#1
Im interested in buying a neck through guitar, more specifically a carvin st300. I just wanted to know how the tone of neck through guitars differ from others.

I've heard that they sound thinner than other necks, but I'm not exactly sure what a thin sound means. Could someone try to explain it or maybe post a link to video?

The tone I'm trying to get is a good tone for solos that has lots of gain but sounds really clear and smooth. Would a neck through do this good? It probably depends more on the woods and such so let me tell you all that also. I want to order it with a mahagony body and neck, ebony fretboard and a maple top. Will this get me that tone? Let me know what you think.
#3
^The sustain thing is a myth. If the build quality is the same, neck joint has absolutely no noticeable differences in sustain.

On a neck through guitar, the neck wood is more important than the 'body' wood, because the pickups and bridge are mounted into the neck piece. A maple neck-through will be quite bright, which many people like for metal, and maple neck-throughs are most common. A mahogany neck through will give you a warmer, fatter tone.
Clarity and smoothness will be affected more by what pickups and amp you use, but a maple neck through with an ebony board and maple top would be fine for what you want.
#4
Quote by ChucklesMginty
Honestly there are so many factors in your tone I don't think neck to body construction will stop you getting a thick sound.

Neck through is said to sustain better than bolt-on however.


But what types of woods would get me closest to this tone.
#5
I have a prototype guitar from the 70s that was built with sustain as goal #1 (for the day). Brass nut, brass bridge, even brass inlays. Solid maple neck-through body. And it does sustain longer than an acoustic, but no longer than any set or bolt neck electric.

The Carvin is a fine guitar, very well made and will sustain with the best of them (and also with the worst, there being no real difference). If you like the look of it, you'll be happy with it.
#6
Quote by littlephil
^The sustain thing is a myth. If the build quality is the same, neck joint has absolutely no noticeable differences in sustain.

On a neck through guitar, the neck wood is more important than the 'body' wood, because the pickups and bridge are mounted into the neck piece. A maple neck-through will be quite bright, which many people like for metal, and maple neck-throughs are most common. A mahogany neck through will give you a warmer, fatter tone.
Clarity and smoothness will be affected more by what pickups and amp you use, but a maple neck through with an ebony board and maple top would be fine for what you want.


Agreed. Actually, I would be careful with a maple neck-through. I have one and it's way too bright. Been fighting with it ever since I got it. If you're going with Carvin, and don't mind the price, go with a koa neck-through. It's an incredible tonewood. Smooth highs, strong (not overbearing) midrange, and a tighter bass than mahogany. Add a maple top and whatever body, and you now have a magnificent instrument! Expect a >$100 upcharge though
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#7
^ Yeah I kinda thought that a maple neck through would be too bright so I was thinking mahogany but I'll check out Koa.
#8
i wouln't worry too much about neck joint when selecting a guitar for any other reason than fret access.

i have had a neck-through guitars throughout the last few years, oddly enough i don't own one at the moment.

as far as the access thing goes, some set joints are getting so intuitive with where there are set there is no heel (well there is a heel its just smaller) or a smaller heel that give you pretty much all you need.

the only thing from a theroetical point bad about neck throughs is that if for example something happened and you dropped the guitar really hard, they can be deemed irrepaiarble easier than a bolt on or set. thats a little bit out there i know, but it is a valid point. you snap the headstock on a gibson you can glue it on, you do it on a bolton, you can buy a new neck, your neck through falls over and hits something and yyou get a crack in the neck, nothing is salvagable (unless you can glue it).

+1 to phil about the sustain
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#9
I have a maple neck-thru mahogany guitar and I don't notice it being too bright. It's not overly bassy like my Les Paul, but it's a hell of a lot warmer than my Strat. It's actually one of the only "medium-toned" guitars I own.
Current Gear:
2002 Gibson Les Paul Standard
'57 AVRI Fender Stratocaster
MIJ Fender Jaguar Special HH
Marshall JVM410
Vox AC15 C2
#10
My SE PRS sounds massive, even unplugged, and sustains forever. I think thats more to do with the body design and material.

Comparing my SL1 to a mates DK1, there doesnt seem to be a huge difference, could maybe put it down to pickup difference.

As someone else said, its probably mostly down to quality of construction.
Gear:
PRS Tremonti SE with PRS USA Tremonti pickups
2001 Ibanez RG470
Peavey Bandit 112
Fender Superchamp XD
USA Jackson SL1