#1
So, I've got this chord progression that I enjoy. It's very somber and mellow in mood, but I want the bridge to seem like a realization and kind of pick up into a happier/hopeful feel. Here's my problem: I can't figure out how to do it. I mean, are there certain types of chords that give off that feel or is it just a matter of re-feeling out the chords already used?

Thanks guys!
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."
#3
I'm only somewhat familiar with theory. "Tonic" meaning?

I'm in D Major by the way, if that helps anything.
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."
#4
Utilize other instruments to make it more dramatic. Ie, more velocity on the drums, stronger bass lines.
#5
it's a long explanation but i'll do it.

as you probably know, there are 8 different notes in a scale including the octave.
so for each note in the scale, there's a triad (chord of 3 notes)
the tonic is always the 5th note of that scale (A in your case) and it's essentially a key change to that note (again, A in your case).
it should make it more uplifting and give a sense of movement
PRS SE Torero | Fender MIM Tele | Jackson RR3

Bugera TriRec Infinium | Randall RH50T

Marshall 1960AV

Soundcloud
Band Facebook
#6
Quote by Unholy.Daemon
it's a long explanation but i'll do it.

as you probably know, there are 8 different notes in a scale including the octave.
so for each note in the scale, there's a triad (chord of 3 notes)
the tonic is always the 5th note of that scale (A in your case) and it's essentially a key change to that note (again, A in your case).
it should make it more uplifting and give a sense of movement

lolwut?

The chord built off the 5th degree of the scale is the dominant, the chord built off the 1st degree is the tonic.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#7
sorry yeah, i meant dominant.. not tonic
it's been a while since i've had to use this kinda theory xD
PRS SE Torero | Fender MIM Tele | Jackson RR3

Bugera TriRec Infinium | Randall RH50T

Marshall 1960AV

Soundcloud
Band Facebook
#8
Listen to and analyze music, that's the only way you're going to fully understand how to get the sounds you want and manipulate them. There are no shortcuts.
#9
Use chord voicings that convey the mood you're looking for - just as a simple way of looking at it, I'll give you a basic idea of chords and their sounds.

Major - I tend to see this as a Full neutral sounding chord. Some describe it as happy, I don't because I cant hear it as happy, though it can be used that way.

Minor - I see this as a full sounding darker chord.

Major 7th I see this as a girlfriend chord or love song chord, very beautiful.

Minor 7th - a less heavier chord than the minor, and somewhat pretty and wistful

Dominant - an unstable tension producing chord that wants to go somewhere.

These are just basic characterizations to get you started.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 11, 2011,
#10
use IV iibdim7 I i VI7 V i. happiest progression ever!
Last edited by gavk at Apr 11, 2011,
#11
Use minor chords. Maybe make the bridge in D minor and have the last chord of the bridge be A major. It's common to make the fifth a major in a minor key and that would probably sound nice going into D major because it is the fifth in that key.
#12
Quote by DaysofGrace
I'm only somewhat familiar with theory. "Tonic" meaning?

I'm in D Major by the way, if that helps anything.



If you are in D major (D E F# G A B C#) then the tonic is D.

D = Tonic
E = Supertonic
F# = Mediant
G= Subdominant
A = Dominant
B = Submediant
C# = Leading Tone

One can harmonize the D major scale in triads:

D major = D F# A
E minor = E G B
F# minor = F# A C#
G major = G B D
A major = A C# E -- often a flatted 7th is added creating A7 = A C# E G
B minor - B D F# -- this is also the "relative minor" chord to D major
C# diminished = C# E G, often a flat flat 7 is added (C# E G Bb) or a flat 7 is added to created a "half diminished" or minor7 flat 5 chord (C# E G B )


Of course, just because the scale is laid out like that and harmonized like that does not mean you have to play those chords and only those chords ... but they give you a starting place when it comes to understanding what the D Major scale is all about and some ways to play around with it.

Cheers!
#13
Quote by griffRG7321
Listen to and analyze music, that's the only way you're going to fully understand how to get the sounds you want and manipulate them. There are no shortcuts.
Yep.

The general answer for how to change the feel of something is to use dynamics, rhythmic/tempo changes, and even timbre changes. Usually these can alter the mood a lot more effectively than just using different chords.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#14
Quote by food1010
The general answer for how to change the feel of something is to use dynamics, rhythmic/tempo changes, and even timbre changes. Usually these can alter the mood a lot more effectively than just using different chords.


I'm leaning in this direction too. I'm very surprised that a rhythm/tempo change wasn't suggested earlier.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#15
Quote by Sean0913
Use chord voicings that convey the mood you're looking for - just as a simple way of looking at it, I'll give you a basic idea of chords and their sounds.

Major - I tend to see this as a Full neutral sounding chord. Some describe it as happy, I don't because I cant hear it as happy, though it can be used that way.

Minor - I see this as a full sounding darker chord.

Major 7th I see this as a girlfriend chord or love song chord, very beautiful.

Minor 7th - a less heavier chord than the minor, and somewhat pretty and wistful

Dominant - an unstable tension producing chord that wants to go somewhere.

These are just basic characterizations to get you started.

Best,

Sean


interesting because I describe the major chord as "happy" or triumphant. yet some very sad songs I know have major tonalities. interesting you phrase it that way.

of course, I suppose it all depends on the chords function in the progression. but I think I'm picking up what you're putting down.
#DTWD
#16
Quote by primusfan
interesting because I describe the major chord as "happy" or triumphant. yet some very sad songs I know have major tonalities. interesting you phrase it that way.


In fact two of the most popular songs for funerals "Tears in Heaven" and "Chasing Cars" are both in major keys.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#17
Quote by AlanHB
In fact two of the most popular songs for funerals "Tears in Heaven" and "Chasing Cars" are both in major keys.


Tears in Heaven was actually the inspiration for the song I'm working on. Thank you for pointing out that it was in a major key. I wasn't sure as I looked at it.
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."
#18
If you want an uplifting sound try sus4 chords.

If you do hear minors as sad and majors as happy then sus4s are ecstatic!
#20
Quote by Jehannum
If you want an uplifting sound try sus4 chords.

If you do hear minors as sad and majors as happy then sus4s are ecstatic!


Err, wouldn't a sus2/4 be "meh"? It would be the same chord regardless of major or minor.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#21
Quote by AlanHB
Err, wouldn't a sus2/4 be "meh"? It would be the same chord regardless of major or minor.


Well, like with a sus2, the 3rd is lower than the major and the minor chord, so, I could see how it'd be mellower. And the inverse idea for the sus4.
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."
#22
Quote by DaysofGrace
Well, like with a sus2, the 3rd is lower than the major and the minor chord, so, I could see how it'd be mellower. And the inverse idea for the sus4.


Well the sus2 + sus4 would be the same, as the 2 and 4 are the same regardless of major or minor. It's not mellower, just that if you use the generic major = happy, minor = sad, sus2 + sus4 would have to be exactly in the middle of happy and sad as it has qualities shared by both major and minor, whilst alone suggesting neither of them.

I really don't like these chord things anyway. What does an A major sound like in the key of D major? What about D minor? Different? Geez, there must be more to it then a generic chord then. What if you play it in a fast song? What about a slow song?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#23
Quote by AlanHB
I really don't like these chord things anyway. What does an A major sound like in the key of D major? What about D minor? Different? Geez, there must be more to it then a generic chord then. What if you play it in a fast song? What about a slow song?


I have to agree with you here. It all depends on context.
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."