#1
ok everyone, yesterday i decided to de-fret me acoustic guitar.
my acoustic is a briarwood (peavey brand), and its pretty low quality, so its basically my experiment guitar.
http://www.drumza.com/product/Peavey-Briarwood-DR-5CA-EQ-Acoustic-Guitar.html
my stepdad is an amazing carpenter, so i had him help me and it came out fine. it was ALOT easier than i thought. (use soldering iron to heat up frets, rip frets out)

i have a couple questions on how to use my microtonal capabilities to the fullest potential.

1. what are some other intervals that are not 100% correct sounding in the western tonal system thing?
ex: major third sounds more natural when it is flatted by a few cents. i have also heard the minor third sounds better slightly flatted.

2. are there any microtonal chords i could mess around with?
ex: major chord with slightly flatted third and slightly sharped 5th.

ive been messing around in DADGAD, and its alot of fun to play bluesy slide guitar riffs over a 12 bar blues, because my finger is now my slide.

FYI if you are intrested in defretting your acoustic just know that the sustain is basically nothing, AND all notes played on high B and E strings sounds constantly palm muted. i started with horrible action, but now it is even worse action PLUS the fact that i have to press down the strings way harder to sound the note, because there is no metal on metal contact. but on the other hand, it is a blast to mess around with.

tldr: i now have a fretless acoustic, does anyone know of any other intervals that sound better slightly flatted or sharped? and does anyone know of any weird exotic chords that are impossible on a normal 12 tone per octave instrument?

all in all, it is a ton of fun to mess around with, and i recommend that anyone who has a shitty acoustic laying around that never gets played play try it. (if you EVER want to play normal open chords on your acoustic again, dont do it.)
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Apr 10, 2011,
#2
For me, I've found the only time micro tonal music is accessible is when it's played by instruments capable of producing long droning tones and sustained notes ala Klaus Lang, and when used occasionally in Indian music. I have no idea how you're going to get this sort of thing to work with an acoustic, but I'd like to hear the results.
#3
Quote by griffRG7321
For me, I've found the only time micro tonal music is accessible is when it's played by instruments capable of producing long droning tones and sustained notes ala Klaus Lang, and when used occasionally in Indian music. I have no idea how you're going to get this sort of thing to work with an acoustic, but I'd like to hear the results.

so far, it seems like i will never get a long droning note on this guitar.
no frets, plus the fact that it was a crappy acoustic to start with makes it impossible.
ive been searching google and wikipedia, and i just found a grid type thing that plays all the different intervals in a 24 tone per octave tuning.
it sounds very interesting, but i have to admit some of the intervals just sound horrible.
like 60% down the page youll see the grid and you can listen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quarter_tone

for example: the 23rd note (the note between a major 7th and the octave. imagine bending almost to the octave and holding that note) sounds horrible. it would be sooo easy to create like a halloween scary track with these intervals haha.
however, the 21st note (note directly between a major 7th and a minor 7th, cleverly named neutral 7th haha) sounds really cool.
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Apr 10, 2011,
#4
Adjusting an interval to fit a meantone system of tuning isn't really microtonal. As for actually executing this, I think it would be exceedingly hard to coordinate, for a result that most people will hear as an out of tune major chord.
#5
jazz rock feel, i completely understand.
i knew it would be nearly impossible for me to "create" a new chord outside the normal 12tpo, and have it sound good, but its sure as hell fun trying.

as i said before, some intervals sound really cool: note 21 in 24 tone per octave tuning, the note between a major and minor seventh sounds awesome.
and some sound HORRIBLE: note 23 (note between normal major 7th and octave.
the note between a normal major third and a perfect fourth also sounds so bad.
when i hear that note it makes me cringe.

EDIT: i vote that the "septimal quarter tone" (quarter step away from the root), combined with the root note officially be named the death metal chord.
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Apr 10, 2011,
#6
I have a professor at my school who loves that kind of stuff, he often gives lectures on other available tuning systems and plays frequently on fret less instruments.


Here's his website, you might find it interesting:
http://www.themichaelvicktrip.com/
#8
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
jazz rock feel, i completely understand.
i knew it would be nearly impossible for me to "create" a new chord outside the normal 12tpo, and have it sound good, but its sure as hell fun trying.


I'm not saying that it's impossible, in fact I encourage you to try, but going at it in terms of changing x interval to be slightly sharp or flat isn't the way to go about it, that's all.
#9
nmitchell076: your professors stuff is very interesting, but WTF?
his name is Michael Vick, and he made his personal website colors be white, black and red?

he must never watch the news OR the NFL, or he just has an awesome sense of humor.

jazz rock feel: how would you go about creating your own chord? i know a ton of music theory (or atleast i like to think i do, but ive been proven wrong), so its hard for me to just "start with a clean slate", and try to make a completely new chord with NO normal intervals.

i mean, the 12 tone per octave tuning was designed for a reason, and with all my knowledge of it, and from learning from it, its hard to step outside if you get what im saying.
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Apr 10, 2011,
#10
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
nmitchell076: your professors stuff is very interesting, but WTF?
his name is Michael Vick, and he made his personal website colors be white, black and red?

he must never watch the news OR the NFL, or he just has an awesome sense of humor.

judging by the look of the website, I would say he probably was too lazy to change it, since it looks like the basic format is pretty old
#11
i just searched youtube for "fretless acoustic" videos, and apparently fretless acoustic basses are MUCH more common than guitars.
also, i realized very quickly that defretting my acoustic DOESNT make me sound like Guthrie Govan in thes video.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PyOZhgQnvU&feature=related

holy jesus he makes that fretless sing.


EDIT: this obviously isnt why i made this thread, but heres another awesome fretless video:

its tymon from cynic.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7s5OK3J4BYg
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Apr 10, 2011,
#12
Quote by griffRG7321
For me, I've found the only time micro tonal music is accessible is when it's played by instruments capable of producing long droning tones and sustained notes ala Klaus Lang, and when used occasionally in Indian music. I have no idea how you're going to get this sort of thing to work with an acoustic, but I'd like to hear the results.



I'm guessing it would be more or less oud-like.
#16
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Adjusting an interval to fit a meantone system of tuning isn't really microtonal.


If it isn't strictly 12-edo, it qualifies as microtonal, even if it's just another means of realizing conventional theory.
#17
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
i just searched youtube for "fretless acoustic" videos, and apparently fretless acoustic basses are MUCH more common than guitars.
Yeah I have a fretless acoustic bass (images on my profile), and I love it. It just seems much more natural, and it allows you to actually get those damn thirds in tune
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#18
try the flattened sixth flattened another quarter tone, i really like this sound, i used to use it in like normal tonal songs, it was the only one other than the blue third which i found to be of any use, try it out, it's nice!
#19
Quote by gavk
try the flattened sixth flattened another quarter tone, i really like this sound, i used to use it in like normal tonal songs, it was the only one other than the blue third which i found to be of any use, try it out, it's nice!

this really confused me at first, but i think i understand what your saying now.

are you saying the note basically between a fifth and a flat 6?
so in C, the note between G and G#?
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#20
I think you first ought to learn how to play in tune before you start going into the notes in between. And record yourself often, just because you might think you sound great at the moment, it might not sound the same when listening to a recording of it.
#21
^ Totally forgot about that, learn to play in tune before you learn the notes inbetween.

On another not Pillo, you got an MP3 of 'rummaging' from your profile? It has such an awesome nostalgic vibe, and like I've previously said, could be in Blade runner or something