#1
My Seagull Entourage had a spill that left it with an (strangely) almost bullet shaped hole in the bottom of the body. The material taken out within the blemish is still there, just a little set back. See pic below...



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The sound is basically the same. But I'd obviously like to repair it. Any tips? Is this something I can do, or should I take it in?

Thanks in advance!
Last edited by duffmc81 at Apr 5, 2011,
#2
It was destined to have an output jack there?

Anyway, if you do it wrong it would be hard to fix so you could take it in or try and smooth the hole a bit and fit(precisely) a piece of wood in there. I am not entirely sure about what glue/adhesive to use though, but I have seen a bad patch job before and it looks bad.
#3
yeah you could either patch it up or buy an acousic pick up and make tht your output jack

i would os ue thta as an excuse to but a pick up on that
#5
Hardware stores sell a wood filler. It's like a paste... then you let it dry, then sand it smooth. Good luck matching colors though. I think the jack idea would be perfect
#6
I'd honestly go with the output jack idea.

Wood filler is a horrible, horrible monstrosity that should be avoided at all costs. Any repair tech who uses wood filler to repair a hole is a dangerous retard who should be shot on sight.

The correct way to repair this would be to round the hole, cut a matching cherry plug, orient it correctly, do whatever blending is necessary around the edges by hand (often involving painting in false grain extension stripes to blend the plug), refinish the area to match, then level with the surrounding area using micromesh pads.

However, I would not consider an Entourage to be worth the effort. You might as well just turn it into an output jack.

Just please, please don't use woodfiller. It's a mess and has the same effect as a rubber mute. Stay away from that crap.
Sincerely, Chad.
Quote by LP Addict
LP doesnt have to stand for les paul.. it can stand for.... lesbian porn.
#7
Quote by Chad48309
Any repair tech who uses wood filler to repair a hole is a dangerous retard who should be shot on sight.


this
#8
it sounds fine, the hole isn't in a place that shows when you play the guitar. i'd say leave it alone. patching it correctly would be very careful work, and probably require not only buying the wood and the right glue, but also the tools. or cost at least half the value of the guitar or more.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#9
I agree. You would want to remove the damaged wood and smooth the edges so that cracks don't develop. Making a patch that wouldn't be as unsightly as the hole itself would be very expensive.
Tell folks it's a bullet hole!
#10
I think I'm going to go with the jack idea. I've kind of wanted to plug this thing in sometimes. It's nice enough where I wouldn't mind investing in that feature, but not nice enough for me to risk doing some crazy stuff just to fix the hole. Like I said it sounds no different.

Thanks for the advice!
#11
That happened to me, too! The dent on my guitar was just slightly bigger, though.

What I did is went to my guitar tech. He told me that it wasn't really worth patching and whatnot. So, I went out and bought some duct-tape that was almost the same color, then I stuffed the hole with as much cotton ball material as possible, and then taped over it. You can't really notice it, it soundproofed the whole, and it works like a charm.
#12
You were trying to have sex with it, weren't you...


But seriously, the output jack idea sounds like the best option..
#14
Ok. Pick-up purchased. Woot.

The circumference of the output jack is just a hair smaller than the hole itself. So a bit of a problem there. It sits in there, but it's loose.

Would it be okay if I just got a little bracket like you see on many electrics (something like this), installed that, and just cleaned up the hole with some wood filler? Or is there a better way to do that?
Last edited by duffmc81 at May 7, 2011,