#1
So I've been trying this program called Guitar Speed Trainer, and it's pretty cool, but I'm hesitant about one thing.
Basically, the program makes you play an exercise over and over a set amount of times, at varying speed. The manual describes something referred to as a "ideal speed curve", which is: start at just below the "Tiring" level, go through it and up through the "broken" level until you reach the "Impossible" level and then go back down and play it a few times at the middle of "Tiring".

What I've heard from other people is that it's a bad idea to rush to higher speeds since you'll end up with sloppy play instead of learning to play cleanly. This program however "forces" you to go to a level you can't handle, after which it lets you play at an intermediate level, which - according to the manual - is where most of the gain is.

So what are your thoughts on this? Is it a bad idea to practice like this?
#2
Quote by Ahteh
So I've been trying this program called Guitar Speed Trainer, and it's pretty cool, but I'm hesitant about one thing.
Basically, the program makes you play an exercise over and over a set amount of times, at varying speed. The manual describes something referred to as a "ideal speed curve", which is: start at just below the "Tiring" level, go through it and up through the "broken" level until you reach the "Impossible" level and then go back down and play it a few times at the middle of "Tiring".

What I've heard from other people is that it's a bad idea to rush to higher speeds since you'll end up with sloppy play instead of learning to play cleanly. This program however "forces" you to go to a level you can't handle, after which it lets you play at an intermediate level, which - according to the manual - is where most of the gain is.

So what are your thoughts on this? Is it a bad idea to practice like this?



I've used similair methods like trying to play a super hard song than throwing on some ACDC to take a break.lol I think it works pretty good. Its kinda like lifting weights. Bust some butt on the hard/heavy stuff and the light stuff is a breeze....
#3
Quote by dopelope
I've used similair methods like trying to play a super hard song than throwing on some ACDC to take a break.lol I think it works pretty good. Its kinda like lifting weights. Bust some butt on the hard/heavy stuff and the light stuff is a breeze....


Yeah I got the same idea, about the weight lifting analogy.
#4
Quote by Ahteh
What I've heard from other people is that it's a bad idea to rush to higher speeds since you'll end up with sloppy play instead of learning to play cleanly. This program however "forces" you to go to a level you can't handle, after which it lets you play at an intermediate level, which - according to the manual - is where most of the gain is.


If your goal is to one day play fast (well)... then you will need to develop these traits along the way:

- Consistent and precise accuracy
- Light-touch fretting
- Advanced finger independence
- Overall relaxation in your playing.

If you're stressing out and straining to keep up with this program... It's not helping anything that I listed.
Put another way... you could develop enough strength and stamina to trill for 5 minutes without a break - but that won't necessarily make you a good player by any means.
There's a lot more to it than brute strength. Just keep in mind , that's all...

I dunno maybe you do that in a fully relaxed and accurate manner, if so that's good ... if not, you are training in tension that you'll have to train out down the road. Do yourself a favor and find the balance right now. good luck
#5
Quote by cringer

If you're stressing out and straining to keep up with this program... It's not helping anything that I listed.



Well, it's not really about me stressing out, it's just the way the program advocates you practice.
#7
I practice like this all the time, not with the specific program you are using, but i will practice a song / part of song in guitar pro, where you slow it down and increase the song up 1, 2, 4 BPM etc every time the section repeats until you are at full speed, then bring it right back down to a super slow speed. I found it really helps with accuracy. Plus you can set the upper limit on how fast you play, especially if you know you cant play the song/section at full speed. It is immensly helpful with solo's, this is how i learned the first solo from the Dream Theater song "Count of Tuscany" and it worked like a charm.
#8
I use this program too, but I adjusted the speed curve so that I'm not playing in the 'broken' part of the curve as much. I start out in 'easy' and go through 'tiring' and then cap out in the first two levels of 'broken' before descending through 'tiring' to level off in the highest level of 'easy'. My goal is to play fast enough to shred, but I'm not in a hurry. This gives me a good enough workout.
#9
I think this is sorta right, but it's missing a huge ingredient that will hurt you.

You have to "program" the movement you're learning into your body BEFORE you can do that cycling of the speeds.

What this means is you need to practice it slowly and accurately for like 5-10 sessions in a row so that it's IN your system. If it is, it will feel natural to do. You don't have to focus super hard anymore.

Once that happens, THEN it's time to push your speed up and down. Because you have to get it to the point where you don't have to focus 100% on making it accurate, so that you can focus on "cleaning" up the movement. THEN you can worry about speed. This is a big mistake I see people make. They worry about speed too soon.

Anyway, I wrote an article on this before. You can read more about this here: http://www.nobsguitar.com/what-is-a-metronome-actually-used-for-when-practicing-guitar-hint-not-speed/