#1
everyone keeps saying 'well practice writing music first', how exactly do you do that?

do you just sit down and hash out progressions after progressions until you hit something you like?
do you tweak notes until it sounds new?

because if that's the case don't you need technique to play those?
if so then doesnt technique because a priority before making music in almost all cases?

how much time do you set aside to this?


it really feels like the sum of the parts > whole when youre in a band. some riffs ive made end up just working well when playing live... but it doesn't sound as good when im practicing. ive even had cases where ive got an awesome riff that is sort of downgraded in a band environment. usually a solid riff sounds ****ing awesome in a band setting, but i've had rare cases where it just goes the other way.
#3
What helps me is to put a series of limits on myself, like playing composing in an atypical time signature or trying to do something really strange, like modulate a progression so I can resolve to the original progression's tritone. That forces you to be really creative about what you're doing and makes you look at the music less as patterns and more like a sandbox with which you can do almost anything.
#4
do you just sit down and hash out progressions after progressions until you hit something you like?
do you tweak notes until it sounds new?

because if that's the case don't you need technique to play those?
if so then doesnt technique because a priority before making music in almost all cases?


Well, music is the goal and technique is the means. The goal is the top priority, obviously, but you need enough technique to get going.

But if you can play open chords then you should be writing music - and there's tons of different ways to approach it.

Personally, I get really inspired by visual art and I find myself understanding the "feeling" of the art - then creating the same feeling through music if I can.

Another good thing to do is to sit down, and try and imagine a cool riff or solo... then figure it out. Good for ears, hands and imagination!

it really feels like the sum of the parts > whole when youre in a band.


Absolutely - get used to imagining drums and bass!
#5
Some composers can't play any part of their music, so you don't need technique to write. Though obviously if you want to play it yourself...

The way I practice writing music is to churn out full pieces, no matter if it sounds crappy, or has lame transitions. As you said, some of your riffs sounds better in a band setting: then write out the full parts and practice that. Over time you'll develop those skills and the ability to hear where you want your music to go. That's what works for me at least.
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#6
If you want to write songs, many ways can be used to do that.
Trying some random stuff could help, just by accident you can find out an amazing riff or song or something.
Combine by trying out play wha you already got and hear if it sounds nice with something different, if not go for the higher or lower notes whatever you want the song to switch to.
And you dont have to make it hard or complex if you start writing songs, you will develop your own finest style eventually.
Think before you start can also help a lot, if you want a darker sounding song or a brighter sounding song Focus on that.
I think it is easier to first write the riffs and such and write lyrics as last, that way you can make the lyrics have the right timing and fit ins on the rhythm, cause it is a bit hard to make riffs fit in on the rhythm of the words.
If you can't seem to write one awesome song but you can make multiple songs who are acceptable good enough for yourself but Could be better, try combining the best parts all together.
Hope this helped you.
And keep playing from the heart.
"The Demon Code prevents me from Declining a rock-off Challenge"

-Satan.
#7
I like to take a small riff or part of a song I really like and jam with it and change it up for a while. You never have to use what you make up but for me it gets me used to writing my owns parts to songs.