#1
Hi, I have a question about alternate picking exercises and picking exercises in general. My question is, when you practice picking exercises and eventually build speed how does that help you when you want to write a fast solo with a different pattern than what you practice? How are you able to play anything that comes to mind at a decent speed without tons of practice?
#2
Practice your scales with alternate picking and gradually build up speed. After that you can start mixing it up the note in the scale. You won't be able do this at the snap of a finger so, just have patience and practice, practice, practice.
#3
ya pretty much what he said, first practice your timing then accuracy then your speed then your fluidity, then practice showing off onstage :P
#4
Element had a good point. It doesn't happen instantly. Playing IS practicing as long as you are mindful of what you're playing. Try to improv over a metronome and increase the tempo if you can achieve a steady sound.
#5
Practicing exercises won't help your writing ability at all, it will just give you the skill and ability to play things that you write. Writing is influenced by 3 things: Your knowledge of music theory, your creativity, and most importantly what you want to hear.

As for how to play things fast, all you have to do is practice them. But keep in mind that practicing exercises won't really help you with playing songs. Practicing exercises will improve your ability to play said exercises. To play songs, break them down into smaller part and then practice.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#6
Also, if you want the ability to play anything that comes to mind, you kinda have to train you "ear" and the connection to your hands. Meaning, be able to play anything you can think of in your head. A good way to do that is to just try to play any melody you hear, or think of, as often as possible. If you watch TV and you hear a song, try that, etc.
#7
Quote by no bs johnny
Also, if you want the ability to play anything that comes to mind, you kinda have to train you "ear" and the connection to your hands. Meaning, be able to play anything you can think of in your head. A good way to do that is to just try to play any melody you hear, or think of, as often as possible. If you watch TV and you hear a song, try that, etc.


I have a feeling that Stephen Seagull will give you an A+ for this most excellent advice. It's exactly what he would have said, plus or minus this or that. Just thought I'd add that; it's the first thing I thought of right away.
Quote by Pagan_Poetry
Sadly this is Ultimate-guitar, not Simple-guitar. We can't help you.