#1
Hey

First of all, would like to say that the search bar sucks. I typed in '21 day challenge' only to find the 'Ultimate Guitar Sex Thread no. 6" or something like that...

Secondly, i did read the two main articles on the 21 day challenge, however i have unanswered questions of which i doubt will be answered in such tired threads.

Basically, i, like many others, want to build and work on my speed and accuracy, and aspire to achieve a fast playing ability in order to 'shread' and be able to do other techniques. I would like to be able to sweep, tap etc to a much better ability than i can now, however for the time being ill stick with working on my speed.

Right now, i have a book called DVD Guitar Shread. It goes through about 5 different techniques (speed, legato, tapping, sweeping and a few others), but im just focusing on the speed section. To be specific, inside are two scales (a major and minor - for the sake of it and because the book suggested to, im doing it in the key of A) of which are used to practice your speed. I think the technique employed here is the gradual technique. Basically, im starting out at a small speed, and slowly moving it up. I generally play the scacle 3-4 times perfect, then move the metronome up 8bpm. I can get it to around 198 bpm playing 8th notes. It has improved, at least by 30 bpm. However because of the way im doing it, ill only spend about 10-20 min on each scale. Is this a sufficient amount of time, or should i really be spending an hour on it>

However, today i learnt of the 21 day challenge. For those of you who don't know it......yeah i aint gonna explain it for ya. Heres a main thread below:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1423285&page=1&pp=20

basically, im not sure if i should implement this technique or not. I already have improved with the gradual technique. Although im almost at my metronomes max, so i was thinking of going to a very slow speed and working on playing in 16th notes.
It makes sense, the 21 day technique. Play slow for 21 days until it's etched into your brain, then put it up to normal speed (there is no set speed for scales, but for songs and solo's you get the drift). But i dont want to waste time on something that wont work. Right now im on school holidays, so have plentuiful time to practice. I really wanna make use of it, rather than waste it.

My idea was to practice one scale (say the major scale) using the gradual technique, and the other scale (the minor scale) using the 21 day challenge technique. this wasy i can compare.

Okay, i pretty much answered that myself :P However, there are a few things which i am still not sure about. Rather than make another huge paragraph on it (yeah i got a habit of writing too much), ill dot point em

  • How long should i practice the scale for?
  • Should i have regular intervals of playing and breaks (ie, i hear 20 min play, 5 min rest works)
  • Should i do bursts of speed (play as fast as i can, disregarding accuracy, for 5 minutes, than back to normal practice?)
  • How slow should a play for the challenge (i hear 40bpm is good, i hear 60 bpm, and i also hear that as long as its slower that full speed, but you can deffinately play it accurately all them time, that that is the speed. in that case, i would play at something like 100, but is that fine?)
  • should i after soo many days increase that low speed and keep it there for so long?


EDIT: one last thing, i think my fingers move too high off the fretboard. I probably alree=ady know the answer to this one too (practice really slowty and lift them up as little as possible) but what are some good ways to improve on this?

Thanks anyone for help. There were a few guys in particular who sorta introduced UG to the technique who i would really like to hear from, if anyone knows of these people.

Also, i know its probably been asked and answered millions of times, but im guessing that learning solos and fast licks/riffs at a slow speed and then slowly building them up also works?

I would really like to start soloing, seeing as i have just joined a metal band.

Cheers for any help


and sorry for the mega long essay up there:P
Last edited by flava14 at Apr 9, 2011,
#4
There's no point practicing a scale...the 21 day challenge is an approach to a goal, and in that respect playing scales isn't your goal in guitar.

Use it to box off a song you've been trying to nail, or maybe some useful exercises thatll dovetail into your playing but spending 21 days burning up and down the major scale will accomplish nothing.
Actually called Mark!

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#6
Quote by steven seagull
There's no point practicing a scale...the 21 day challenge is an approach to a goal, and in that respect playing scales isn't your goal in guitar.

Use it to box off a song you've been trying to nail, or maybe some useful exercises thatll dovetail into your playing but spending 21 days burning up and down the major scale will accomplish nothing.


that makes sense then, thanks.

Actually i also had a question on anchoring. Quite simply, i do it, and have only realised that a) anchoring is a bad thing for your technique and b) that i do it

Heres the catch. Im in two bands, not that we play that often. I also have VCE exams coming up next year (sorta like your high school certificate) and other tests in music class, and to start stopping anchoring means you gotta pretty much learn from scratch.

I know it will take time and shit, but im a little confused into whether i should do it or not, how i should it it, and roughly how long it will take (yeah it'll differ from person to person, how much time you spend practicing etc etc)
#8
Anchoring introduces unwanted tension and slows you down, that's a fact. Whether or not that will have any implications on your guitar playing really just depends on how fast you play. and how much you play.

For a typical home guitarist playing moderately fast rock songs then it's probably never going to actually make a difference, although unanchored is still the best way to go. For a pro or dedicated practicer once you start entering the realms of shred things are starting to get a lot faster and more complex, that's when it really can become an issue. You're working a lot harder and everything is a lot more intense, that in turn means the inefficincies of anchoring are magnified and will not only be barriers to improvement, they may also lead to potentially crippling physical problems.

Allowing your hand or fingers to touch the guitar is fine, but using a finger rooted to the guitar body as a fixed reference point is what's problematic.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#9
Don't mean to shit up your thread, but I really must ask.

What is anchoring? Is it fingers pinky/ring fingers touching the guitar? Or only palm or is it any form of right hand contact with the guitar aside from palm muting.
#10
Quote by steven seagull
You're working a lot harder and everything is a lot more intense, that in turn means the inefficincies of anchoring are magnified and will not only be barriers to improvement, they may also lead to potentially crippling physical problems.

Allowing your hand or fingers to touch the guitar is fine, but using a finger rooted to the guitar body as a fixed reference point is what's problematic.


I would concider myself an intermediate guitarist. 7 1/2 playing. Starting to want to shread and flay fast.

Basically, my hands rest on the bridge at all times unless im playing chords or a rythym (i dont for classical, my hand is off and in the correct position, although sometimes my pinky may touch the guitar). This i would assume would greatly hold me back.

what do you mean by touch as opposed to a rooted position? Do you mean just rest it for a small section of music?

i would think that i need to stop it asap, especially if i want to play fast. Purely because im playing songs all the time, would it matter of i practiced me stop anchoring at home with certain things, but when it came to practice for a song of which i must finish (say with a band or an assessment piece), i anchored? Would i actually improve, or because i am still anchoring i am not really teaching myself how not to anchor?

man, all these techniques i havent't developed yet are making me depressed. i have no idea where to start, how to practice, what to practice, for how long to practice, if i can practice multiple things at a time, and how am i to do it with so much other musical things distracting me? Crap

EDIT: It just came to my head then. To me, i dont think it would matter if you anchored whilst playing some power chords, especially if it involves palm muting (which technically isnt anchoring). So if i were to anchor for power chords (ive tried it without anchoring - okay, so im new to playing without anchoring, but it was freaking hard! and seemed unpractical) and not anchor for any lead part, whether it be a solo, lick, riff, fill etc etc, would that be fine?
Last edited by flava14 at Apr 9, 2011,
#11
Quote by HamDen
Don't mean to shit up your thread, but I really must ask.

What is anchoring? Is it fingers pinky/ring fingers touching the guitar? Or only palm or is it any form of right hand contact with the guitar aside from palm muting.


pretty sure its any part of the right hand for a continued amount of time and used as a reference point