#1
Im currently sanding down the body of my first electric, and will be sanding down the neck too. I was wondering how much pressure goes on the headstock when the strings are on, as I want to reshape it to make it my own. But I'm not sure how much I would be able to take off :S

So, can anyone tell me how much I could take off? The guitar is a crafter cruiser, if anyone wants to see what it looks like
#2
It all depends on how you want to reshape it. It you leave at least a half inch from the center of the tuning peg you should be fine. You usually dont encounter too much problems unless you make the headstock thinner.
#3
If you're sure the guitar will never get bumped or dropped, you can take off quite a bit. However, bumping the headstock is a very common 'accident'. If it does break, you get to rebuild it even better. That can be very inconvenient or a wonderful opportunity. Is your glass half full? Go for it!
#4
So i could take away the material so that the strings arent actually over any wood? and that would be alright?
#6
Quote by Venomtank
So i could take away the material so that the strings arent actually over any wood? and that would be alright?


Yep take a look at this

http://i1009.photobucket.com/albums/af211/Highlander_Guitars/Parker%20Guitar%20Copy/guitars014.jpg
Gear
Jackson DK2
Ibanez RGR320EX
Guild X82 Nova
Godin Seagull S6

Vox V847
Vox VT40+ / VFS5 VT


Quote by FatalGear41

Right now, there are six and a half billion people on earth who don't care what kind of tubes you have in your amplifier
#7
Is that not reinforced somehow? That being a Parker Fly I'd expect something clever is lurking in there...
Was lacking a decent sig. Still is.
#8
Nope. They just build it with the wood grain orientation correct for maximum strength. Al llong as the majority of the wood is at the base of the headstock and the strings aren't at a crazy angle (such as a jackson) then you should be fine.
#10
Quote by Nephilim777
Nope. They just build it with the wood grain orientation correct for maximum strength. Al llong as the majority of the wood is at the base of the headstock and the strings aren't at a crazy angle (such as a jackson) then you should be fine.


I'd say the neck and headstock being covered in carbon fiber has a pretty big thing to do with the Parker Fly headstock as well.
#11
That may be yes but ive seen a few that are like the parker with out carbon fiber. As long as its a good hardwood such as maple, walnut, bubinga, etc. Although if he is putting a large guage set fo strings with alot of tention that might be a point of caution. If you are already going to re-shape the headstock why not just thin it down a little and put a carbon fiber sheet on it just for extra measure and reassurance?
#12
Quote by Nephilim777
That may be yes but ive seen a few that are like the parker with out carbon fiber. As long as its a good hardwood such as maple, walnut, bubinga, etc. Although if he is putting a large guage set fo strings with alot of tention that might be a point of caution. If you are already going to re-shape the headstock why not just thin it down a little and put a carbon fiber sheet on it just for extra measure and reassurance?

no need for all that stuff
Quote by ChucklesMginty
Yeah Ibanez and Gibson design all their models on their iPods.

Pokémon CYOA
Click here for my electro tunes!

Proud user and abuser of Bugera
#13
I didn't figure it would be needed but hey why not make sure. By the way is that bubinga? Its beautiful!
#14
Quote by Nephilim777
I didn't figure it would be needed but hey why not make sure. By the way is that bubinga? Its beautiful!


Bicolour bubinga pomelle- check my profile, my bass has the same for a topwood.

Completely forgot about blackmachine headstocks and their lack of carbon goodness.
#15
Oh nice Warwick! I always wanted one but never had the money. Is that one of thier neck through models? And what do you think of the Ovangkol wood on the necks. I prefer mapel myself but haven't gotten to play one long enough to know if they have a good sound or feel.