#3
Kit in OP is intense.
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#7
I have a Lali drum my parents picked up from Fiji. It's pretty awesome, I love Pacific island drumming.
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Call me Paul. I prefer that.
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#9
I love tablas. My drummer started learning it a while back and he said it's the hardest instrument he's ever learnt to play
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#11
Yes
Quote by fleajr_1412
I love tablas. My drummer started learning it a while back and he said it's the hardest instrument he's ever learnt to play

That's what the guy said
#12
I'm just gonna go ahead and get it out of the way.


Needs moar cowbell.


Now we can move on
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#13
This thread needs more Cajon

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...Leaving Material World Behind...


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#17
Quote by TheReverend724
Yes

That's what the guy said



Tabla isn't thaaaaaat difficult.

But it is tough to get an initial grip on it.

And playing with your hands is PAINFUL.
I still get muscle cramps around my thumb when i play for a stretch.


I took lessons for like 6 years, but haven't played in a while now (so i'm a bit rusty).
#18
Quote by Skinny91
This thread needs more Cajon




I made myself a cajon a last december but did it out of solid wood instead of ply. Lasted about 2 weeks before the soundboard started cracking and splitting next time I guess I'm gonna have to go cheap and use plywood.
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#19
I know this is a double post but it's a completely different train of thought and don't what them to get lumped together.

I need advice on how to mic the drums in my percussion rig. The only way I've found to catch the resonance of my drums as well as the snap of the top is to use 2 mics on most of them. I use 2 congas, set of bongos, set of mini bongos, 12" djembe, 13" djembe, and a cajon. Micing, just my drums, when recording takes 13 mics. When we are on stage I only use 7 mics but nut having a mic under my congas and bongos means all I get is snap and no depth.

Does anybody have bongo and conga micing tips if you want depth and the snap from the head?

Oh and I've tried using several mics including sure sm57, sm58, Karma bullet, Karma K10, AKG d112, AKG C1000, AKG C3000b, and the Mics from the audiotechnica 5pc drum mic kit. I can't afford expensive mics but none of these are what I would call bad mics.

Dose anybody else here actually play percussion?My standard setup for a gig is 2 congas, 2 bongos, 2 mini bongo, cajon, and 13" Djembe. I also use other stuff but I'm concerned about the drums. What I need to know it if you are playing these instruments, how do you mic them? I've tried all sorts of things and the only way I've managed to get the tone I like is to mic under and over each drum (except the mini bongos) and thats 12 mics just for drums. This is ok for recording but not playing live. There simply isn't enough mixer space. What I need are good mics that can trap both the crack of the top and the resonance of the instrument as well as advice on where to b We have another drummer that uses 7 mics for his
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#20
ever thought about using a submixer and giving a two line stereo to the main mixer? that would be the only way to solve your problem, all others would be compromising...
you've got this setup you like, your mics arent half bad, get a simple 12ch mixer and take it on stage.
Only other way: take condenser overheads to get all slapps and high sounds and place single mics to get the deep notes. That will lead to feedback probs and too much other noise on the overheads, depending on how loud the monitoring is in your life setup. So stick to micing close and plenty.

Last thing: I once mixed some percussionist doing a complete show with two mics attached to his wrists. Split them on full stereo, and dude made the hardest stuff working with this (passing shaker from hand to hand...). Sounded really good, missed some of the deep notes of course.
#21
I've kind of done what you are suggesting and yeah... It meant turning the overheads so hot that feedback was a problem. Some of that may have been the boxy shape of the space I was jammed into but I'll have to try it again at a pub with a better shaped performance space because in some spaces it just isn't possible to get it to sound right.
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