#1
Hey

Basically, im looking at getting Pro Tools 9. I don't have any recording gear as yet, although soon i will be buying a Focusrite Saffire 6 USB Interface along with a few other pieces of gear. I was looking at getting Pro Tools 9, as Pro Tools is an industry standard and is now compatible with multiple Interfaces, including the one i will be buying

Problem is, i am not sure if it will be able to run on my laptop. Space is not an issue as such, and if i need more, i can clean it up. I'm more worried about the requirements. I'm running Windows XP on a HP laptop, bout 3-4 years old. 2.99 Gb RAM, no dedicated graphics card.

I think it should still run fine, maybe a bit laggy. I just didn't want to spend the money and find out it doesn't work.

Cheers
#2
It could be a bit laggy, but if you're OK with that, it should be fine. However, you should be aware of Pro Tools being a very complicated program to use - you won't learn it by simply noodling around with it. I think it comes with an instructional DVD, though. Just saying that it'll take a lot of time to master using the program. However, as you said, it's the other industry standard, so being able to work with it might prove very useful in the future.
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#3
Heyo

If you wanna save some money, I've got a unopened copy of protools 9 i'm selling for 450 bucks.

My band won it in a contest and we dont really need it so we're selling it.

So there's my offer!
GEAR

Schecter Synyster Custom w/ EVH D TUNA
Peavey EVH Wolfgang w/ EVH D TUNA
Custom Purple Strat
LTD EX400BD
Gibson SG-X
Marshall Valvestate AVT 50h Head
Peavey 4x12 Stereo Cab

Female Fronted Pop/Punk Right HERE For Ya!
#4
for it to be worth it, you have to learn PTs inside and out. otherwise get Reaper or something else cheaper which will do the job plenty well enough.

ProTools is the "industry standard" only in its HD form, which i'd bet a lot of money that you are not looking at getting... LE or M Powered just isn't that special when compared to others like Logic or Cubase.

for a beginner, i would highly recommend starting somewhere a little simpler and cheaper until you get the hang of it and know better what you like and dont like in a DAW.
#5
Quote by The^Unforgiven
It could be a bit laggy, but if you're OK with that, it should be fine. However, you should be aware of Pro Tools being a very complicated program to use - you won't learn it by simply noodling around with it. I think it comes with an instructional DVD, though. Just saying that it'll take a lot of time to master using the program. However, as you said, it's the other industry standard, so being able to work with it might prove very useful in the future.


Quote by sandyman323
ProTools is the "industry standard" only in its HD form, which i'd bet a lot of money that you are not looking at getting... LE or M Powered just isn't that special when compared to others like Logic or Cubase.

for a beginner, i would highly recommend starting somewhere a little simpler and cheaper until you get the hang of it and know better what you like and dont like in a DAW.


Well, online forums suggest that there are too many complications with running it on XP.
I understand it's complexity. Much like what the Unforgiven said, i thought it may have been good to try anyways. I was however told Cubase was pretty good, and i think it can run on XP. Maybe for now ill get Cubase or something else until a) i get a better laptop with Windows 7 and b) get a feel of DAW pragrams (whatever that is :S)

Cheers for that

Quote by rhoadsboy815
If you wanna save some money, I've got a unopened copy of protools 9 i'm selling for 450 bucks.


i would mate, but i can get it even cheaper of eBay. Cheers anyway
#6
If your just going to get a DAW to get the feel before switching to Pro Tools you should prob get something cheap like Reaper. No point in buying Cubase just to eventually change to Pro Tools.

I never understood the love of Cubase. I had Cubase a few years ago (Cubase 4 maybe?) and never realized why it was so great and changed DAWs. Now that Reaper is available for so cheap I don't know why you would ever want Cubase? I guess is prob just preference. If I had been using Cubase a long time and then Reaper came out I prob wouldn't switch.

With all of that said I never used either of those DAWs in huge depth so there is prob more differences than I know
#7
Don't start with Pro Tools. Its kinda complex if you have no clue what your doing. Start with Reaper
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#8
Quote by sandyman323

ProTools is the "industry standard" only in its HD form, which i'd bet a lot of money that you are not looking at getting... LE or M Powered just isn't that special when compared to others like Logic or Cubase.


You should probably educate yourself before you start just spouting off 1 year old arguments.
I've bought, sold, and traded more gear than I care to admit.
#9
Quote by Brendan.Clace
You should probably educate yourself before you start just spouting off 1 year old arguments.


A rebuke with no explanation doesn't do anyone any good. Educate me. Until then, i stand by what i said.

I realize PTs 9 came out and improved on a number of 8's limitations in the LE department, but it still doesn't hold up completely next to the full version of Logic, and as much as I hate to say it, Cubase even has a few charms of its own. As far as "industry standard" goes, pro level studios will either invest in HD, or not invest in all the Avid hardware and use another DAW as their primary.
#10
agreed with sandy.

I'd take Reaper or Cubase over the watered down version of Pro Tools any day.

Actually, I'd take Cubase or Logic even over Pro Tools HD.. but that's not the point.
#11
Quote by TechnicolorType
agreed with sandy.

I'd take Reaper or Cubase over the watered down version of Pro Tools any day.

Actually, I'd take Cubase or Logic even over Pro Tools HD.. but that's not the point.


Alright, i was recommended both Logic and Cubase. Ill be heading down to the massive music store in the city soon to also see what they say.

What about Reaper? Is it really that fine? Or would i actually benefit that bit more buy purchasing Logic or Cubase? Price shouldn't be too much of an issue, eBay has them a lot cheaper. I would have thought that both Logic and Cubase being a 'heavily funded' program as such, as well as them being renowned or well-known products on the DAW or recording market, that they would be quite a lot better, quality wise, and in similarity to something like Pro Tools

Would really like to hear people's opinion on whether Reaper or Logic/Cubase is the way to go.

Is there much difference between Reaper and Logic/Cubase? (btw, i know they're two separate programs, just grouping them together for ease) What are the quality differences between the programs? Whats more simpler? Or more beneficial to start out with?

Oh, and there's all these different versions of programs which sh!#s me, so like whats the difference between LE and M and standard and HD (doesnt Cubase have an LE version?)

Cheers
#12
Regardless of the DAW, it'll all sound the same. It's just about what you prefer and we can't determine that.
#13
Quote by Meelad360
Regardless of the DAW, it'll all sound the same. It's just about what you prefer and we can't determine that.


Yeah i realise it'll be a bit of trial and error between programs. I'm just skeptical of Reaper not benefiting me as much as Cubase or Logic MAY benefit me. Nor will it be as similar to Pro Tools (kinda what i'll be aiming to use in the future/next few years). Really kinda confused.

I guess the main benefit of Reaper is the price. However (im assuming here) it may have less options for plugins and all that other extra crap (i dont really know what plugins are availiable, nor what they can do. from my knowledge they can add to/change sound by giving access to different amp heads, cabs, microphones - and their positioning - pedals etc etc)
#14
Well Reaper was made because the creators didn't like certain things about other DAWs and wanted to make one that would work the way they needed, so there much be SOMETHING special about it... plus, they have a very different business plan than Avid and all the other big companies. i've never used it myself, but i'm sure it will do everything you need it to do and then some.

as said before, it's not important which software you use. It's more about what you put into it and what you do with it.
#15
Quote by flava14
Yeah i realise it'll be a bit of trial and error between programs. I'm just skeptical of Reaper not benefiting me as much as Cubase or Logic MAY benefit me. Nor will it be as similar to Pro Tools (kinda what i'll be aiming to use in the future/next few years). Really kinda confused.

I guess the main benefit of Reaper is the price. However (im assuming here) it may have less options for plugins and all that other extra crap (i dont really know what plugins are availiable, nor what they can do. from my knowledge they can add to/change sound by giving access to different amp heads, cabs, microphones - and their positioning - pedals etc etc)


Either way, there will be free plugins that are almost as good as some paid ones. There are free plugins for pretty much everything.
#16
Quote by sandyman323
Well Reaper was made because the creators didn't like certain things about other DAWs and wanted to make one that would work the way they needed, so there much be SOMETHING special about it... plus, they have a very different business plan than Avid and all the other big companies. i've never used it myself, but i'm sure it will do everything you need it to do and then some.

as said before, it's not important which software you use. It's more about what you put into it and what you do with it.


Fair enough. And yes, i understand that it's all about the work and effort you put into it and all. But you've got to take it from a newbies perspective (not having a go at ya :P). There's so many different programs out there, the only reason why i've mentioned these particular one's was because they were recommended to me (except for Reaper, which i've heard about through this website). And i really have no idea why they are so great, and what distinguished them from each other. Most importantly, i have no idea what programs would best be suited for someone who is pretty much completely new to DAW's. What i would really like to know is what program would best suit a newcomer, what would be the most beneficial to someone new to recording and what would allow me to quickly learn about the different techniques, applications and various other things of recording using a DAW (Disregarding price)? Again, it bubbles down to experimentation and personal preference, but i dont have enough money to be buying three different programs and trying them all out. If it means i have to fork out an extra $100-200 bucks for Cubase or Logic (ill probs eBay it or find it somewhere else cheap), than ill do it

Your first experiences with digital recording and/or these programs would be welcomed.

Sorry if i sound arrogant in any way. I just really want to nut this out.
#17
someone above has probably said what I will.

but whatever you get, you're best off getting it as the regular full version. no light versions or anything.

A lot of DAWs are pretty comparable to each other. If you know how to use them you can get professional results from anything.

Reaper gives you a free fully functional demo so I recommend trying it out first just because you can.
There might be demos for Pro Tools, Logic, and Cubase as well.
I'd look into all that.

I personally don't like Pro Tools because of the limitations in it. Other DAWs feel more.. free.
I like Reaper for recording but I dislike it for mixing because it doesn't have a great single track view editor which is a necessity for me. There's some other flaws like its lack of true panning as well. oh and you mentioned plug-ins. Reaper's stock plug-ins simply aren't too good at all. There are free ones that'll do the job fine, but sometimes it's nice to have a whole library of professional level vsts built in.

In the end, it's about personal preference. There are plenty that swear by Reaper.
It's also incredibly cheap so the lack of great vsts is sort of excused since when paying for a super high priced DAW, you're also paying for the included vsts.

I don't have much experience with Cubase. It seems pretty solid though.
And I have no experience with Logic but I'd probably use it if I could. Just from what I've seen, I think I'd like it.

Just look into videos on YouTube between the different DAWs and try demos out if you can.
See like which one looks most comfortable to you.
#18
I like Reaper for recording but I dislike it for mixing because it doesn't have a great single track view editor which is a necessity for me. There's some other flaws like its lack of true panning as well. oh and you mentioned plug-ins. Reaper's stock plug-ins simply aren't too good at all. There are free ones that'll do the job fine, but sometimes it's nice to have a whole library of professional level vsts built in.

In the end, it's about personal preference. There are plenty that swear by Reaper.
It's also incredibly cheap so the lack of great vsts is sort of excused since when paying for a super high priced DAW, you're also paying for the included vsts.


Just look into videos on YouTube between the different DAWs and try demos out if you can.
See like which one looks most comfortable to you.

Yeah cheers for that. I'd expect the vst's to be pretty crappy from a cheap program, but like you said you can always download more free ones. And i'd assume you can download more free ones for other programs too?

Well i dont have the gear yet, should be getting it in the next few weeks. will deffinately check them out more and try the demos.

I guess i'd be using the same program for all my recording, mixing editing etc.

Thanks anyways
#19
Yup, downloadable vsts play a big part in production. at least imo.
Any DAW can accept them..
except Pro Tools. I think it uses like RTAS or something instead of VST so third-party plug-ins won't be compatible if you only have the .dll.
There's an upgrade or something so you can use them.. but it costs like 50 dollars extra.
#20
oh im loving all of this terminology!

great. ill do some research tonight and over the next week or two
#21
As a Logic user, I feel the need to point out you mentioned Windows XP earlier, and it's late so I've sort of lost focus of the replies here, but you do know Logic is only available for Mac, right?

Anyway, if I was on a PC I'd probably try to like/get used to Cubase or use Reaper. If I could get it for cheap I'd consider PT 9 but only because I've used PT at uni so am somewhat familiar with it too - though I'd never use LE/M-Powered! Pro Tools is only worth it if you're likely to make use of some of the advanced features it has, and don't want much to do with MIDI (which it sucks for). It's also worth pointing out that PT is pretty overpriced at every level, and I think only Nuendo 'out-rips it off' if that's even a phrase.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#22
Quote by DisarmGoliath
As a Logic user, I feel the need to point out you mentioned Windows XP earlier, and it's late so I've sort of lost focus of the replies here, but you do know Logic is only available for Mac, right?

Anyway, if I was on a PC I'd probably try to like/get used to Cubase or use Reaper. If I could get it for cheap I'd consider PT 9 but only because I've used PT at uni so am somewhat familiar with it too - though I'd never use LE/M-Powered! Pro Tools is only worth it if you're likely to make use of some of the advanced features it has, and don't want much to do with MIDI (which it sucks for). It's also worth pointing out that PT is pretty overpriced at every level, and I think only Nuendo 'out-rips it off' if that's even a phrase.


I knew that it was previously on Windows, however i thought it was only Logic 8 if which it stopped (thus a fairly recent Logic). Turns out they stopped at version 5.5.1 or something like that. Cheers for the heads up

That kinda limits it to Cubase and Reaper for now. Pro Tools is deffinately an option later on. It doesn't work on XP, needs a better laptop than i probably have, and is costly.

I dont do MIDI, except maybe for an electronic drum kit later down the track