#1
Hi,
This is my first time posting.

Basically, what key (or keys) is John Mayer's In Repair in?


The chords go A//G//D//// which would make me believe that it would be in Bmin(Dmaj). However, on the guitarpro version, it has the vocal melody in the key of F#min(Amaj). Which is it? or is it both?

Then for the solo, I realize there is a key change and the chords are D//C//G////
The first few riffs of the solo want to make me think that it is in Bmin; however when it speeds up, it seems like it is in Dmin. Which is it?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ho6pqXrFFLM
http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/j/john_mayer/in_repair_tab.htm
http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/j/john_mayer/in_repair_guitar_pro.htm

Thank you so much! I'm just insanely curious as I cannot figure this out.
#2
Pretty sure its in A

You don't have to follow the exact chords that are in the key, it is about where the resolve is

I think lots of songs switch between their relative major/minor in places, ie the verse may be resolving to the A major, but chorus could be resolving to F#m

Not a huge theory guy, know very limited, but I think the chorus may be in F#m while the verse is in A major

I'm not 100% certain but I think that Kansas' dust in the wind is kind of similar to that (not the song but they way they use the key, except that song is in C)
#3
Ok I understand how it could be the relative major/minor but how does he get away with changing the key to something that isn't the relative major/minor? Like in the solo when it goes from Bmin(Dmaj) to Dmin(Fmaj) and the chords stay the same (there's no noticeable key change).

I don't know a ton of theory but is it possible that the chord progression of D//C//G//// fits both into Bmin and Dmin? Therefore the key is somewhat ambiguous and he can use both of them...that is just my guess.
#4
The A G D part is in A.

The Bm E turnaround is also in A.

So is the F#m Bm E part.

The F Bb A part is in D minor, which then switches to D major for the D C G part for the solo.

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#5
Quote by food1010
The A G D part is in A.

The Bm E turnaround is also in A.

So is the F#m Bm E part.

The F Bb A part is in D minor, which then switches to D major for the D C G part for the solo.

If I'm missing something, I'm sorry, but I'm running late to get somewhere.

I always thought it was A mixolydian Why am I wrong?
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#6
I have no idea what song this is (not a John Mayer fan) but from what is said here A mixolydian would be right.
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#7
Quote by Venice King
I always thought it was A mixolydian Why am I wrong?


Quote by rawkandrowl
I have no idea what song this is (not a John Mayer fan) but from what is said here A mixolydian would be right.


The reason this song is not in A mixolydian is because it is not a modal song. Whilst something like an A - G vamp more strongly suggests A mixolydian, but when you employ all the other chords that the song uses, it creates a very strong resolution to A major, which is in fact the key (with the exception of a short key change in this particular song). Where you have a "key", you cannot have a "mode".

So where does the G chord come from? It's borrowed from the parallel minor (A minor).

To make things even more confusing, as the G note is not in the A major scale, so it's wise to flatten the 7th (G#) when playing over this chord. When you use the A major scale with a flattened 7th, the resulting notes are the same as those contained in *drum roll* the A mixolydian scale. This is a good example of using modes in a tonal setting to visualise accidentals over out-of-key chords.
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