#1
hi guys i was practicing guitar seriously for about 6 mounths now
in all the period i used an exercise routine 1 ---->2 hours maybe 3
it was working for me and now i have a good tecknique(not bad^^)
so from now i ll just learn songs and licks and scales and theory i think that would be more fun for me ! but will i improve my playing ?
srry my english is bad ><
Last edited by mado-elodie at Apr 8, 2011,
#2
Don't ever make playing into a chore. Have fun with it, that's what you're supposed to do.
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#5
If your sick of exercises, dont do them.
Work on a song, read some theory books, improvise.

It all works great, just be focused on what you are doing, dont learn your things sloopy.
But neither make your practiceing boring.
#6
As far as technical exercises go, only learn what you need to. You're wasting your time learning to shred if you only enjoy playing mellow blues, for example.
#8
Quote by mado-elodie
seriously i hate blues ^^ srry


well most repeating licks you find are probably blues licks. and playing blues will really help getting your "feel" when improvising. :P
#9
I think the key is to practise in an enjoyable manner. Find a song you'd love to play, thats maybe a touch out of your ability-range, and hone in on the parts holding you back. Build up technique that way.
#10
I don't really believe in an exercise routine in guitar to be honest. Music is about emotion and having fun, not repeating patterns over and over until you can play them perfectly at 200bpm.
It's all about fun, it doesn't matter who can play the fastest or even the cleanest in some cases, most of the time it's just about what sounds best and who's having the most fun. Don't make it into a chore, it loses it's fun that way.
I play only when i want and what i want, and that way it never becomes a chore, i actually find that this works well as i play everyday for about a 1 1/2 hr or so without ever forcing my self to do so, and my technique i do not feel has suffered as a result of never really doing exercises


Also another thing i find that helps is if when you are trying to learn or get better at a specific technique, for example tapping, is to instead of just practicing drills utilizing the technique, is to practice a song or part of a song you like that uses the technique, that way your learning and playing something you want to play and at the same time your improving at a technique.

and one other thing, you may not like the blues, but the root of most guitar based music is in the blues, and most solo's use bluesy type patterns, so it definitely helps to know a bit about the blues. I mean you may not see it at first, but even heavier bands like metallica or megadeth use a lot of blues licks in their solo's
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#11
exercises are just a way of "working out" for you guitar muscles.
It's the same reason athletes lift weights, even though weight lifting is not what they actually do on the field. It's conditioning for better overall performance.

If you want to play at a very technically demanding level... then exercises as part of your practice will help you gain the necessary motor skills more quickly and efficiently than just learning songs.
That's why people do them.

If you don't have those aspirations, and you're content with how you play now then just play and have some fun.
#12
Find a song that incorporates tekniks you want to improve at.

I usually recommend *Paranoid* by Black Sabbath .
It has a ton of tekniks that are good for practice.

Its one of my favorite warm up songs.
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#13
Quote by cringer
exercises are just a way of "working out" for you guitar muscles.
It's the same reason athletes lift weights, even though weight lifting is not what they actually do on the field. It's conditioning for better overall performance.

If you want to play at a very technically demanding level... then exercises as part of your practice will help you gain the necessary motor skills more quickly and efficiently than just learning songs.
That's why people do them.

If you don't have those aspirations, and you're content with how you play now then just play and have some fun.


It's funny you mention the weight lifting analogy.

There's 2 different camps when it comes to weight lifting. Flashy bodybuilders VS the guys who want to have FUNCTIONAL strength. The guys who only care about muscles lift weights. The guys who care about strength do tons of bodyweight stuff like pullups, dips, etc and they lift weights too but in a totally different way (not to failure).

You may think that the guys who are huge can lift the most weights. But actually, it's the other guys who are stronger and can lift more. Most huge bodybuilders can't even do 15 pullups.

What's my point? Functional exercises beat exercises done with no real musical purpose.

The only exercises you should be doing are ones you created to train yourself to play some part of a song. The TOP guitarists, they seem to all be able to do this, to CREATE their own exercises. I think it was Satriani or someone who said that he likes to write stuff that's really difficult and then learn to play it. So even the "guitar gods" are doing this.

"My practice routine is mostly just learning songs. I try to learn songs like a starving man at an all-you-can-eat buffet." --Paul Gilbert
#14
Depends what you want to do... your technical demands are determined by the music you write or the music you want to learn. No matter what your technical demands are, the approach to technique remains the same; figure out what the hardest part of the lick is for you, then design a little exercise that isolates that part or maybe expands on the idea, then practice it until that part of the lick isn't a problem anymore. Rinse and repeat.

Even though I do not recommend purely technical exercises, they do serve as a decent warm-up. I typically warm up for 5-10 minutes with some chromatic synchronization exercises at a slow tempo, then I'll work on some licks, then I work on writing and learning songs for the rest of my practice period.
#15
dude learn the neck and chords after that play for fun.

if you dont feel like doing exercises dont do em.

What i find really helps me is jamming with people, and to records and youtube videos of other musicians. Just improve and be creative and have fun. Its so much more fun to play something you created than to play something that "should make you better"

If its work you're doing something wrong. No truly great musician got great by playing as a chore. They did it because they just enjoyed playing.
#16
Quote by camaross427

Also another thing i find that helps is if when you are trying to learn or get better at a specific technique, for example tapping, is to instead of just practicing drills utilizing the technique, is to practice a song or part of a song you like that uses the technique, that way your learning and playing something you want to play and at the same time your improving at a technique.


Some exercises are necessary just from a pure technique stand point. If you want to be able to certain things... Rote drills are the only way to master the skills.

If you want to shred with any degree of proficiency learning to play arpeggios accurately is a must.

Anybody can play slop crap at 200 BPM. Learning to do it the right way. Takes a bloody long time and lots of work.

Quote by camaross427

and one other thing, you may not like the blues, but the root of most guitar based music is in the blues, and most solo's use bluesy type patterns, so it definitely helps to know a bit about the blues. I mean you may not see it at first, but even heavier bands like metallica or megadeth use a lot of blues licks in their solo's


You can make blues based stuff fun even if you don't like the blues. Crank up the gain and play pentatonic scales with lots of string bending. It's lots of fun maybe even have some fun with the whammy bar if you have one
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#17
I like the flashy vs. functional strength analogy, but the reason a bodybuilder can only do 15 pullups is because they weigh upwards of 300 lbs :P.

I usually try to learn songs above my skills level and turn licks or phrases from the song into exercises (Technical Difficulties by PG is excellent for this approach).
#18
I use Arpeggios from Hell and create my own exercises from it. and then one day after you master all of the exercises you have "come up with" then you can impress you friends with arpeggios from hell.
#19
Quote by dr83
I like the flashy vs. functional strength analogy, but the reason a bodybuilder can only do 15 pullups is because they weigh upwards of 300 lbs :P.



Just as an aside:

Err, no. The "functional strength" guys are just as heavy. In these cases, the heavier you are, the more muscle you have, so it should all work out proportionally even if you were somehow 500+ pounds of muscle.
#20
The ideal exercise is one that effectively covers all aspects/variations of what you're working on so that there are no gaps or deficiencies. A song is probably not going to cover that, and even if it does there's a lot of "fluff" that isn't contributing towards your technical development. The balance between technical development and learning music thus becomes tilted towards the latter. You could learn multiple songs using the technique in question, but even then you'd find yourself isolating passages from each to learn/develop the technique at which point you are basically doing a set of exercises somebody wrote. As a bassoonist I spent (and still spend ) quite a bit of practice time working through books of etudes in addition to practicing music for solo and ensemble. These etudes are short pieces of music written with the intent of developing a skill. I use those etudes as a basis for writing my own exercises for guitar, and it's served me quite well. Covering the technique in all aspects gives me a greater degree of proficiency and so it's more likely to show up in my writing/improvising and I'm less likely to avoid tricky variations.

Songs will help you develop technique, but there will likely be holes in your technique if that's all you practice. They're better as a motivational/fun practice routine but weaker for developing technique. I'd suggest making your exercises more musical instead of trying to avoid them altogether. That said, the best practice routine will also mix in plenty of music; you are playing a musical instrument after all

Just as an aside:

Err, no. The "functional strength" guys are just as heavy. In these cases, the heavier you are, the more muscle you have, so it should all work out proportionally even if you were somehow 500+ pounds of muscle.

Actually, he's sort of right. Bodybuilding emphasizes hypertrophy over actual strength gain. A serious bodybuilder will be larger than somebody who works out simply to build strength at an equally serious level (note: some athletes do a mix of the two for various reasons particular to their sport. I'm talking about the two extremes of the spectrum here: the goals of pure size and pure strength), yet the bodybuilder will be weaker in all areas. So he's right in that their weight is detrimental in a body-weight exercise such as pullups, but they're also genuinely weaker which holds them back as well.
Last edited by Nightfyre at Apr 9, 2011,
#21
i think my weight lifting analogy was taken too far... the point is that you can indeed do isolated exercises to condition yourself for better overall guitar playing ability - not just for certain songs.

Working on finger independence via exercise is just one example.

Improving finger independence no matter how you do it, will lift your playing for any song you want to learn, and also for improvisation.

If you dislike the isolation exercise approach then don't do it... It's not a law.

That said, there are definitely advantages to exercises. (several already mention above)
Just use common sense... like someone said the goal is not to master an exercise.
(I rarely spend more than 10 minutes on a single isolation exercise)
But I'll do that same 10 minute drill maybe 5 days a week.
I know for a fact that gives me excellent results.

is that for everyone? No - different approaches work for different people.
So to the TS - yeah you will still improve... just keep practicing in whatever way suits you best.
#22
Quote by .Wretch.
Just as an aside:

Err, no. The "functional strength" guys are just as heavy. In these cases, the heavier you are, the more muscle you have, so it should all work out proportionally even if you were somehow 500+ pounds of muscle.


Just buttin in here, what do you mean by "functional strength"? do you mean muscular endurance excersize?

If so then someone who works on muscular endurance will not be as heavy and not as powerful. But will be able to work for a longer period of time. Thats why they can do more pullups. But put him on a bench to try and top the muscular strength guy, no chance in beatin him.
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#24
Why wouldn't you just make "exercises" out of whatever you want to play?

Anything can be an exercise. If you want to sweep pick, come up with some cool sounding arpeggios and create an "exercise" out if it. If you want to alt pick really fast, come up with a cool sounding alt picking run and create an "exercise" out of it.

Take things from songs you like and change it up and create an "exercise". If you want to practice, you have to do "exercises".