#1
Hey guys, just have a few questions about drumming that I hope you can answer, this place looks deserted but I'll try.

Basically I'm bored as shit of being a guitarist and I want to start drums, I already have a really cheap shitty drumset that used to belong to my cousin.(this one ).

First question: The drums sound like shit obviously, but some people told me that I can just change the heads.. But I don't really know what kinds are the best (I heard Remo was good).. I have about 150 euros to spend but I might get more once I sell my guitar. The cymbal sounds like an elephant taking a shit, but my friend is getting me a really good Zidjian one so that's all good.

Also, I read that most people's drumsets sound bad because they're not tuned. Now, I have the key but I just can't figure out how to tune. I've seen some youtube tutorials but they didn't really help since my snare and bass drum always sound bad no matter how much I tighten or loosen it.

Second question: My drumset is at my parents house and I only visit them once in a while since I study uni in another country. What's the best way to practice without actually having a drum set? I've seen some practice pads at my local music store but will they help?

Thanks.

TL;DR: I have this drum set, but it sounds like shit. I can't tune it and don't know what heads to change.
and what's the best way to practice drums with no drums..?

Edit: Also, if anyone could point out a good website with drum tutorials I would appreciated. Youtube is really helpful but if there's more then I'd like to see it.
Last edited by Portuguese_boy at Apr 11, 2011,
#2
put on some remo heads, will make a big diffrence.
Drum drum drum away!
#4
Quote by Deadlock Riff
http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/id5.html

^^ Much better than i could ever hope to explain to you.


+1 on that.

In response to your last question, I'd suggest just buying a cheap electric kit so you're actually playing drums as opposed to practicing with practice pads (Though it's still a good idea).

In terms of tuning there are a few videos I want to show you, I'll just place the first parts. They helped me in tuning my drums.

Tuning your snare

This links you to a vid of two drummers putting new heads on the a whole kit.
It's taken from their live lesson a few months back and both vids are around 50 minutes long so I suggest finding some free time before doing so.

Video here!
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#5
Quote by beverboy
put on some remo heads, will make a big diffrence.

Yep, figured that, thanks for the suggestion.


Quote by Deadlock Riff
http://home.earthlink.net/~prof.sound/id5.html

^^ Much better than i could ever hope to explain to you.


Thank you, just had a quick read and that website looks amazing, bookmarked it.. I'll read it in detail later today.

Quote by Niiko
+1 on that.

In response to your last question, I'd suggest just buying a cheap electric kit so you're actually playing drums as opposed to practicing with practice pads (Though it's still a good idea).

In terms of tuning there are a few videos I want to show you, I'll just place the first parts. They helped me in tuning my drums.

Tuning your snare

This links you to a vid of two drummers putting new heads on the a whole kit.
It's taken from their live lesson a few months back and both vids are around 50 minutes long so I suggest finding some free time before doing so.

Video here!


You have no idea how helpful those videos are, thanks a lot.
I can't get an electric kit because I live in uni halls and my room is small as shit.
#6
If possible, you might want to invest in something called a Drumdial (runs for about 60 USD). While it's very important to be able to tune your drums on the fly by ear, Drumdial will pretty much tell you the pressure of each part of the head and help you get it entirely in tune, and eliminates a lot of the guesswork involved. Very handy tool.
Last edited by Steve08 at Apr 12, 2011,
#7
As for tuning, look for vids by Bob Gatzen on youtube - I bought his DVD and it's DAMN worth the money.

Remo pinstripes or Ambassadors are really good all-round heads, for that matter... For kick, it's Evans SKII for me, all the way.
You like it
#8
Quote by Steve08
If possible, you might want to invest in something called a Drumdial (runs for about 60 USD). While it's very important to be able to tune your drums on the fly by ear, Drumdial will pretty much tell you the pressure of each part of the head and help you get it entirely in true, and eliminates a lot of the guesswork involved. Very handy tool.


Ahhh, something that will save me a lot of trouble, I was hoping that existed. Thanks for telling me about it.

Quote by linus.d
As for tuning, look for vids by Bob Gatzen on youtube - I bought his DVD and it's DAMN worth the money.

Remo pinstripes or Ambassadors are really good all-round heads, for that matter... For kick, it's Evans SKII for me, all the way.


I'm watching his snare drum tutorial and it looks really good, he actually explains how it works and not just how to tune. I like that. Again thanks for sharing.

Gotta be honest, wasn't expecting this much quality help.
Thanks everybody.
#9
Quote by Portuguese_boy
Ahhh, something that will save me a lot of trouble, I was hoping that existed. Thanks for telling me about it.


I'm watching his snare drum tutorial and it looks really good, he actually explains how it works and not just how to tune. I like that. Again thanks for sharing.

Gotta be honest, wasn't expecting this much quality help.
Thanks everybody.


His tips on the kick is... Well, I couldn't get my kick as I wanted it before I saw it...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ga8Q12mKYxI
You like it
#10
on the question about a practice pad, i think it can certainly be helpful and i really need to use mine more often. while you wont be able to make nice tunes with them, theyre great for warming up and technique practice. i think you can practice hand coordination with them and doublestrokes. take this from me, practice those doublestrokes. i still cant do them very fast and theyre very good to be able to do, no matter what genre your planning on playing.
#11
Quote by Steve08
If possible, you might want to invest in something called a Drumdial (runs for about 60 USD). While it's very important to be able to tune your drums on the fly by ear, Drumdial will pretty much tell you the pressure of each part of the head and help you get it entirely in true, and eliminates a lot of the guesswork involved. Very handy tool.


I'll say +1 for this but it won't get it entirely in tune. It gets you in the right area which is great for quick tuning. But you need to do the fine tuning by ear.
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#12
On topic of the practice pad; learn your rudiments:
http://freedrumlessons.com/drum-lessons/drum-rudiments.php

basically these are "patterns" that, mixed and matched freeley, make the foundations of every beat.

The basic "Must-knows" are the single stroke, the double strokes, flams, paradiddles and the drag.
15 mins of rudiments a day keeps the doctor away!+
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#14
Quote by Portuguese_boy
^Bookmarked

Some of those patterns look hard as shit to remember..



Once you get the basic ones down it becomes a little easier to remember the rest.
You'll hear and feel each one a little differently... Atleast to me they are.... Hell I only really use doubles and singles anyway
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#15
Start by playing songs on the radio.

You dont need to be good, just practice keeping a solid rhythm. Throw in some fills if you want too. Look online for tutorials on how to hold the sticks (by far the most important thing). Then the practicing comes when your not playing to songs. Like what linus.d said...those patterns (rudiments) are the basis for most beats. I'm a drum instructor by day, so feel free to ask me any questions!
#16
Quote by withconviction
Start by playing songs on the radio.

You dont need to be good, just practice keeping a solid rhythm. Throw in some fills if you want too. Look online for tutorials on how to hold the sticks (by far the most important thing). Then the practicing comes when your not playing to songs. Like what linus.d said...those patterns (rudiments) are the basis for most beats. I'm a drum instructor by day, so feel free to ask me any questions!


That's exactly what I've been doing, I learned a Shinedown song yesterday, easiest thing I could find.
I'm having more trouble making my drum set actually sounding good, but I've been reading the awesome links and tips you guys posted so it's all good.. Plus I already went through the exact same thing when I started playing guitar a couple of years ago.

I'm also getting extremely good at drumstick twirls