#1
quick question, I'll give you as much info as possible to make it make sense.

for the purpose of this discussion, I'll be using the most common pentatonic shape to make things easier. this one:

Starting on the fifth fret
5-8
5-7
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-8

Now, up until this point, I've always used this scale to solo in Am or C; either or. to the best of my knowledge, the only difference between the Am pentatonic and the C Major pentatonic is where you start and resolve; the notes are exactly the same. would I be correct in saying this?

also, I was jamming with some friends, and an Amajor 12 bar blues jam came up. naturally, we played A - D - E as the main chords. BUT I was told to solo in the same scale I have listed above. I was confused because I always thought that the Cmajor/Aminor pentatonic can only be used in, well, C major and A Minor! can anyone shed some light on this topic for me?
XBL Gamertag: CashMoney54
#2
for 12 bar blues, you generally use the minor pentatonic, so A-D-E is actually Am-Dm-Em. So you might be thinking of the A blues scale, which is what you put, but with an added b5th in it.
#3
Quote by CashMoney54
quick question, I'll give you as much info as possible to make it make sense.

for the purpose of this discussion, I'll be using the most common pentatonic shape to make things easier. this one:

Starting on the fifth fret
5-8
5-7
5-7
5-7
5-8
5-8

Now, up until this point, I've always used this scale to solo in Am or C; either or. to the best of my knowledge, the only difference between the Am pentatonic and the C Major pentatonic is where you start and resolve; the notes are exactly the same. would I be correct in saying this?

also, I was jamming with some friends, and an Amajor 12 bar blues jam came up. naturally, we played A - D - E as the main chords. BUT I was told to solo in the same scale I have listed above. I was confused because I always thought that the Cmajor/Aminor pentatonic can only be used in, well, C major and A Minor! can anyone shed some light on this topic for me?


C major and A minor are RELATIVE keys. Meaning they have the same collection of notes ordered differently. So you are correct with your C major/A minor. This works with any key. G major/ E minor, D major/B minor. Etc. They're 3 semi tones apart.

As for your jam. A major and A minor are NOT the same key. They are PARALLEL keys, meaning they contain the same root note but different collections of pitches. There are three accidentals between any parallel keys. A major has 3 sharps, A minor none. D major 2 sharps, D minor 1 flat. This is less apparent in the pentatonic and more in true major/minor keys but the point stands.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#5
This question pops up a lot (regarding the use of the minor pentatonic to solo over a blues progression. here is a short answer, basic blues chords are dom7 chords these chords are unstable chords wanting to resolved, because of this nature of the dom7 chords alteration extensions can be added to the chords these will be #5, b5, #9 b9 13 etc. the minor pentatonic targets these extensions of the dominant chords for example in the key of A, the first chord will be A7 the second note of the A minor pentatonic it the #9 of the chord, the same goes to the D7 but the targeted tensions are different and so on.

A nice tool is to switch from the mixolydian scale of each chord/or from each of the chord tones to the A minor pentatonic which makes some interesting lines
#6
Quote by jayx124
This question pops up a lot (regarding the use of the minor pentatonic to solo over a blues progression. here is a short answer, basic blues chords are dom7 chords these chords are unstable chords wanting to resolved, because of this nature of the dom7 chords alteration extensions can be added to the chords these will be #5, b5, #9 b9 13 etc. the minor pentatonic targets these extensions of the dominant chords for example in the key of A, the first chord will be A7 the second note of the A minor pentatonic it the #9 of the chord, the same goes to the D7 but the targeted tensions are different and so on.

A nice tool is to switch from the mixolydian scale of each chord/or from each of the chord tones to the A minor pentatonic which makes some interesting lines
I've never looked at it that way, but it makes so much sense. Thanks for posting, I just learned something.
Si
#7
Quote by exos308
for 12 bar blues, you generally use the minor pentatonic, so A-D-E is actually Am-Dm-Em. So you might be thinking of the A blues scale, which is what you put, but with an added b5th in it.


Actually the 12-bar blues usually goes A7 - D7 - E7. The pentatonic basically functions as the major scale with accidentals.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
Just to clarify what everyone else has said, you were play the "blues scale" Which is essentially the minor scale (A minor in this case) but it is played over minor (to get minor blues sound) or major chord progressions. The blues scale also contains a flat 5 as someone else said, so the pattern would change to this
E-5--8
B-5--8
G-5--7-8
D-5--7
A-5-6-7
E-5--8

EDIT: I just realised you typed yours differently, I'm guessing typo. Reply back if it isn't and I've misunderstood. Hope it helps though
Blog Of Awesome UGers.
Quote by OddOneOut
I seem to attract girls.
Which is annoying, cos I'm a girl and I like cock.

Quote by IRISH_PUNK13
Being an idiot should be illegal too.
#9
Quote by AlanHB
Actually the 12-bar blues usually goes A7 - D7 - E7.
Yep, and the reason the minor pentatonic works over these chords is that the notes are all either a 1 or a b7 of one of these chords. A and G are in A7, D and C are in D7, and E and D are in E7. This gives you A C D E G, A minor pentatonic.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
at first glance it looks like ur being overloaded with info from every1 here. in blues and some rock, the notes of the minor or major pentatonic scale will both work over a minor or major chord progression, so Aminor will work over Amajor to some extent. i tend to not even think about scales anymore when i play this style of music, although i start with a similar box shape:
5-8
5-6-7
5-6-7
5-6-7
5-8
5-8
and then i spread across the fretboard from there and go nuts. in this kinda style i don't think much about theory, i just think "yeah i've seen blues/rock guys do this before, it'll work out fine" and then do it. i do suggest you begin learning theory if you haven't already though, and get out of the pentatonic-box-shape rut you may be in, start using the full major scale, get into some other styles, etc.