#2
Listened through my stereo.
Good,interesting ideas :-) Love the clean guitar and the strings sound wonderful, what
vst is that ? Personally I do not like the drums at all, but I'm old school.
The guitarsolo sounds quite thin, but again,I'm old school.Classy vibrato btw.
Can be a great track with some adjustments I think !
Last edited by Damocles at Apr 5, 2011,
#3
Other than the clean guitar at the beginning, which imo is too trebly, it sounds good!

Also, I understand that your drum sound is limited to what software you have, but there is a plugin called EZDrummer, where you can basically import a midi and make it sound pretty realistic. You also have full mix controls on the drums, which means you can lower the volume and change the pan of each individual drum on whatever kit you have loaded.

I use it and I can get this kind of sound with it:
www.reverbnation.com/unfoldingtheabstract

Another REALLY useful thing is to up the volume on the bass track, and then put a post filter on all of the rhythm guitars at about 120-180Hz to give some room to the bass. After that push the EQ on the bass up about 3-5dB around 200Hz and you can really make it pop out and give the track a nice bottom end to compliment the highs. Depending on how much you want the bass to stand out, just move the EQ boost down from 200Hz until you like the sound.

The BEST thing you can do with a mix is dedicate a range of Hz completely to each instrument. The guitars could take over the 180-250 range, while the bass has the 100-200 range. The other instruments can usually be stacked over these two and sound fairly decent without any adjustment, so mess with those as necessary. (I.E. strings/drums) It's good to boost the entire kit a few dB at a range of about 50-100Hz to make the kick drum pop more. Adjust the dB as needed on that one.

After you separate each track into its own dedicated range of Hz, adjust the volume/EQ until there's little to no clipping. After that you can master it however you want/have someone master it for you.

A good thing to keep in mind is that since you have each instrument in its own frequency range, you can adjust the frequencies in the mastering stage and make an instrument sound louder or quieter if you need to. You can literally make the bass vibrate walls without any clipping happening from it! =D

Best.technique.evar.

Anyways I hope that helped. I'm anything but a pro, but I have a few tricks up my sleeve now and then.

You're music sounds really cool, and I hope you continue writing/recording it!
#4
Damo,
yes haha i used uhh, fruityloops strings, and i agree completely with the drums something i always seem to struggle with lol, probably just gonna re-track the guitars again and make a new drum set cause these samples are shit.

Mb
thank for for telling me. =] about EZ
and thank you again for sharing your mix tips ill give it a try right now. and thanx =], ill let u know how it goes x]
#5
Quote by Freak44
Damo,
yes haha i used uhh, fruityloops strings, and i agree completely with the drums something i always seem to struggle with lol, probably just gonna re-track the guitars again and make a new drum set cause these samples are shit.

Mb
thank for for telling me. =] about EZ
and thank you again for sharing your mix tips ill give it a try right now. and thanx =], ill let u know how it goes x]



No problem! A couple more things I forgot to mention. If you want a smoother bass sound, put a post filter on the bass and drop the treble ALL the way. If you want a punchy bass sound, do the same thing, and then duplicate the track and keep one of them with treble up and the other with treble cut out.

Also for strings, there a program called Edirol Orchestral that sounds amazing. I've used it quite a bit with great results. All of these things cost money, but they are well worth it if you can afford it! =)