#1
Ok so i have this chord progression which i need to analyse. I have done most of it and its been alright but theres a few chords which i have NO idea in how to analyse them.

Im in the key of Gmaj. and what i need to do to analyse them, is figure the mode that the chord scales are in, and what the notes are in each chord. So eg, Gmaj = Ionian G A B C D E F# G, or a little bit harder. Db7 - Lydian b7, Db Eb F G Ab Bb Cb Db. Get it?

The chords i need help with are,

Dbm7(b5), I know its in Dorian, just cant figure out the notes.
Em(maj7)
Em7
Em6
Ebm7

Please Please help, been stressing over this for a while now.

Cheers.
#2
Well, the Db-7b5 is from the Db Locrian Scale, which would be: (enharmonically) Db, D, E, Gb, G, A, B, Db.

E-(maj7) is from the E melodic minor scale, which is E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D#, E

E-7 is Dorian: E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D, E

E-6 is actually another tonic minor chord and suggests E melodic minor. Is there a major 6th in the chord? If so then most likely melodic minor. If it has a minor 6th and is incorrectly labeled a -6 chord then it would just be from E Aoelian, which is: E, F#, G, A , B, C, D, E.

Eb-7 is Eb Dorian. Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb, C, Db, Eb.
#3
Quote by madmaestro
Well, the Db-7b5 is from the Db Locrian Scale, which would be: (enharmonically) Db, D, E, Gb, G, A, B, Db.

E-(maj7) is from the E melodic minor scale, which is E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D#, E

E-7 is Dorian: E, F#, G, A, B, C#, D, E

E-6 is actually another tonic minor chord and suggests E melodic minor. Is there a major 6th in the chord? If so then most likely melodic minor. If it has a minor 6th and is incorrectly labeled a -6 chord then it would just be from E Aoelian, which is: E, F#, G, A , B, C, D, E.

Eb-7 is Eb Dorian. Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb, C, Db, Eb.


wow thanks for the help. Umm yeah the Em6 does have the major 6 in it, in the progression its a line cliché going, Em, Em(maj7), Em7, Em6.
#4
Quote by akaPeach
wow thanks for the help. Umm yeah the Em6 does have the major 6 in it, in the progression its a line cliché going, Em, Em(maj7), Em7, Em6.


The bridge on "God Bless the Child" ("Money, you got lots' of friends") uses exactly this cliche (different key).

Nature Boy -- another jazz standard uses this " ..wandered very far ... very far .."

And then a thousand other songs I can't think of or don't know.
#5
If you're in the key of G major, you can only be playing the G major scale. Modes are not relevant in this context.

What are the chords to your full chord progression?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Can you write out the whole chord progression? Is it G Db7 Dbm7b5 Emmaj7 Em7 Em6 Ebm7, or are they in a different order? This will determine what scales you should use.

It's not about matching scales to chords, it's about understanding the changes and how you should play through them.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
ok the section with the cliché in it is the C section, which starts on the Em. But 2 bars before that in the A section it goes, Gmaj7 | F#m7(b5), B7 | Em | Em(maj7) | Em7 | Em6 | Cmaj7
#8
Quote by akaPeach
ok the section with the cliché in it is the C section, which starts on the Em. But 2 bars before that in the A section it goes, Gmaj7 | F#m7(b5), B7 | Em | Em(maj7) | Em7 | Em6 | Cmaj7


Looks to me like the whole song is simply in E minor.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Quote by akaPeach
thats only a small part of the piece. It is in Gmaj, trust me on that.


I'll have to take your word for it, sometimes it can be deceptive where a song resolves to, especially if you're thinking it's the relative major/minor.

And I'll just re-iterate, G major does not equal G ionian.

Edit: Please post all of the chords (in order) if you have not done already. You can't judge the key of a song with a set of out-of-context chords. I could have a song which goes G - C - D and only post C - D and you won't automatically assume it's in G major.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
Quote by akaPeach
ok the section with the cliché in it is the C section, which starts on the Em. But 2 bars before that in the A section it goes, Gmaj7 | F#m7(b5), B7 | Em | Em(maj7) | Em7 | Em6 | Cmaj7


You have a minor cadence --- ii min7b5 - V7 - i in E minor at F#min7b5 - B7 - Emin -- so this firmly establishes E minor -- which is also the vi of G -- the tune is shifting to the relative minor.

These are classic jazz lines ... you are in G major and you set up the relative minor key, vamp on it by walking a melody note down chromatically -- E, Eb D, Db -- to C -- the tonic of the IV chord. From the IV chord you can go a lot of places but let me guess -- Amin7 - D7 - GMaj7 ?

This is NOT a modal piece -- it is straight ahead diatonic with some chromatic embellishments.
#14
Quote by Sean0913
I'm seeing the same Idea with Blue Bossa used with the m7b5 - I see 2 keys here E min and Eb min. I agree it's not modal at all.

Sean
Yeah that's what it looks like to me.

Still, TS, can you write out all of the changes in one cohesive format? It's hard to tell just by looking at bits and pieces.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea