#1
So, recently i have been trying to expand my horizons for guitar rhythmically, so i have been trying to learn that part of reggae. Now what i have learned so far is that you want to accent offbeats, for example, you would accent the 2nd and 4th beats if the song was in 4/4 time. Also i have learned that you have to kind of play it with a swing feel, like triplets without the middle note. I kind of have a good thing going with the rhythm guitar and lead guitar on 4/4. Basically what im asking is, how would you go about playing reggae in more complex time signatures such as 7/8 or 3/4? What beats would you accent? etc. Any help is appreciated, thanks in advance
#3
Quote by Night_Warrior
7/8 (3/4+1/8)

one - two - THREE - four - five - six - SEVEN

What would be an example for playing this rhythmically, through chords or something, and how would you take a lead approach to playing this
#4
I know nothing about reggae man. I only know those odd time signatures and where to accent sorry.
#5
Quote by Night_Warrior
I know nothing about reggae man. I only know those odd time signatures and where to accent sorry.

Its cool man haha, yeah thats one of things that confuses me, normally you would accent the 1 and 3 in something like 5/4, but when it comes to reggae, you would accent something else, and then im completely lost when it comes to lead playing and reggae haha
#7
Just experiment with it. See what sounds good. I've never really heard of reggae i'n any odd time signatures but anything is worth a try. I mean, you don't HAVE TO accent any particular beats. Just do whatsounds good
I hate my sig
#8
Quote by Night_Warrior
7/8 (3/4+1/8)

one - two - THREE - four - five - six - SEVEN



Depends

Money, by Pink Floyd uses 4/4 + 3/4 .. the accents are on the downbeats.

Solsbury Hill By Peter Gabriel is 3/4 + 4/4 -- but there are 7 accented downbeats per measure in the drums, the guitar part goes ONE two three one TWO three FOUR ...


Reggae is a dance ... based on ska and rocksteady. It's always in 4/4 or 12/8 depending on the feel of the accented upbeats -- sometimes a swing feel, sometimes a triplet feel, sometimes straight eighths. Rocksteady uses more of a 12/8 ("Pressure Drop" by Toots Hibbert).

If you want to hear reggae in 5, listen to King Tubby's version of Take 5 by Dave Brubeck (the song is in 4, but the opening several measures are closer to Brubeck's composition)

The problem is that as soon as you hit a triplet rhythm (like most compound rhythms that use duples and triples) playing the upbeats doesn't make sense without a change in tempo .... if you have a clear downbeat like "Solsbury Hill" you can play the upbeats ... but it end up clashing with other parts of the song.
#10
Quote by Zen Skin

Money, by Pink Floyd uses 4/4 + 3/4 .. the accents are on the downbeats.


The Easy Star All Star's dub/reggae version of Money is in 7/8 if you want to check that out as an example of 7/8 reggae - it's odd, I think they changed other songs (Brain Damage and Lucy In The Sky, both 3/4) from their original time sigs to 4/4 when they covered them reggae-style, but they left Money. The riff must be too iconic to mess with

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_aYli_1iqs
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#11
well the reason i wanted to learn how to play something like this is because of the interview i saw of steve vai, im a big steve vai fan, so after hearing the story of how steve vai auditioned for zappas band, i wanted to know how someone would go about playing something in 7/8 reggae, like steve had to
#12
Quote by Damascus
The Easy Star All Star's dub/reggae version of Money is in 7/8 if you want to check that out as an example of 7/8 reggae - it's odd, I think they changed other songs (Brain Damage and Lucy In The Sky, both 3/4) from their original time sigs to 4/4 when they covered them reggae-style, but they left Money. The riff must be too iconic to mess with

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_aYli_1iqs



Great link!


Notice what the guitar player is doing ... he is playing on two, four and six of the 7 beats.

Vai also tells a story of Zappa asking him to keep adding notes to a chord -- when he ran out of fingers Vai said "You, you can't play that" to which Zappa replied "I hear the Partridge Family is having tryouts down the block."


Love that story!!!!

I worked with a guy who went to Berklee with Vai -- Vai would get calls in the middle of the night that a tape was arriving overnight and Zappa wanted a transcription faxed back asap.

There is a reason he was a "Mother".

Saw the two of them play Halloween show in NYC .. Steve was still getting his chops together -- Frank blew the poor kid off the stage. At one point Steve was lying on the stage while members of the band took turns pantomiming spanking him.

Oh! The abuse!!!
#13
Quote by Metallica_JHC21
Basically what im asking is, how would you go about playing reggae in more complex time signatures such as 7/8 or 3/4? What beats would you accent? etc.

well really the simplest answer is, you wouldn't.

reggae is most commonly written in 4/4 (and occassionally 3/4 i think), that's not to say a song in an odd time sig that sounds reggae isn't reggae, its just so uncommon in reggae that there isn't a reggae way of doing it.
so 7/8, if you could find a few reggae songs using that time u may want to examine how they do it and take influence from that, but there's no standard reggae way of using 7/8, therefore you don't have anything really to study, you just do it however you want.
now about lead guitar playing in reggae, the genre is more defined by the other instruments like the rhythm guitar, bass, and drums, so fo reggae lead guitar i would suggest you learn different styles and bring those into the mix. i've heard a lot of blues lead guitar playing over reggae rhythm sections that sound really cool. i've also heard some trippy tremolo-picking riffs with some effects like delay, chorus, or reverb, i would think they got that from psychedelic rock, i heard a local reggae band called "eazydub" do that in some songs, i think a couple in 3/4.
Last edited by TMVATDI at Apr 8, 2011,
#14
Make it sound good, give it your own touch
because tbh , most of the public who listens to reggae dont pay much attention to the guitar..
or the music in general XD