#1
Hey there guys, just a random question I felt the need to ask as I explore the world of chord voicings.

When you guys are using different chord voicings, like when going through progressions or aiming for a certain sound, do you memorize the voicings you use? Or do you improvise them on the fly? Would you say its worth doing a bit of both?

Thoughts?

My things:
Bowes SLx7
Washburn WG587
Washburn X40Pro
Washburn X50
Washburn HM24
Washburn WR150
Laguna LE200s
Arietta Acoustic
First Act
Valveking 112
VHT Deliverance

#4
Improvising long strings of new voicings while playing would be super hard. I sometimes come up with a new voicing that I've never played before mid-song but it's rare. Very rare.
#5
Quote by valennic
Hey there guys, just a random question I felt the need to ask as I explore the world of chord voicings.

When you guys are using different chord voicings, like when going through progressions or aiming for a certain sound, do you memorize the voicings you use? Or do you improvise them on the fly? Would you say its worth doing a bit of both?

Thoughts?


I try to learn a few new "grips" every few weeks. So if I am comfortable with a particular movable form of a minor 7, I'll have another few in my pocket that I'll get to use some time.

When I am looking at a tune (Fake books, particularly jazz fakebooks, are great for this) I will try playing the chords I know a few different ways ... I might even try a little voice leading exercise and then really have to learn some new voicings. When I see a train wreck of a chord (Db7#5b9#13) is go "ugh! Altered something" and try to find a simpler chord to use.

One of the greatest players who could just grab beautiful harmonies all over the neck of the guitar was Wes Montgomery. Joe Pass was another guy who could just put his fingers down in the right place. That skill is WAY beyond me ... I've met a few people who can do that -- it's amazing.

A few weeks ago I was learning a progression that ended on a G augmented chord and it was not a voicing I was used to -- I kept missing it. I did what my teacher taught me. Woodshed on that one voicing until it's in the fingers that practice the progression with a metronome and when I flub it .. KEEP TIME! This was something he always emphasized ... you're going to make mistakes but keep time -- even if it means strumming muted strings from a few measures.

Cheers!
#7
i would learn your inversions of the chords you have them all memorized.
maybe to help you out:
if im doing a chord with the melody built in the ill make it so the resolutions are more smooth, along with building the right kind of tension. If im comping during someones solo i try bring the quality of chord out, like if its a b9 chord. put the b9 on the higher strings.



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