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#11
Rotation of wrist. I just play pretty much every phrase with vibrato to be honest, so I've never actually had the need to practice it separately. My advice is to just get into the habit of vibratoing the last note of every phrase or something simple like that.
#12
Lately I've been practicing vibrato and tremolo at the same time, like vibrato at 1/8 notes and whammy at 1/4 or 1/2 notes and very subtle. Sounds amazing on long sustained notes.
#13
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Actually there's nothing wrong with that method at all. If you can keep control of your vibrato to a specific beat and actually consciously control the speed and depth of what you're doing that's a bloody good thing.


While I agree with your notion, he didn't actually mean it. He just copy pasta'd a line from my OP, which gives him 0/10.
#14
I've found doing vibrato REALLY slowly in circular motions seems to work well. I think because doing it slow requires a good amount of wrist strength. Which makes me think that any kind of bending routine might do the trick as well. I think it all comes down to controlling the strings and being able to manhandle them when necessary. If you got control, you can do whatever vibrato you want.
#15
You're probably 'overthinking' it, technical practice should only take up about 25% of your practice time. The rest should be all about developing your ear so you can make a pure connection from what you hear in your head to what you can play on guitar. That's what really counts.
#16
Quote by LennyB
You're probably 'overthinking' it, technical practice should only take up about 25% of your practice time. The rest should be all about developing your ear so you can make a pure connection from what you hear in your head to what you can play on guitar. That's what really counts.


I find that people tend to be skewed toward one extreme or the other: technique focused, or sound focused. If you can't do both at the same time, it might be useful to alternate between the two. Focus on nailing the technique, but then after you're decent at that, start paying attention to what you sound like.