#1
As a bit of explanation, I formed my main band back in 2008 or so, and I've joined this new one just recently. I was originally a fill-in guitarist for this new band, just as a way to help them out until they got a new guy. The bassist of my main band had a problem with me joining this new band full time, because he doesn't like when people have two full-time bands, in his words, "double duty never works out". This was the main reason I didn't join full time.

However, the bassist of my main band and the drummer of the new one had a discussion, and it was my impression that they had agreed to me being in the two bands. So cool, I said, I'll join full time. But I just got a message from the bassist saying the contrary, and how they want me to quit my main band and such, which was really just a remark the drummer said once, the other two guys in the other band with me doing double duty, as am I. However, he brought up the time when I complained about the bassist possibly joining another full-time band, which was a while ago, but is still a fair point. I'm completely at a loss as to what to do, so I come to this board, because the advice is typically spot on.
#2
I'm not an expert on the matter by any means, but it seems like you have to evaluate your priorities and go with one band (hopefully staying on good terms with the other), or let both bands know that you're 100% dedicated to both.
#3
From what I can tell, you're asking whether you should quit your main band or not. I'm assuming you're 2008 band is gigging fairly regularly. Really, I think you should just do what you want to do. After all, it's your music career that's at stake.
#4
Quote by AFDGuitarist
From what I can tell, you're asking whether you should quit your main band or not. I'm assuming you're 2008 band is gigging fairly regularly. Really, I think you should just do what you want to do. After all, it's your music career that's at stake.

Actually, not really. I'm asking quite the opposite, whether or not I should quite the other band. I've put way too much time and energy into the first band to quit it (I've written several albums for the band). Neither band is gigging, actually. The other band just started up about a month or so ago, and my main band was delayed for a while by us going and learning our instruments, and we're currently looking for a drummer right now.
#5
Quote by schwinginbatman
Actually, not really. I'm asking quite the opposite, whether or not I should quite the other band. I've put way too much time and energy into the first band to quit it (I've written several albums for the band). Neither band is gigging, actually. The other band just started up about a month or so ago, and my main band was delayed for a while by us going and learning our instruments, and we're currently looking for a drummer right now.


Oh, sorry, misread the band member. In either case, it's up to you. I'd say screw what your bassist says and play in both anyway, but I'm just that kind of person.
#6
Quote by AFDGuitarist
Oh, sorry, misread the band member. In either case, it's up to you. I'd say screw what your bassist says and play in both anyway, but I'm just that kind of person.

Maybe, but I can see where he's coming from. The band is going to go on hiatus when their bassist (the new band's) goes to the military in August. I'm contemplating sticking with them until then, and then after that we'll find a new guitarist, I'll teach him the parts and then leave. IDK though, I'll have to talk with my band's bassist about it.
#7
Is your bassist pretty new to playing in bands?

Y'see, the more experienced musicians generaly accept the fact that people often play in several bands and side projects. Playing with as many people as you can is actualy one of the best ways to develop as a gigging musician, and obviously all bands want the best musicians they can get, and with all the extra people you meet comes 'contacts'.
For instance, I can't tell you how many times I've been making arrangements for a gig and we've been stuck for van or a PA system, until somone says "I know a guy who we could borrow one off." and more often than not, it's a guy in a band that they are jamming with. By playing in several bands, you become a part of a bigger musical community, and that bigger community comes in very handy.
I also can't tell you how many times I've seen a new gig opening happen for one band because the other band have played the venue first and put in a good word.

It's usualy only the beginners that think they should act jealously and have a problem with band members being involved in other projects, it makes me laugh sometimes because they often act as if they are having a personal relationship.

Of course, if both bands are regularly gigging, it can cause the odd problem if the bands are not properly organised, but the proper running of a gigging diary should help to avoid any real problems.
#8
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Is your bassist pretty new to playing in bands?

Y'see, the more experienced musicians generaly accept the fact that people often play in several bands and side projects. Playing with as many people as you can is actualy one of the best ways to develop as a gigging musician, and obviously all bands want the best musicians they can get, and with all the extra people you meet comes 'contacts'.
For instance, I can't tell you how many times I've been making arrangements for a gig and we've been stuck for van or a PA system, until somone says "I know a guy who we could borrow one off." and more often than not, it's a guy in a band that they are jamming with. By playing in several bands, you become a part of a bigger musical community, and that bigger community comes in very handy.
I also can't tell you how many times I've seen a new gig opening happen for one band because the other band have played the venue first and put in a good word.

It's usualy only the beginners that think they should act jealously and have a problem with band members being involved in other projects, it makes me laugh sometimes because they often act as if they are having a personal relationship.

Of course, if both bands are regularly gigging, it can cause the odd problem if the bands are not properly organised, but the proper running of a gigging diary should help to avoid any real problems.



I would suppose. This was both of our's first band. He was invited to join another band about a year ago, which I disapproved of for similar reasons, so I can see where he's coming from. He's one of those "don't take away from the main band!" type of guys. Despite my going back on not joining (I was originally a fill-in guitarist for them, I said I wasn't going to join, but the material was good and the guys were cool), I still have the initial rules, that I won't write original stuff for them, and should gig conflicts arise I'd prioritize my main band.

That was part of the reason I joined, partly for the connections and also because they really did need my help. The other guitarist in my main band has about 3 other projects, although 2 of them are solo. He's overall pretty cool with it, because he sees where I'm coming from.

Yeah, this is how he said the "double duty never works" thing. Even though we could name examples for the contrary. Again, I'd prioritize my main band, but I'd try to keep the shows balanced and such, but it's more just me being there he has a problem with.
#9
you should tell him that you are going to stay in both and if the quality of your work diminishes because of the other band you will quit it....

also I'm kind of confused as to where the other members of your main band stand on this issue?

if they are okay with it then go, as long as the main band is the priority. honestly right now only the bassit in my band is running "double duty", but none of us care because he's commited to our band over the other one. (I was going to be joining another band as well but they fell apart before anything even happened) but yeah just make sure they understand that they are your priority and that you plan on quitting the other band in august.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#10
LOL at "double duty". What does that mean? What a load of crap.

I have a day job which takes up a lot more time than my bands. Does anyone care about that? Nope.

I currently play for 4 bands, and everyone is aware of this, nobody cares. It doesn't affect my work in any band, if it did I'd simply be kicked...although I'd like to think that I'd quit before that happened.

I think that you're just fine with two bands if you do, but this issue is something you REALLY need to talk to the bassist about. Bring it up at practice "How do you feel about me being in two bands? I'm not going to quit one or the other, but if this is something you're going to hold against me, I may as well just quit this one so you don't hold any grudges."

And also:

Quote by Slacker
It's usualy only the beginners that think they should act jealously and have a problem with band members being involved in other projects, it makes me laugh sometimes because they often act as if they are having a personal relationship.




Definitely mate. Some people think that a band is where people should bond on an emotional level, hold hands and all that crap. I just treat it like another workplace. Do the work, do the job, get out.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#11
Quote by AlanHB
LOL at "double duty". What does that mean? What a load of crap.

I have a day job which takes up a lot more time than my bands. Does anyone care about that? Nope.

I currently play for 4 bands, and everyone is aware of this, nobody cares. It doesn't affect my work in any band, if it did I'd simply be kicked...although I'd like to think that I'd quit before that happened.

I think that you're just fine with two bands if you do, but this issue is something you REALLY need to talk to the bassist about. Bring it up at practice "How do you feel about me being in two bands? I'm not going to quit one or the other, but if this is something you're going to hold against me, I may as well just quit this one so you don't hold any grudges."

And also:




Definitely mate. Some people think that a band is where people should bond on an emotional level, hold hands and all that crap. I just treat it like another workplace. Do the work, do the job, get out.


You are such an Aussie! But you are spot on of course.

There's only really a problem if both bands are gigging regularly and you start getting clashes on dates, or you start falling behind in learning the songs. Like the others say most musicians end up in a number of projects and this can benefit all of the bands. Recently the guitarist I do acoustic stuff with joined my main band but we are keeping our acoustic stuff going, there's no problem. If one band has a gig we won't take a booking for the other band. The two of us in the side project are completely on top of the songs for the main band and are always the first to learn new songs. I'd play with anyone who asked me (such a tart) but I'd never let a mate down and I hope they know that.

Talk to your mates, tell them you are committed and if there are problems you'll sort it. I suspect this is more about a personality thing than music.
#12
Quote by AlanHB


Definitely mate. Some people think that a band is where people should bond on an emotional level, hold hands and all that crap. I just treat it like another workplace. Do the work, do the job, get out.


I'm kinda the same way, the band is definately a workplace but I sort of see the band members as more than just workmates, I see them as good friends, (or at least, I do once we've been in a band together for quite a while) but what sort of friend gets jealous because you have other friends? That's just weird behaviour if you ask me.

The 'workplace' metaphor is a good one though. A band that plays the occasional gig and gets paid for it is basicaly a part time job. No employer or workmate in a part time job would normly complain if you were holding down another part time job to make ends meet, so I don't see why people in a band should.

Quote by schwinginbatman
I would suppose. This was both of our's first band. He was invited to join another band about a year ago, which I disapproved of for similar reasons, so I can see where he's coming from. He's one of those "don't take away from the main band!" type of guys. Despite my going back on not joining (I was originally a fill-in guitarist for them, I said I wasn't going to join, but the material was good and the guys were cool), I still have the initial rules, that I won't write original stuff for them, and should gig conflicts arise I'd prioritize my main band.


The proper running of a gig diary should avoid any conflicts before they happen. Each member of the band(s) should have a diary and the person who organises the gigs should have the 'control' diary.
It's important to just have one member of a band arranging bookings, so if another member is asked about a booking, they should point the interested party to the member who sorts out bookings or give them his contact details (this is why bands have business cards)
It's also important that the band has regular sit down meetings, the best time for these are just after a rehearsal. Set aside an hour or so where you can all sit down (possibly with a beer) and just talk about band business. This is where the 'control' diary and everyone elses diaries come out of your pockets and onto the table.
Every person who's gonna be busy because they are away or unavailable for any reason (holidays, family events, gigs with other bands, ect.) tells the person who has the control diary what date they will be unavailable, as soon as they know themselves. Then at the sit down meetings, everyone goes through the control diary together, checking their own diaries against it and writing down all these dates plus the gig dates that whoever holds the control diary has got for the band. That way everybody knows when everyone else is or isn't available for a booking
and it's a pretty much foolproof way of avoiding double bookings if done properly and religiously. If one band gets a prospective gig, whoever books the gigs for that band can instantly check the gig diary to see if you are already booked with the other band or not, and if you are not, and if everyone else is available, then they can immediately accept the gig and inform you and the rest of the band, then you can inform the holder of the other band's gig diary and he can fill that date in as you being unavailable.

This method also means that whoever is booking the gigs can just glance in the control diary and tell the prospective venue if they are available for a particular date or not straight away without having to ring around and check with the rest of the band first, which will come across as very professional.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 11, 2011,
#13
Quote by SlackerBabbath
I'm kinda the same way, the band is definately a workplace but I sort of see the band members as more than just workmates, I see them as good friends, (or at least, I do once we've been in a band together for quite a while) but what sort of friend gets jealous because you have other friends? That's just weird behaviour if you ask me.


Well obviously a relationship will build with any person you spend building a project. It doesn't necessarily need to be a "friendship", but at least a respect for eachother is required for things to go smoothly.

But otherwise what you're saying is right, you do have to be on top of all the songs and make sure that gigs don't regularly clash. I've never been in more than one cover band at a time for that very reason - cover bands seem to get work on Friday/Sat, and regularly too, whereas original bands tend to gig less, and the day is completely random in the week.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#14
You guys are totally right. However, he said he's cool with side-projects, but he has a problem with being in two full-time bands, such as these two. It's a difficult distinction, honestly, but he seems to regard the second one as a full-time band, and to him it won't work out if I'm in both. I keep a pretty organized schedule, so naturally if I have a gig with one there won't be a gig for the other at the same time.

But I don't think his problem with that. He has a problem with straight touring between the two. We haven't gotten that far in either band, but that's the plan. He thinks that touring with this band will be hindered by touring with the other one, which I would suppose comes down to the proper schedule thing.

I suppose I'll say that if major schedule conflicts arise I'll have to drop one of them, but as it is now things are good.
#15
Quote by schwinginbatman
You guys are totally right. However, he said he's cool with side-projects, but he has a problem with being in two full-time bands, such as these two. It's a difficult distinction, honestly, but he seems to regard the second one as a full-time band, and to him it won't work out if I'm in both. I keep a pretty organized schedule, so naturally if I have a gig with one there won't be a gig for the other at the same time.

But I don't think his problem with that. He has a problem with straight touring between the two. We haven't gotten that far in either band, but that's the plan. He thinks that touring with this band will be hindered by touring with the other one, which I would suppose comes down to the proper schedule thing.

I suppose I'll say that if major schedule conflicts arise I'll have to drop one of them, but as it is now things are good.


Just tell him that the other band is a side-project then to make him happy. Or tell him that this band is the side project and that should be fine too
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#16
Does he have any other hobbies? Let's say you guys practice on Tuesday nights and all have day jobs.

What does the bass player do on Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights? Go out with his girlfriend? Go to darts nights at the pub? Collect stamps? Watch birds? Do you know? Do you care?

Then why does he need to care what YOU do on those nights?

The trick is just making sure you communicate so that you don't double-book yourself.

If the bass player's heritage society meeting is on Thursdays, great. He's there, and you're rehearsing with another band. If the heritage society, every now and again has a special activity or function that happens to fall on a Saturday or Friday and might interfere with a potential gig, he needs to let you guys know in enough advance so that you don't book a gig on that night. Same with your Thursday night band, should you get the odd Friday/Saturday gig.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
Quote by schwinginbatman
You guys are totally right. However, he said he's cool with side-projects, but he has a problem with being in two full-time bands, such as these two. It's a difficult distinction, honestly, but he seems to regard the second one as a full-time band, and to him it won't work out if I'm in both. I keep a pretty organized schedule, so naturally if I have a gig with one there won't be a gig for the other at the same time.

But I don't think his problem with that. He has a problem with straight touring between the two. We haven't gotten that far in either band, but that's the plan. He thinks that touring with this band will be hindered by touring with the other one, which I would suppose comes down to the proper schedule thing.

I suppose I'll say that if major schedule conflicts arise I'll have to drop one of them, but as it is now things are good.


Until one or both of your bands are earning you enough money to provide a living or at least making a substancial contribution towards making you a living, neither are what I would consider as 'full-time' bands. If you're just rehearsing once a week and playing the occasional gig, then it's just a part-time hobby. A full-time band is a band that rehearses as much as they possibly can to constantly create new material and plays regular gigs on at least a weekly basis. In short terms, a full-time band is a 'job'.

Calling yourself a full-time band when you don't play regular gigs is like calling yourself a professional carpenter because you occasionaly do a spot of DIY.

As Chris just said, your hobbies are your personal choice, it's got nothing to do with your bassist what you do when you're not playing with the band you are both in. You could be stamp collecting, birdwatching, painting landscapes, playing in a different band or even just getting drunk, if any of these are what you wish to do with your spare time, it's got nothing to do with him.

As for both band's future touring schedules interfering with each other, it's still just a case of being organised and having communication between bands to ensure that tours, like individual gigs, don't clash.
If he's not happy with you being away from home and unavailable because you're touring with another band, then he should be prepared to not have any holidays away from home because that too would make him unavailable for gigging/touring which in turn would make him a hypocrite.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Apr 12, 2011,