#1
To my knowledge, the 2 important things that relate to computer speed\tankness for recording programs are the CPU and RAM, and thus i'm gunna get someone to help me build a new one.

I'm currently running my setup with:
CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 CPU 4300 @ 1.80ghz (2CPUs)
RAM: 2046MB

THE QUESTION
How much Processor speed and RAM do you think is a safe amount to get?

I'll be using PLENTY of plugins and hoping to use lots of synths (e.g. rerouting them from FL into Cubase). And VST instruments like SD v.2 which my current computer now suffers CPU overloads if i use the AMB mics at all. Added to this, i can only get 1 track of Guitar plugins (TSE, nic crowe head, voxengo impulse) before i run out of cpu strength, which does not lend itself at all to virtual guitars :\
Everything owes its existence solely and completely to sound.

Sound is the factor which holds it together.
#2
You need more ram. I've recorded on worse processors and 4gb of ram and had no problems
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
I can run 4 instances of POD Farm + between 50-75 VST effects on mixer(Reverb/compressor/etc.) + around 10 VSTis in FL Studio 10 with:

AMD Pheonom Quad Core clocked to 3.4GHz
4 GB RAM

that is pushing the system to almost the limits

so unless your doing more than that your safe. All you have to do is bounce those POD Farms to .wavs and that frees up a lot of space so you can theoretically run more. I usually run low on CPU before running low on RAM.
Last edited by FireHawk at Apr 8, 2011,
#4
^you're running a quad at double the speed of his CPU though. A dual core at under 2ghz isn't going to handle much.

TS are you looking to upgrade your system or get a new one or what?

4gb of RAM is more than enough in most situations, I do fine with 2. For a dual core you want something close to 3ghz, tri or quad core anything above 2.5 should suffice. Obviously lower will work but ideally those specs will give you plenty of headroom.
For Frodo!
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
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#5
Quote by robertito696
^you're running a quad at double the speed of his CPU though. A dual core at under 2ghz isn't going to handle much.



I was just giving him an idea of what he could upgrade to. I am running on a 500 dollar system. I forgot to mention that part. So thats pretty cheap.

I should add though what do you mean by plenty of plugins? I am soon upgrading to 6GB and you see what I run (I can most of the time get by with 4 pretty easily and barely come close to running out of RAM in my most intense projects which are heavily electronic/industrial and are kind of overkill + running doing non music related things). I just like breathing room.

If you upgrade you need CPU more than RAM. You even mentioned running out of CPU space. I doubt you will run out of RAM space. I usually am using around 65% of my processor (remember I am quad core and TS is dual core) before I even use 2GB.


EDIT: If I were to rebuild my computer (which is just for music) I would go 3.6GHz (x4), 6GB RAM, 7200 RPM Hard drives. That would be way more than enough. That though is assuming you use a lot of VSTs.

At minimum I would go 2.5GHz (X4) and 4GB RAM (even if you don't need the 4GB RAM) and 5200 RPM Harddrives. That is a pretty cheap build that would satisfy most people and give a little bit of room.
Last edited by FireHawk at Apr 8, 2011,
#6
Quote by FireHawk

At minimum I would go 2.5GHz (X4) and 4GB RAM (even if you don't need the 4GB RAM) and 5200 RPM Harddrives. That is a pretty cheap build that would satisfy most people and give a little bit of room.


The 5200 rpm hard drive makes me nervous.

But my system is only a 2.8 ghz (single core Intel) with I think 2.5GB of RAM.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
I run an i7 chip (quad core) and have 19 GB or RAM and run Sonar Producer with Native Instruments VST's.

I *seem* to be ok.

I was running with 8GB RAM and having infrequent crashes. NI Kore is a hog.

A faster drive would be nice .... but a dedicated hard drive is pretty important.

Also -- ASIO and a dedicated soundcard (one intended for recording with XLR and MIDI inputs, amplifier and several choices of sample rate and bit depth) are VERY important if you want to have a usable setup.

Do not skimp on a video card!

A lot of recording software is GPU intensive.

With all the hardware in the world, it is still a good idea to freeze synths that are not being edited, archive and hide tracks that are used for scratch vocals/guitar parts/alternate takes/ etc. Try to use a send bus for reverb and delay rather than put these effects on the main bus or individual tracks. If you are working with convolution reverb or another CPU hungry effect .. wait till you are closer to the final mixdown and can focus on one track of bus at a time without lots of other VST's running. In Sonar as most DAW's you can clone a track with a series of effects, apply the effects to the clones track and archive the "master" track freeing up CPU and RAM by turning off VSTs.

So -- it helps to learn tricks!
#8
Quote by Zen Skin
I run an i7 chip (quad core) and have 19 GB or RAM and run Sonar Producer with Native Instruments VST's.

I *seem* to be ok.

Jesus, what kind of music are you making? O.O
#9
Quote by axemanchris
The 5200 rpm hard drive makes me nervous.

But my system is only a 2.8 ghz (single core Intel) with I think 2.5GB of RAM.

CT


I meant 5400RPM (regardless), I would assume he should still be able to record on it fine. I mean for a budget, obviously 7200RPM is preferred.
#10
2 GB of RAM can go along way. I just finished a project that was around 45 tracks with at least an EQ on most tracks. It got a little rough at times, but if you go with 4, you should be good for most tasks. hope that helps some!
#11
Quote by Afroboy267
Jesus, what kind of music are you making? O.O


That's what I was thinking!

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
it's "heavenly" I'll bet...
Now running an Eleven Rack with Pro Tools 10.3.3 - it's amazing and I'm having ball with it - worth every penny. PT 10 is tops IMO and the Eleven Rack is a work of art!
#15
Quote by FireHawk
It's over kill....


... even for NASA.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#16
Quote by Zen Skin
I run an i7 chip (quad core) and have 19 GB or RAM and run Sonar Producer with Native Instruments VST's.


Yeah but can it run Crysis?
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#17
Quote by lockwolf
Yeah but can it run Crysis?



But yeah, to the guy lockwolf and the others quoted... who are you trying to kid? If your computer struggled to do what you are doing when it was 'only' 8GB RAM, are you sure you weren't lied to when you bought it?

I've yet to run into any issues with full mixes, containing software instruments as well and plenty of CPU-heavy convolution reverbs (and I have some of the Waves artist series that use up stupid amounts of space), and I use a 2007 iMac 2.66GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 2GB 800MHz DDR2 SDRAM (copied directly from the system info)... And I've ran smaller projects while having msn for mac open, and firefox with multiple tabs regularly being refreshed/loading, and iTunes playing for reference while mixing, so if you're honestly telling the truth then your music must be like a million instruments on steroids with automation for everything including Dream Theater-esque time-changes...
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#18
what DMW are you using?
theres a test on many many different computers on the ableton forums..
should be a good guide to see what your computer can withstand