#1
So my friends ES-335 cherry he bought 3 years ago has a noticeably sweeter NU pickups sound... more airy/bright/chiming

the cherry one

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_songInfo.cfm?bandID=1046030&songID=10500388

sunburst(mine)

[http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_songInfo.cfm?bandID=1046030&songID=10500389

mine has better playability lower action (cuz i got it set up from a really good tech) ( could that be it?) (higher action=brighter tone)?
now he says he has the same model i have the $2800 one, he never swapped neck pickups, so they should both be 57's right?

so i tried matching pickup heights but i still get the same like woody/warm/slightly gritty neck pu sound and not his more "telecaster" type sound

so is this just bad consistency on Gibsons part or normal variance?
the strings on both are brand new d'addario's
.... i think though that it might be cuz the tech who set my guitar up has d'addarios in huge piles he bought years in bulk sitting around so they might have lost some of their tone (but aren't the bags designed to stop that?) and the d'addarios i put up on my friends guitar i bought at GC a week ago

or 3rd option perhaps since my guitar is new and semi hollow it needs to be "opened up"
Last edited by CarmenJuandeago at Apr 8, 2011,
#2
the funny thing is my roommate who play jazz sax thinks mine sounds better because it sounds warmer/woody less trebly....
#3
OK.. these things are made of naturally grown, organic wood. No two pieces of wood are the same. Next, add different years of production, assemblers and finishes. So many variations in associated but identical hardware that the permutations would blow yer mind! Bound to be difference in tone and playability.

hth
D-10
#4
It is perfectly normal, as deltaten said. it's very unlikely that you'll get two guitars that really sound exactly alike, and something i've noticed is it seems like the more you go up the "ranks" as such, into the sort of price range of pro-level gear, the amount of variation from one 'identical' guitar to the next seems to increase drastically.

this is the reason why i always advise people not to buy expensive gear online - it's also the reason you get kids coming on UG and posting things like "i tried a few gibson ES-335s in guitarcenter and only one sounded decent and the rest sucked balls, gibson sucks". (i use gibson as an example because, firstly, this thread is about gibson, and secondly, because so many people on UG are always bitching about them )

i do think perhaps your guitar might take some time to get "broken in" though, but i imagine even then it will still sound darker and woodier than his. i personally liked the sound of yours better, btw

i had a similar thing with my les paul studio faded and my friend's identical one that was stamped only 8 days later - his is noticably sharp and snappy sounding compared to the more warm and "chunky" sound mine has.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#5
Quote by Blompcube
It is perfectly normal, as deltaten said. it's very unlikely that you'll get two guitars that really sound exactly alike, and something i've noticed is it seems like the more you go up the "ranks" as such, into the sort of price range of pro-level gear, the amount of variation from one 'identical' guitar to the next seems to increase drastically.

this is the reason why i always advise people not to buy expensive gear online - it's also the reason you get kids coming on UG and posting things like "i tried a few gibson ES-335s in guitarcenter and only one sounded decent and the rest sucked balls, gibson sucks". (i use gibson as an example because, firstly, this thread is about gibson, and secondly, because so many people on UG are always bitching about them )

i do think perhaps your guitar might take some time to get "broken in" though, but i imagine even then it will still sound darker and woodier than his. i personally liked the sound of yours better, btw

i had a similar thing with my les paul studio faded and my friend's identical one that was stamped only 8 days later - his is noticably sharp and snappy sounding compared to the more warm and "chunky" sound mine has.


but you definetly could hear the difference i was getting at right?
#6
Quote by CarmenJuandeago
but you definetly could hear the difference i was getting at right?

yeah, just a little bit. it didn't sound like a huge difference, but just enough to show that your guitars don't both sound exactly the same.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#7
This thread is going to have people saying that finish color makes a drastic difference in how a guitar sounds.

Is yours newer? I would think that semi-hollow guitars, especially Gibsons would need sometime to break in to get their "right" sound.
#8
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
This thread is going to have people saying that finish color makes a drastic difference in how a guitar sounds.

Is yours newer? I would think that semi-hollow guitars, especially Gibsons would need sometime to break in to get their "right" sound.

i hope nobody is stupid enough to come to that conclusion from this thread

i don't wanna see any "get a red one, red sounds brighter than sunburst" comments. ever. even that one i just typed right there.

i do think the guitar will some time to break in, but it'll still sound a bit different to the other one once it has - just like my les paul and my friend's les paul. (perhaps i'd better not mention that our les pauls are a different colour, lol)
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
Last edited by Blompcube at Apr 9, 2011,
#9
oh dude its definitely the color that makes the guitar..... look at alex lifeson his first es-335 (and he was probably one of the first guys to play heavy with an es-335) he had some tobacco sunburst instead of the regular cherry model
#10
@Blompcube
Y'know, some people claim satin finishes are the best way to go because they allow the guitar to resonate better than poly and nitro finishes. It would make sense that a blue paint would be heavier than a green paint or something like that because green is two pigments and blue is one, thus reducing resonance, but now I'm creating a death trap for us all...
#11
see the best way i can describe it is his 335 sounds more glossed over..... sugary... while mine is like more plain....

his is kind of like a girl with make up on..... and mine is the same girl without
#12
335s are built using glue and thin sheets of laminate. there's so many factors going on there. no two are ever going to sound the same.

plus gibson put in different pickups in them depending on the time they were built or if they were part of a special collection or what not.

Seems like all the one's being sold now use 57 classics. There is one that has burstbuckers.

It's arguable if 2 pairs of gibson pickups will sound exactly the same.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#13
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
@Blompcube
Y'know, some people claim satin finishes are the best way to go because they allow the guitar to resonate better than poly and nitro finishes. It would make sense that a blue paint would be heavier than a green paint or something like that because green is two pigments and blue is one, thus reducing resonance, but now I'm creating a death trap for us all...

surely that would mean gibson faded finishes which are actually "less than satin" would be an even better way to go? there's hardly any finish on them - you can feel the wood grain, and my elbow rubbed away all the red on the corner of the body of my LP studio faded within a matter of months

but i think how it affects the resonance is probably more related to how thick the finish is really.. though i could be very wrong because i don't really know anything about finishing guitars
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#14
@Blompcube
I dunno, there's a guy on youtube that does guitar tips and he swears by satin guitars and how they allow the guitar to resonate. I'm sure there's some weird thing about stain finishes being jelly-like and actually reducing how the guitar resonates.

Essentially the thickness of the finish could factor depending on the color. Black and white finishes would be heavier because they mix more pigments together than primary color paints. And then the actual amount of paint applied.

There's way too many variables for a fair judgement.

TL;DR: That youtube guy is nuts.