#1
This is the first time I have ever used chord voicing while composing. Can you tell me if it is any good/if it makes harmonic sense?

E Major:

E- G#m - A - B - C#m/G# - C#m - B - E6/C# - F#sus4 - A - G#m - E

(The G#m to E is intro to verse, so I tried not to make it such a strong cadence).

I use the first G#m and the first B as passing chords. I used the E6/C# to add a sort of "lifting" feeling (the five to the six).

Am I doing this chord voicing stuff right or
#2
Quote by Night_Warrior
This is the first time I have ever used chord voicing while composing. Can you tell me if it is any good/if it makes harmonic sense?

E Major:

E- G#m - A - B - C#m/G# - C#m - B - E6/C# - F#sus4 - A - G#m - E

(The G#m to E is intro to verse, so I tried not to make it such a strong cadence).

I use the first G#m and the first B as passing chords. I used the E6/C# to add a sort of "lifting" feeling (the five to the six).

Am I doing this chord voicing stuff right or



^ You probably mean chord progression. (not voicing)

You seem to understand the idea of being in a key which is great. I suggest learning about the concept of chord function, and then come back and try again.

As an exercise I would suggest starting with only the 3 primary chords. learn to recognize if a chord is moving away from the tonic, or moving back towards it. Spend some quality time there. It's only 3 chords, but you can do alot with them. Be creative... listen!

then build on that foundation....

try adding some color by using the other chords.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 6, 2011,
#4
In tonality chords function in certain ways. I iii and vi all function as tonic chords, which sound, more or less, settled. ii and IV are subdominant which move away from the tonic and towards the dominant chords, which are viidim and V, which in turn lead back to the tonic. I-IV-V-I epitomizes this idea of tonic-subdominant-dominant progression which almost all progressions can be defined as.

The first bit of the progression actually makes sense in that you go I-iii (also tonic-y)-IV-V-vi (tonic-y, again). The later bit gets a little more odd to me.
#5
I don't know if this makes a difference, but I added the progression. I am really sorry for sounding dumb

EDIT: Here is the correct one
Attachments:
drum 1.mid
Last edited by Night_Warrior at Apr 6, 2011,
#6
Voicing is just where you play the chord. Like one voice for G is e-3 b-0 g-0 d-0 a-2 e-3 or another would be e-10 b-12 g-12. Just different ways to play a chord.
#7
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
The first bit of the progression actually makes sense in that you go I-iii (also tonic-y)-IV-V-vi (tonic-y, again). The later bit gets a little more odd to me.


Odd is fine, especially if it's "odd" because it doesn't follow somebody's pre-defined set of rules, especially if it sounds good to him.
#8
I suggest for you be familiar with the common chord progressions such as 2-5-1 minor 2-5-1 turnaround, rhythm changes, ascending/descending ii V and so on, then you can harmonize these by using chord substitution to get different flavors.

Voicing deals with the way the chords are connected in movement, usually a pivot note/notes will be selected for the different chords to move around it, but this only one small aspect of voicing which is a pretty huge subject.