#1
So I played a PRS SE Custom 24 through a Mesa dual Rec, and it was awesome.

Then a Gibson Lp studio, and it was so clear! Much more than the PRS, sO I'm wondering if I took a specific pickup from one guitar, into another, how similar would it sound? Provided they where different wood.
Like would it sound close, or no where near the same? I assumed it would be pretty similar I'm playing On replacing a dead pickup soon.
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#3
That's all I needed =] thanks. Because even it though it was a studio it was still much much better
Splawn Street Rod
H&K Tubemeister 5
Line 6 G90 System

Gibson SG Standard
Godin Radiator
Dillion 653 GA/3CT
Seagull Coastline s6
New Music on Spotify
#5
Unfortunately only hardware matters. A maker of Deans did a test where he made 2 guitar exactly the same except he use the most expensive wood one one guitar and like plywood (i think thats what it was) on another. Then he took it to a manufacturer and said to play both and tell him if they could tell a difference in the sound. The guy said he couldn't really hear a difference. He then told him the difference in the guitars and proved that hardware is everything in an electric guitar
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#7
I used very high gain, starting low then moving high and higher to see how clear it stays
Splawn Street Rod
H&K Tubemeister 5
Line 6 G90 System

Gibson SG Standard
Godin Radiator
Dillion 653 GA/3CT
Seagull Coastline s6
New Music on Spotify
#8
Quote by FatalGear41
In the end, the only question is: what bass would Jesus play?

I think he's a Fender Jazz guy.
#9
Some will tell you wood matters, some will say it doesn't. Nobody truly knows, but pickups are far more important.
#10
stock gibson pickups aren't even that good.
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
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#11
Quote by 100%
Unfortunately only hardware matters. A maker of Deans did a test where he made 2 guitar exactly the same except he use the most expensive wood one one guitar and like plywood (i think thats what it was) on another. Then he took it to a manufacturer and said to play both and tell him if they could tell a difference in the sound. The guy said he couldn't really hear a difference. He then told him the difference in the guitars and proved that hardware is everything in an electric guitar


ya that sounds like a great test.
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
PRS Hollowbody II / BKP Warpigs
Strandberg OS6T / BKP Aftermath
Strandberg OS7 / Lace Poopsticks
Skervesen Raptor 7FF / BKP Warpigs
Skervesen Raptor 6 NTB / BKP Juggernauts
Hapas Sludge 7 FF / Hapas Leviathan
Anderson Baritom / Motorcity Nuke BKP Sinner Anderson H2+
Warmoth Baritone / BKP Piledriver
Ibanez Rg2120x / BKP Nailbomb

Blackstar ID:Core Beam
#12
Haha can of worms. Well I liked them. Also this is comparing just two sets of pickups. Oh well thanks guys
Splawn Street Rod
H&K Tubemeister 5
Line 6 G90 System

Gibson SG Standard
Godin Radiator
Dillion 653 GA/3CT
Seagull Coastline s6
New Music on Spotify
#14
How was their guitar before the swap
Splawn Street Rod
H&K Tubemeister 5
Line 6 G90 System

Gibson SG Standard
Godin Radiator
Dillion 653 GA/3CT
Seagull Coastline s6
New Music on Spotify
#15
I don't know. I'm just saying that woods do still make a considerable difference in tone.
I have D-Activators, which are known to be really bright pickups, in a mahogany guitar. (mahogany is known to be quite dark) I bought a basswood guitar, and with the stock pickups it is almost as bright as the mahogany guitar.

Those are 2 experiences that showed me how much of a difference the woods actually make.
#16
also something i want to point out tho, even though hardware matters more, there is a noticable differece when comparing guitars with different shapes.

for example: my gibson V with emgs on its own sounds fine and thats mahogany body and neck

then my MiM tele (which is friggen heavey) sounds so much more articulate and dense and punchy but it doesnt get as much gain. and thats alder body maple neck


so like even with the same hardware, shape makes a differnce too
#17
Quote by Seanthesheep
also something i want to point out tho, even though hardware matters more, there is a noticable differece when comparing guitars with different shapes.

for example: my gibson V with emgs on its own sounds fine and thats mahogany body and neck

then my MiM tele (which is friggen heavey) sounds so much more articulate and dense and punchy but it doesnt get as much gain. and thats alder body maple neck


so like even with the same hardware, shape makes a differnce too

Thats not really a good example since both guitars have different hardware, tonewoods and pick ups.
Quote by FatalGear41
In the end, the only question is: what bass would Jesus play?

I think he's a Fender Jazz guy.
#18
its not a question of which one is more important, different pickups will respond differently with different wood. its all about finding the right combination
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#19
Quote by EspTro
its not a question of which one is more important, different pickups will respond differently with different wood. its all about finding the right combination

This.
I've got a BKP Nailbomb, originally it was in my Charvel, but I put it in my S to see what it was like. I actually liked it a lot more in the mahogany S than I did in the basswood Charvel. Likewise, the D-Sonic that was in the S worked better in the Charvel to my ears.
Finding what works for you is most important.
#20
oh man wut to put in basswood.

strugglin. phil strugglin.
Jumping on dat gear sig train.
PRS Hollowbody II / BKP Warpigs
Strandberg OS6T / BKP Aftermath
Strandberg OS7 / Lace Poopsticks
Skervesen Raptor 7FF / BKP Warpigs
Skervesen Raptor 6 NTB / BKP Juggernauts
Hapas Sludge 7 FF / Hapas Leviathan
Anderson Baritom / Motorcity Nuke BKP Sinner Anderson H2+
Warmoth Baritone / BKP Piledriver
Ibanez Rg2120x / BKP Nailbomb

Blackstar ID:Core Beam
#22
The people at Gibson dont use expensive wood because they like to, if it wasnt nessecary they wouldn't.
So does Fender.
But those are guitars on which are also being played Jazz and Blues on, in these styles wood definately matters.

With the cheapest wood, your clean would sound soo chilly, its ok if you like that, thats why there are soo many guitars,

If you play with a lot of gain, you can basically make a guitar of cardboard.
Its just what YOU want to play with you guitar.
Last edited by Dennis_SG at Apr 7, 2011,
#23
I think it depends on the construction of the guitar, the pickups used and the amp you're using. When you've got active pickups going into a Triple Rectifier set to a thrash metal tone, I don't think the wood matters at all. When you're playing a semi-hollow archtop with passive P-90s into a Fender Pro Reverb with almost no gain, the wood and the construction matters more than what specific type of P-90 you have. For standard rock tones, gritty blues tones or classic metal tones, I think it's an even mix of the two.
#24
Quote by AcousticMirror
oh man wut to put in basswood.

strugglin. phil strugglin.

Miracle Man? Rebel Yells? Maybe even a ceramic Nailbomb.
I'm thinking of getting some Warpigs, just for the br00tz

In my experience, wood matters a fair bit, even with high gain (although muddy amps will cover the effect a bit)
I swapped necks on my S540, both necks were maple/rosewood fretboard, and there was a pretty big difference, that was more noticeable to me on the lead channel. The original neck was a bit heavier, because its denser maple, and the guitar was a fair bit brighter with that neck. With the new neck, it darkened the tone a bit.
#27
This is not a proper question to ask. Neither is more important than the other. One will have more of an affect depending of the application.. To most super metalheads on this forum, the neckwood will have more of a tone affect than the body, but anyone who plays with little to no gain (which is maybe only 5% of us) will quickly tell you that wood characteristics are very vibrant and noticable.

Sometimes wood is crucial. Sometimes pickups are the only thing of consequence. It all depends on the application. It's all on a case-by-case basis.
#28
Quote by JustRooster
This is not a proper question to ask. Neither is more important than the other. One will have more of an affect depending of the application.. To most super metalheads on this forum, the neckwood will have more of a tone affect than the body, but anyone who plays with little to no gain (which is maybe only 5% of us) will quickly tell you that wood characteristics are very vibrant and noticable.

Sometimes wood is crucial. Sometimes pickups are the only thing of consequence. It all depends on the application. It's all on a case-by-case basis.


Seconded. Tonally, EVERYTHING Matters. Even small things like the width of the fret wire make a difference. There's a small tonal difference between plastic and bone nuts but its there.
Always tin your strings.

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