#1
Holy hell kill it with fire!

In this thread, we find material related to non-newtonian fluid, and stand in awe at it's ridiculous tendencies.

I don't get how corn starch and water can do this.
"The future's uncertain, and The End is always near."
-Jim Morrison
#2
I do. But then, I'm a fluid dynamicist.

Good implications, though - think about filling bulletproof vests with this stuff. The fluid hardens on impact, relaxes enough to allow mobility under normal operation.
#3
Quote by SlinkyBlue
I don't get how corn starch and water can do this.


Here's the secret;

I think it's a non-newtonian fluid.
Quote by Moggan13



FUCK YEAH GHERKIN PALS!!



Yeah, I use a Squier Strat.
#4
WOW that was awesome sauce
- THIS IS MY SIG -
BEHOLD ITS AWESOMENESS
#5
Quote by DecaPodge
Here's the secret;

I think it's a non-newtonian fluid.


"The future's uncertain, and The End is always near."
-Jim Morrison
#10
Quote by Boysie8
[pretentious asshole] To be more accurate, it's a dilatant (which is a type of non-Newtonian fluid), meaning the viscosity increases with shear rate [/pretentious asshole]

Sorry, the engineer in me had to speak out.


Which can be modelled using the Power Law Fluid model where its viscosity is related to the shear rate by

viscosity=K|shear-rate|^(n-1) where n>1

Sorry, the mathematician in me had to speak out
#13
Quote by LordBishek
You boys enjoy your non-newtonian wanking. I'll be over here working with a REAL fluid - air


Gas turbines FTW!

well not really...but well you know.
The content of this signature is pretty much irrelevant
#14
Quote by rock.freak667
Gas turbines FTW!

well not really...but well you know.


No, no - don't you be afraid. You put your hands up in the air and scream support for gas turbines*. Me, I love my turbofans.


___________________________________________________________________
* But only air breathers. If I catch you talking up some shit like steam, I will kill you in your face.
#15
Quote by LordBishek
I do. But then, I'm a fluid dynamicist.


That's interesting. I read this book on Chaos, and it talks a lot about fluid dynamics.
#16
Quote by severed-metal
That's interesting. I read this book on Chaos, and it talks a lot about fluid dynamics.


Let me guess: turbulence, right?
#17
Quote by severed-metal
That's interesting. I read this book on Chaos, and it talks a lot about fluid dynamics.

Jurassic Park?
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#18
Jurassic Park?

I had no understanding of chaotic events happening, nor do I understand the implications of fluid dynamics throughout it.

Quote by LordBishek
Let me guess: turbulence, right?


The book or the air?

No to the former, and yes to the latter. There was quite a bit about turbulence, more about the flows of rivers (Pardon the ignorance, I've only read one book that semi-touched on fluid dynamics), and most of it praised scientists like James Yorke, Steven Smale, Mitchell Feigenbaum and Benoit Mandelbrot (Fractal work).


You're referring to the Jan Mark children's novel?

Because I do not read children's books. Except for Captain Underpants due its link with romanticism and self hate.
#20
No, I meant the fluidic phenomenon. I haven't even heard of the damn book. Its just that we observe a lot of chaotic behaviour in turbulence modelling which we have to account for.
#21
Quote by LordBishek
Good implications, though - think about filling bulletproof vests with this stuff.

Sounds like it would be super heavy.
#22
Quote by severed-metal
Jurassic Park?


(Dat ass)
Quote by Fat Lard
Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

Quote by captainsnazz
brot pls
#23
Quote by RU Experienced?
Sounds like it would be super heavy.


Depends, if they just carried around bags of fluid strapped to themselves, yes, probably. Not to mention that when impacted, the container would probably break, and then once the fluid returned to ground state it would flow out of the hole .

No, they'd have to put it in some kind of solid matrix of some kind, maybe look at integrating it with kevlar or something.