#3
What are some more common ones of these? (meaning other common number of notes played during a beat) also can it be played in any time signature?
#5
most commone are (besides whole note, 2nds, 4ths, 8ths, 16ths, 32ths) probably 8th-notes-triplets (3), 16th-notes-triplets (6, with every first and fourth note accented), quintuplets (5), septuplets (7), sixtuplets (would be the same amount of notes as 16th-notes-triplets, but with a different accent) and ninetuplets (9).
there are also things like eleventuplets or even more, but they are very uncommon.
most important are 3s (8th, 16th), 5s, and 7s.
What?
#6
It depends what kind of triplets.

If we are in common time (4/4 time) then there are four beats to the bar and each beat is equal to one quarter note.

We could have a quarter note triplet which would mean three notes to every two beats.
We could have eighth note triplets which would mean three notes would be equal to two eighth notes (one beat).
We could have sixteenth not triplets which would mean three notes that are equal to two sixteenth notes (half a beat).

You can do all sorts of different kinds of "tuplets". It's just an irregular number of beats in a given time signature. So playing five notes in the space of four (quintuplet) while playing seven in the space of four or seven in the space of six would be septuplet i guess.

Sextuplets are six in the space of four but that would be similar to two triplets
Si
#7
Quote by jesus3000
most commone are (besides whole note, 2nds, 4ths, 8ths, 16ths, 32ths) probably 8th-notes-triplets (3), 16th-notes-triplets (6, with every first and fourth note accented), quintuplets (5), septuplets (7), sixtuplets (would be the same amount of notes as 16th-notes-triplets, but with a different accent) and ninetuplets (9).
there are also things like eleventuplets or even more, but they are very uncommon.
most important are 3s (8th, 16th), 5s, and 7s.



So with the more common ones you would strum the note that many times per beat, as well?
#8
Quote by schism8
So with the more common ones you would strum the note that many times per beat, as well?


of course.
3 is three notes per 4th beat. 5 is 5 notes per 4th beat and so on.
What?
#9
Quote by 20Tigers
Sextuplets are six in the space of four but that would be similar to two triplets


this is actually wrong.
there is a difference in correctly accenting the notes.
two groups of triplets have two accents, whereas one group of sixtuplets has only one accent
What?
#10
Quote by jesus3000
of course.
3 is three notes per 4th beat. 5 is 5 notes per 4th beat and so on.

so you only strum it a certain time on the 4th beat?
not on the others?
#11
Quote by schism8
so you only strum it a certain time on the 4th beat?
not on the others?


i guess you misunderstood me
i didn't mean THE 4th beat, i mean A 4th beat. when you're in a 4/4 time signature and you have a metronome clicking, it clicks 4 4th notes per bar.
one 4th note is as long as two 8th notes or four 16th notes.

i'll try to illustrate what i mean:

1xxx2xxx3xxx4xxx would be 16th notes. accenting every first note of a group of 16th notes (consisting of 4 16th notes)

1xx2xx3xx4xx are triplets.

1xxxx2xxxx3xxxx4xxxx are 5s (quintuplets)
and so on.

and you don't "strum" them. you "pick" 'em
What?
#12
alright that made sence. but one last question, would you have to go 1xx2xx3xx4xx or could you go 1xx2 3xx4, you know, change it up a bit.
#13
Quote by jesus3000
this is actually wrong.
there is a difference in correctly accenting the notes.
two groups of triplets have two accents, whereas one group of sixtuplets has only one accent

It's not actually wrong because they are indeed similar. That doesn't mean they are the same only that they have similarities. Had you said it was misleading then yeah I can see that. And the word is actually sextuplets - if you want to get all technical.

And to the TS the important thing is that you play the right number of equal notes in the same time it would normally take to play a different note value - determined by the note value indicated

So a triplet is three equal notes in the same time it would normally take to play two.

So normally if you have 4/4 time you might count it

One and two and three and four and

The clicks are on the numbers but if you play a note on the numbers and the "ands" you are playing eighth notes. Eighth note triplets will be three even notes in the space of "two and"

You might count it as "one and tri puh let three and four and" the clicks would be on the "one" "tri" "three" "four"

But they can be played anywhere in the bar it doesn't have to be on the beat.

For example if you count out sixteenth notes you would count it as:

1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a

Again the clicks are on 1 2 3 4 each one of those is a quarter note and you are counting four times for each quarter note which is a sixteenth note. An eighth note triplet would still take up two eighth notes. You could play an eighth note triplet starting anywhere such as on one of the sixteenth beat divisions like

1 e & tri puh let a 3 e & a 4 e & a

This is tricky because the click would quite fall after the "tri" but before the "puh". So yeah they can start anywhere but if you're just picking this up then try to stick with the beats.

Counting and practicing them 1xx2 3xx4 it's good also to mix them up so that you're playing in straight eighths then throw in an eighth note triplet so you get used to how they fit into the straight time.

1 & 2 & tri puh let 4 & 1 & tri puh let 3 & 4 &
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Apr 8, 2011,
#14
Quote by schism8
alright that made sence. but one last question, would you have to go 1xx2xx3xx4xx or could you go 1xx2 3xx4, you know, change it up a bit.

yep you can change it up a bit... also the easiest way I've found to count triplets is 1 trip-let, 2 trip-let, 3 trip-let, 4 triplet and your other one would be one trip-let, two, three trip-let, four.... good luck and keep practing!
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#15
Quote by 20Tigers
It's not actually wrong because they are indeed similar. That doesn't mean they are the same only that they have similarities. Had you said it was misleading then yeah I can see that. And the word is actually sextuplets - if you want to get all technical.

And to the TS the important thing is that you play the right number of equal notes in the same time it would normally take to play a different note value - determined by the note value indicated

So a triplet is three equal notes in the same time it would normally take to play two.

So normally if you have 4/4 time you might count it

One and two and three and four and

The clicks are on the numbers but if you play a note on the numbers and the "ands" you are playing eighth notes. Eighth note triplets will be three even notes in the space of "two and"

You might count it as "one and tri puh let three and four and" the clicks would be on the "one" "tri" "three" "four"

But they can be played anywhere in the bar it doesn't have to be on the beat.

For example if you count out sixteenth notes you would count it as:

1 e & a 2 e & a 3 e & a 4 e & a

Again the clicks are on 1 2 3 4 each one of those is a quarter note and you are counting four times for each quarter note which is a sixteenth note. An eighth note triplet would still take up two eighth notes. You could play an eighth note triplet starting anywhere such as on one of the sixteenth beat divisions like

1 e & tri puh let a 3 e & a 4 e & a

This is tricky because the click would quite fall after the "tri" but before the "puh". So yeah they can start anywhere but if you're just picking this up then try to stick with the beats.

Counting and practicing them 1xx2 3xx4 it's good also to mix them up so that you're playing in straight eighths then throw in an eighth note triplet so you get used to how they fit into the straight time.

1 & 2 & tri puh let 4 & 1 & tri puh let 3 & 4 &

This got me a little confused, maybe I'm reading it wrong? are you trying to say now triplets means 3 notes over two beats?

Also so when ever you're playing and you play on an "and" that note what ever it may be becomes an eight note?

and the rest i'm still kinda confused about, sorry.

EDIT: I'd also like to thank everyone. I appreciate your help and sorry if I didn't quote you.
#16
Quote by schism8
This got me a little confused, maybe I'm reading it wrong? are you trying to say now triplets means 3 notes over two beats?

Also so when ever you're playing and you play on an "and" that note what ever it may be becomes an eight note?

and the rest i'm still kinda confused about, sorry.

EDIT: I'd also like to thank everyone. I appreciate your help and sorry if I didn't quote you.

the answer to the first question is kind of.... so most of the time triplets refeer to eighth note triplets (half the size of a quarter note) and three eighth note triplets fill in the space of two... if you were to have quarter note triplets they would take up two beats.... but this part is confusing if you don't already have a full understanding of note values, so I'm gonna try to help you with note values.

one beat is typically a quarter note. yes there are exceptions but forget about that for now cuz you already need work on note values... so heres how it works for every click of the metronome, you would count one two three four. each click is equal to a quarter note, so when you start to cound one and two and etc. the number is on the beat and the 'and' is off of the beat, usually triplets fit in the same space as 'one and' typically I count them as 'one triplet, two triplet, etc.'

heres a chart that I hope is helpful:

whole note = 4 beats
count it as "one (two) (three) (four)"

dotted half note = 3 beats
count it as "one (two) (three)"

half note = 2 beats
count it as "one (two) three (four)"

quarter note = 1 beat
count as "one two three four"

eighth note = 1/2 beat
count as "one and two and three and four and"

triplet = 1/3 beat
count as "one trip-let two trip-let three trip-let four trip-let"

sixteenth note = 1/4 beat
count as " one e and a, two e and a, three e and a, four e and a"

numbers in ( ) are counted in your head
*NOTE* this is not every note value just the more common ones


I hope this helps you understand a bit better
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#17
Quote by schism8
This got me a little confused, maybe I'm reading it wrong? are you trying to say now triplets means 3 notes over two beats?


The "beat" is determined by the time signature. In common time (4/4 time) the beat is on the quarter note and there are four beats to the bar. This is not always the case. Sometimes the "beat" could be a half note or an eighth note .

Triplets can also have different values. Some triplets are quicker than others . So it doesn't make sense to say that triplets are three notes to every "beat" without defining the beat and defining what kind of triplets you are talking about.

I just felt that was not being expressed here and was trying to make sure your question is answered properly.

To keep things simple stay with common time (4/4 time) which means there are four "beats" per bar(the top number) and each beat is equal to a quarter note (the bottom number). Then you can look at the different kind of triplets and see how many "beats" each one will be worth in 4/4 time.

If you are playing quarter note triplets for example then there will be three equally spaced notes in the time it usually takes to play two quarter notes. (in common time this would be three notes over two beats. Listen to the main riff in Ben Harper's Burn One Down for an example of quarter note triplets.) Hence in this time sig a quarter note triplet would be three notes in the space of two "beats".

If you are playing eighth note triplets then you would play three equally spaced notes in the time it takes to play two eighth notes. (Since two eighth notes is equal to one quarter note and one quarter note is one beat in 4/4 time then that would be three equal notes in one "beat").

If you are playing sixteenth note triplets then you would play three equally spaced notes in the time it takes to play two sixteenth notes. (in common time that would be three equal notes in half a "beat").

So as you can see how many beats a triplet will be played over depends on what value notes have the beat (which is defined by the time signature) and what value triplets you are being asked to play.

Quote by schism8
Also so when ever you're playing and you play on an "and" that note what ever it may be becomes an eight note?
Its not so important when you play them it matters how long they last.

In four four time there are four beats per bar and each beat is a quarter note. So there would be two half notes or one whole note per bar.

If we split each quarter note into two notes each of which is half the value then we have two eighth notes. While a sixteenth note would be four notes to each quarter note (sixteen per bar).

However we can play play different combinations of notes throughout the bar. So (in 4/4 time) as long the whole bar adds up to the equivalent of four quarter notes it doesn't matter exactly where the different kinds of notes fall.

The value of the note only tells you how much time it takes up not "where" in the count it is. The notes that come before it (including the rests) will tell you "where" the note falls in the count.

I'm sorry if my explanations have been confusing but it's better to give you the "right" answer than just say "yes" and let you run off with a flawed understanding. If you keep asking questions about anything that is confusing I'll keep trying to improve my responses until they make sense.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Apr 12, 2011,
#18
Could someone give an example of a song that uses triplets a lot? I have a loose understanding of the term (mainly thanks to this thread) but I'd like to see it in action.

Thanks,
Synth
#19
Sixteenth Note Triplets
Black Mountain Side uses some fast sixteenth triplets in the main riff (the second beat you will hear three fast notes in the space of two notes.

Then when the second guitar comes in there are some sixteenth sextuplets (six beats in the space of four sixteenth notes).

Eighth Note Triplets
Wolfmother is your friend.
Woman uses eighth note triplets on the fourth beat in the main riff (three times then two half notes in the fourth bar) then later on (about 1:08) it uses eighth note triplets on the first second and third beats and a whole note on the fourth. It changes again (around 1:20) to triplets on beats one and three and whole notes on beats two and four. And pretty much uses those combinations throughout the song

Quarter Note Triplets
Robert Plant sings some phrases in quarter note triplets in a few songs - in Communication Breakdown towards the end the last couple of times he sings "I want you to love me" He also does it in Celebration Day "My my my"

Ben Harper's Burn One Down has the main riff repeat a few times then it plays some quarter note triplets to provide variation in the main riff.


There are probably more simple songs than these out there - Hickery Dickery Dock something like that. And you can probably find examples on you tube of how to count triplets. But there's some examples I had handy.
Si
#20
Quote by schism8
alright that made sence. but one last question, would you have to go 1xx2xx3xx4xx or could you go 1xx2 3xx4, you know, change it up a bit.

You can obviously play different rhythms. I don't want to be mean, but what kind of question is that? Music is an art. Do what you want with it.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#21
Quote by 20Tigers
Sixteenth Note Triplets
Black Mountain Side uses some fast sixteenth triplets in the main riff (the second beat you will hear three fast notes in the space of two notes.

Then when the second guitar comes in there are some sixteenth sextuplets (six beats in the space of four sixteenth notes).

Eighth Note Triplets
Wolfmother is your friend.
Woman uses eighth note triplets on the fourth beat in the main riff (three times then two half notes in the fourth bar) then later on (about 1:08) it uses eighth note triplets on the first second and third beats and a whole note on the fourth. It changes again (around 1:20) to triplets on beats one and three and whole notes on beats two and four. And pretty much uses those combinations throughout the song

Quarter Note Triplets
Robert Plant sings some phrases in quarter note triplets in a few songs - in Communication Breakdown towards the end the last couple of times he sings "I want you to love me" He also does it in Celebration Day "My my my"

Ben Harper's Burn One Down has the main riff repeat a few times then it plays some quarter note triplets to provide variation in the main riff.


There are probably more simple songs than these out there - Hickery Dickery Dock something like that. And you can probably find examples on you tube of how to count triplets. But there's some examples I had handy.


Exactly the kind of stuff I was looking for. Thank you.