#1
So i saw a post about a week ago and looked EVERYWHERE for it! And I couldn't find it.

There was a Music Theory book that a few people recommended and I was gonna buy it but now its nowhere to be found. for some reason i wanna say it was "Complete Idiot's Guide to Music Theory" but i could be WAYYYYYYY off.

Anyone might know?

Im also looking into

"The Everything Music Theory Book" (Any opinions on this book?

Suggestions are also welcomed

Thanks!

Im a theory noob Fyi
#2
not sure about overall theory but i bought a great book a few weeks ago on scales and modes called "Scales & Modes: In the Beginning: by ron middlebrook and its helped me a lit with my theory and obviously with my scales and modes
#3
That's what it is. Check amazon? It's on there.

Tonal Harmony with an Introduction to 20th century by Koska or something is FANTASTIC though. It's what I use in my college course and I plan to keep it forever.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#4
Quote by Artemis Entreri
That's what it is. Check amazon? It's on there.

Tonal Harmony with an Introduction to 20th century by Koska or something is FANTASTIC though. It's what I use in my college course and I plan to keep it forever.



Oh haha i was right. Ive seen a few cheap ones on amazon. I'll check into your book also. Thanks!
#6
The book I see making a frequent appearance in threads like these is "Music Theory for Dummies".

Currently I'm reviewing a theory book called Chord Scale Theory and Linear Harmony, and may post a review in the future on it. I do a lot of reviews, most I never share on UG.

Sean
#8
I remember a thread recently that mentioned The Guitar Handbook by Ralph Denyer not sure what you're referring too I just remember that thread so thought I'd throw it out there.
Si
#11
Get Harmony and Theory from Musician's Institute. Very comprehensive, well laid out and because it's a workbook, it forces you to think and apply everything you learn in order to answer the questions.

I also have the Idiot's Guide to Music Theory and while it explains everything in very simple, easy-to-grasp explanations, it's easier to forget what you learn from it because the book itself doesn't make you apply it as much as the Harmony and Theory book.

Or do what I did and get them both on Amazon for cheap!
#12
a book a few people try to pedal (mainly me!) is walter piston's Harmony. it's a very good book but it's coming at it for a classical end, nothing to do with guitar whatsoever, but it does give you a very good grounding in most of the harmony your ever likely to find. good book if you want to seriously learn theory, if your looking at just progressing a bit theory wise, i'd say maybe give it a miss
#13
^Agreed. I've only worked through the first 4 chapters or so, but so far it's a superb text. The first three chapters on rudiments are almost worth the price of admission because they're so clearly explained. But yeah, it's not for the faint of heart when it comes to theory. There are probably better books out there for really simple understanding and I've heard good things about Idiot's Guide.
#14
Sorry to "bump" this thread, but are those books for music theory in general or applied for guitar?

I need a theory book for guitar that explains things like: how chords are made, chord progressions, keys, scales, modes, and other guitar stuff.

I am a beginner and i know some chords but don't know where they come from.
#15
Quote by GuitarLogic
Sorry to "bump" this thread, but are those books for music theory in general or applied for guitar?

I need a theory book for guitar that explains things like: how chords are made, chord progressions, keys, scales, modes, and other guitar stuff.

I am a beginner and i know some chords but don't know where they come from.



It might help if you know the fretboard and you learn some theory as you go.

In my experience two of the major problems that guitar players face is not knowing where notes are on the fretboard (I will link a video to help with that) and not knowing how to read standard notation.

If you know where the notes are and how to read, basic theory, like triadic harmony, is a breeze.

Have a look at this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ci6aTve_fAU and look at this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Staff_(music)

Just memorize for now -- find some simple music to play via standard notation (throw away the tabs) and harmony will come much more easily than the alphabet soup of rote memorization of chord grips and names.

William Leavitt's Modern Method for Guitar from Berklee Press is the go to book on getting this stuff under your fingers and into your head.

In my opinion, anyway.