#1
Hey guys, I was trying to learn tumeni notes earlier, and then i realized that he alternate picked all of the arpeggios. Do you think it would be a bad idea to play all of my arpeggios like this?
#2
Depends on the situation. Sometimes sweeping is just appropriate and/or economical. Definitely a good idea to be able to do both, though, especially if you can tell when to use which.
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#3
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Depends on the situation. Sometimes sweeping is just appropriate and/or economical. Definitely a good idea to be able to do both, though, especially if you can tell when to use which.


yea i know what you mean. cuz i noticed that when steve does his arpeggios they have a really strong attack, whereas if someone were to sweep those arpeggios, it would have a much weaker attack
#4
You could sort of sweep, but actually pick the notes individually. For ascending arpeggios, use all downstrokes and for descending use all upstrokes.

I remember Paul Gilbert saying in a lesson that he uses upstrokes exclusively for picking arpeggios. Personally I use only downstrokes, but I should probably reconsider that.

Also, Steve Morse anchors his pinky which probably helps him alternate pick the arpeggios accurately, but most people would agree that that's a bad idea.
Last edited by SideshowBob180 at Apr 10, 2011,
#5
Well, it probably would be a bad idea to do that all the time, because you will be limited in speed. Sweeping produces a different tone than alternate picking, so you'll have to factor that in as well.

Nonetheless, you should practice alternate picking arpeggios since it will help with string skipping, and as you probably already knew, Tumeni notes serves as a nice etude for this.