Poll: I play it....
Poll Options
View poll results: I play it....
Heel Up
86 73%
Heel Down
32 27%
Voters: 118.
Page 1 of 2
#1
Simple question: How do you play it?

I play it heel up, as it just feels more natural for me. I can get the kicks tighter, more consistent etc.

Poll coming.
RIP Tom Searle.
Last edited by MH400 at Apr 8, 2011,
#2
heel up, though i don't play drums very often, unfortunately.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#3
i play heel up because its much easier for me to hit it harder and faster, but I think that your supposed to play it heel down?
#4
i switch depending on if i want speed for a moment, like i'll quickly switch to heel up when i need to move fast like with double-bass, but heel down any other times
PRS SE Torero | Fender MIM Tele | Jackson RR3

Bugera TriRec Infinium | Randall RH50T

Marshall 1960AV

Soundcloud
Band Facebook
#5
I use both a lot. Heel up for those thrashy heavy songs, but if I'm jamming to some blues, I'll go heal down. I find it a lot easier to get those ghost notes.
Quote by skater dan0
Damn you and your ninja-like modding
#6
Both, as well as heel toe and the constant release technique. Heel down for pretty much everything that isn't metal, heel up to 16ths at 170 bpm which is my max. Can push 8th notes at 240 on either foot with heel toe for blasting and stuff, haven't gotten the technique to where I can use both simultaneously for 16ths though. So I guess overall I'm a heel down player.
#7
I mostly use heel down, but when I need to go fast for a long time I go with heel up.For going really fast for short times, I go back to heel down. Sometimes I'll heel up and use my entire leg, if I need to be really consistent, like something that's just a little to fast for me to do with one pedal.
#9
i chose heel up, but i use both. only reason i picked heel up cause that's what feels most natural to me. i use flatfoot as well =P
#10
Well seeing as I don't play metal or use a double bass I tend to play heel down.
I pride myself on my humility.
#12
Heel up. It's already been said, but it's easier to hit harder and faster.

Quote by mtshark
Well seeing as I don't play metal or use a double bass I tend to play heel down.

I can be like that too.

Well seeing as I don't play jazz or use a single bass I tend to play heel up.

Heel up isn't just for metal y'know.
#13
Heel up for the most part, but it's good to be able to play both.
Spiraling Up Through the Crack in the Sky...

...Leaving Material World Behind...


SOUNDCLOUD

GT - Elite Curbstomp
#14
Mostly heel down. I find it much easier to do clean grace notes and the like heel down. I do use heel up occasionally, though.

DON'T MAKE ME DESTROY YOU!


___________________________________________________


TURN OFF YOUR MIND RELAX AND FLOAT DOWNSTREAM

Quote by Scumbag1792
My God, this must be the smartest/greatest guy ever.
#15
Heel up for pretty much everything. It just happened that way. I can't really play heel down at all.
#17
Heel down, easier to let up to let over tones through instead of 'choking' it.

heel up after a certain rate/bpm.
People in the pit take my post way too seriously.

MyAnimeList
7-String Legion

If you have a question PM me and I will always get back to you.
#18
Heel down for some lighter forms of jazz, and any time when I need to feather the bass. For all other genres (metal, funk, rock, etc.) I use heel up exclusively.
#19
poll is broken. I do both, depends on what I'm playing, like others have said
up for fast stuff, down for mellow, so sometimes both in one song
E-Father to itorch, Andrea55, guitarxo and BlessedRebel15
E-Grandpa to Basti95, davrockist, KitKat555, Mark Roxx, Renegade_Lobo
E-Bro to slash_GNR666
I blog...

Quote by Andrea55


#20
depends on the style im playing.
if im playing something soft without much bass in it i usually play heels down.
but when playing something heavier i play heels up.
overall i do tend to play heels up though.
#21
When I play drums I do heel up, though I don't play often.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400 with Gotoh GE1996T (EMG 85/60)
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#24
I've also noticed that when I do a double beat in the middle of something jazzy or slow that I'll do a heel down press, then lift the heel for the second beat
E-Father to itorch, Andrea55, guitarxo and BlessedRebel15
E-Grandpa to Basti95, davrockist, KitKat555, Mark Roxx, Renegade_Lobo
E-Bro to slash_GNR666
I blog...

Quote by Andrea55


#25
It's not a shortcut at all... getting your doubles really fast is much easier than singles, especially getting them to sound consistent and even. I play heel toe (and use the same motion, only with single strokes, kind of hard to explain) and both hits on either feet sound almost identical when I go fast with it, although there are many that are certainly faster.

And I don't have problems with volume, either, nor do I use triggers. Perhaps you should actually, you know, develop the technique...
#26
Quote by Steve08
It's not a shortcut at all... getting your doubles really fast is much easier than singles, especially getting them to sound consistent and even. I play heel toe (and use the same motion, only with single strokes, kind of hard to explain) and both hits on either feet sound almost identical when I go fast with it, although there are many that are certainly faster.

And I don't have problems with volume, either, nor do I use triggers. Perhaps you should actually, you know, develop the technique...


Ive been drumming for 13 years, my drum teacher started me out on heel toe and I was over that technique 5 years ago. To me when the bass drum is not as loud as the snare and toms you are doing something wrong. If you use heel toe and tell me you have a loud bass drum when you play fast im gonna call you a liar. PS you are the same dude that wanted to debate me over a post I made a while ago, don't remember exactly what it was but this is a subject I have much more experience and know more about then you. I am not going to fight or argue with you, just let you know that you are wrong and im right.
#27
Quote by drummer420
Ive been drumming for 13 years, my drum teacher started me out on heel toe and I was over that technique 5 years ago. To me when the bass drum is not as loud as the snare and toms you are doing something wrong. If you use heel toe and tell me you have a loud bass drum when you play fast im gonna call you a liar. PS you are the same dude that wanted to debate me over a post I made a while ago, don't remember exactly what it was but this is a subject I have much more experience and know more about then you. I am not going to fight or argue with you, just let you know that you are wrong and im right.
Dude, I don't care for how long you've been playing, when I know that I am in the right and that all you've done so far is make asinine comments and fallacious arguments. The part about your feet being as loud as your snare and toms was so ridiculous I'm not even going to acknowledge it.

My bass drum is perfectly audible (especially since such a thing called microphones exist), I never said it was as loud as heel up, but it's certainly not tapping. My heel toe does have power because I practiced it until I got it that way. You can't expect instant results, especially with advanced technique like that, and your abandonment of it demonstrates to me that you really don't know as much as you think you do.

Finally, how the hell can you say you know more than me off the bat? You haven't backed up anything you've said with evidence or really anything else other than baseless statements, and your blind assumptions only compound that. Go take your "knowledge" and say that heel toe sucks to John Longstreth, Mauro Mercurio, Ben Harclerode, Robin Stone, Tomas Haake and Tim Waterson, please. I'm sure it doesn't work for them and that their bass drum would be completely inaudible without triggers
#28
I've seen people (George Kollias) use the heel up technique, and he is astounding at double bass.

Personally?

I can never decide between the two. I end up playing whatever feels comfortable, I mean, I don't drum often though.

Quote by drummer420
Ive been drumming for 13 years, my drum teacher started me out on heel toe and I was over that technique 5 years ago. To me when the bass drum is not as loud as the snare and toms you are doing something wrong. If you use heel toe and tell me you have a loud bass drum when you play fast im gonna call you a liar. PS you are the same dude that wanted to debate me over a post I made a while ago, don't remember exactly what it was but this is a subject I have much more experience and know more about then you. I am not going to fight or argue with you, just let you know that you are wrong and im right.


No one cares if you're right, you're still an arrogant turd in the underpants of society. You know that one turd who can't stand the bowels and drops out of society's ass because it's not good enough for it in there?

That's you. Get out of here, you smell.
#29
Speaking of George Kollias (and since we seem to be on the topic of foot techniques), has anyone here ever tried out the swivel technique? I'm curious to know how it measures up against techniques such as heel toe as far as speed and power goes.
#31
loud, tight, articulate, and heavy = heel up.
quiet, open, resonant, and soft = heel down.
jazz, blues, r&b = up
rock, metal, hip hop = down.
with heal down you have much more contorl over how hard you hit the drum. if you hit hte drum soft, it will resonate and sound like a tom. if you hit the drum hard, it will have a heavy attack and not resonate as much.
#32
Quote by drummer420
All those years I wasted playing heel down, what a waste lol. Heel up = more power and power is important on double bass. The heel toe method is like a short cut. the only time I would recommend using heel toe is if you play on a single bass. I remember back in the day playing Slayer - reign in blood on my single bass using heel toe. You might find it easier to play that way but it's not worth it unless you don't want the bass drum to be loud. Some people can get away with it by triggering.


im assuming that by heel toe method, you mean simulated double bass on one pedal? that can be very useful if you ever want to use the hi hat pedal along with double bass. my percussion instructor does it all the time. we have a double pedal and he uses that too. he can even do the heel toe on both pedals at the same time to basically roll on the bass drum. its insane... he does swiss army triplets on the bass drum during swing jazz songs at 220 bpm. he says its always good to know all the techniques because they all have their bonuses.

hes been doing it longer than you. so, according to your logic, hes right.
#33
Quote by ciano16
im assuming that by heel toe method, you mean simulated double bass on one pedal? that can be very useful if you ever want to use the hi hat pedal along with double bass. my percussion instructor does it all the time. we have a double pedal and he uses that too. he can even do the heel toe on both pedals at the same time to basically roll on the bass drum. its insane... he does swiss army triplets on the bass drum during swing jazz songs at 220 bpm. he says its always good to know all the techniques because they all have their bonuses.

hes been doing it longer than you. so, according to your logic, hes right.
Damn straight.

If you, for instance, watch a Youtube video of an experienced and technically proficient drummer showing his technique, rarely will you see him tell you it is the only way. They always try to be modest and say "in my opinion", or "this works for me personally".
#34
Quote by Speedingfish
Speaking of George Kollias (and since we seem to be on the topic of foot techniques), has anyone here ever tried out the swivel technique? I'm curious to know how it measures up against techniques such as heel toe as far as speed and power goes.
Eh, swivel's ok. I've messed around with it before but I didn't really see the appeal, more than likely it'll mess up your knees in the long run and it's not something that you'd use for slower playing (like 120-140). George only uses swivel on his left foot for faster stuff as I recall, but there will always be some swiveling in your playing when you go fast anyway, whether it be big or small, he's just turned it into an actual motion, instead of something that just... happens.
#37
If i'm triggering my bass drum, i'll play heel down cause there's really no need for the extra power that "Heel-Up" provides (in my opinion). For everything else though that's non-triggered, I play heel-up.
#38
I actually alternate between both, depending on what I'm playing.
Usually, however, I'm playing Heel Up.
DARK_MATTER, Instrumental Post-Metal from Ireland


Bass:
Ibanez BTB 405QM
Ashdown PM600 - Peavey TVX 4x10
Russian Big Muff

Guitar:
Fender Jim Root sig
'99 Stagemaster 7-string
Yamaha F310
Hughes & Kettner Warp 7 w/4x12
#39
I think I play better heel down, but I tire out faster. I probably play heel up more often though. if there's double kick involved it's def heel up, but there rarely is!
#40
I started out with heel down, but recently I have been using more and more heel down for necessary power.
It rules guitarists with an iron fist. It is their mistress, and it is their haunted soul....Kingdoms (of tone) rise and fall and bend to its will. It is the siren. It is the dryad. It is the beautiful cruelty. It is delay.
Page 1 of 2