#1
Links, specifications, etc
Specifications of both pianos:
Korg SP-170 specifications: http://www.korg.com/product.aspx?pd=565
Casio CDP-100 specifications: http://www.casio.com/products/archi...echnical_Specs/

Demonstration of both pianos:

Korg SP-170 demonstration : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSp2zYUItCg
Casio CDP-100 demonstration: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZBblFa8Fg4&feature=related

The noisy keys on both pianos:
Casio: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M52qu052XUg
Korg: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1JRyf2D2Iw&feature=related
(Though the Korg seems to be an isolated case, because I haven't seen anybody else complaining about this problem. The Casio's seems to be recurring.)


TL;DR

Korg SP-170 for 550 USD (actual price 800 USD) brand new. Yay or nay?
Korg SP-170 specifications: http://www.korg.com/product.aspx?pd=565


Go for Casio CDP-100 (Cheapest digital piano, around 550 USD too). Yay or nay?
Casio CDP-100 specifications: http://www.casio.com/products/archive/Musical_Instruments/Cabinet_Digital_Pianos/CDP-100/content/Technical_Specs/


Wait for my friend to hook me up with a second-hand digital piano, which may be really good and cheaper than either of the above. Yay or nay?

Do all digital pianos have keys that bounce back up and make a noisy plasticky sound?



So...

I know this has been asked before. I hijacked the previous thread but didn't get any replies, so instead of bumping that, I'm making a new thread. Hope it's okay!

I'm looking to buy a digital piano because lately I've been having this strong motivation to play the piano. Acoustic pianos are out of my budget (unless I get used, which I'm very open to, by the way. But that's not the problem!) and can't fit into my house. Even a digital piano will take up a lot of space in my house, so I'm going to just put it on my table.

I've been researching and reading reviews of many keyboards, and at first I set my eyes on a Casio CDP-100. It seemed to be the cheapest digital piano there is, and while the action on the keyboard is pretty good (save for some problems.) , the speakers don't seem to be the best. I'm willing to live with the speakers quality, but the aforementioned problems involve the keys making a plasticky sound when it bounces back up if I press it and let go suddenly.

The Casio CDP-100 seems to be hit and miss with this, because apparently some have this problem and some don't.

So, I decided to just do more research and see how it goes. Then, I found out that there's a place near where I live (Technically it's relatively far, but my country is really, really, really small, so it's all cool.) that is selling the Korg SP-170 for only about 550 USD, which is a small price increase from the Casio CDP-100. The speaker also seems to be pretty good. From the videos I've watched, the Korg's action also is quite decent.

But here's the problem. Apparently some owners of the Korg are also experiencing the noisy keys problem.

So, here's my question.

1) To anyone who's tried them or something similar, how does the Korg SP-170 and the Casio CDP-100 feel? Do they feel cheap and tacky?

2) Should I just go for the Korg SP-170 instead of waiting for my friend to hook me up with a second-hand digital piano? My budget is really tight, and I'd like to save as much money as possible. 550 USD is actually more than I'm willing to spend, but the cheapo that I am, I'm pretty tempted to get the Korg anyway because it's on a 15% discount at the moment.
Last edited by triface at Apr 12, 2011,
#2
I dunno about actual digital pianos, but i've found that one way to get a GREAT song is to use a computer and a midi keyboard.

the plug-in "Mini Grand" (usually comes with any edition of pro tools) sounds amazing and is widely editable. And since it's in a DAW you can do ANYTHING with it. Reverb, delay, endless effects.

So there's a thought that could get you to a better piano sound on the cheap. Or at least the cheap-ER.
#3
Quote by Altitudinous
I dunno about actual digital pianos, but i've found that one way to get a GREAT song is to use a computer and a midi keyboard.

the plug-in "Mini Grand" (usually comes with any edition of pro tools) sounds amazing and is widely editable. And since it's in a DAW you can do ANYTHING with it. Reverb, delay, endless effects.

So there's a thought that could get you to a better piano sound on the cheap. Or at least the cheap-ER.

Hm. That does sound like a pretty good idea, but I'd really like the gratification of playing like I'm on a real piano. Also, said table is actually in my room, which doesn't have my computer. There's not much room infront of my computer.
#4
Hm. Would really like some advice, guys. Any advice is fine. Currently looking for as much information as possible.

In any case, since the first post is so cluttered, I'll just post some stuff I edited in a few days ago.

The Korg SP 170 is going for the same price as the Casio CDP-100. The Korg SP 170 seems like the logical choice, but I'd like some second opinions first, because I have no idea how the action and sound on both pianos are like.

Also, is MIDI in a feature that would be used a lot? It seems kinda cool to be able to hear songs played on the piano, but in some ways it feels like it's pointless. Am I missing something important?

Last but not least, do all digital pianos have the same problem of noisy keys? Or just some low-end digital pianos? Am I right to say they're not on all digital pianos? Haven't seen much complaining about the Korg having this problem. Maybe it's an isolated problem with the unit?
Last edited by triface at Apr 12, 2011,
#6
Looking for a replication of the acoustic piano. I'd like to learn piano, but there's no space in my house for an acoustic, so I'm settling for a digital. It helps that they're generally cheaper too.
#7
Quote by triface
Looking for a replication of the acoustic piano. I'd like to learn piano, but there's no space in my house for an acoustic, so I'm settling for a digital. It helps that they're generally cheaper too.

Well are you looking for a temporary solution? Or would you rather go with something thats pretty high end.


I can only help with the latter, but if thats what you want, I would take a look at the top of the line acoustic piano makers (such as yamaha) and look at their selection of digital pianos. No one knows the feel and sound of an acoustic piano better then those guys, and their replication of it digitally is generally some of the best stuff you'll find.

There are downsides though, these pianos are much less versatile, because they aren't trying to be much more then a digital replication, but if thats all you want, then that'd be my recommendation


EDIT: here's Yamaha's selection
http://usa.yamaha.com/products/musical-instruments/keyboards/digitalpianos/


The clavinovas are what my University uses in the piano labs, to give some credibility to it. And they are generally pretty damn good
Last edited by nmitchell076 at Apr 13, 2011,
#8
Thanks for the response! Was really excited to see a response. :P

I'm more about looking for a temporary solution, and I'm fine with using it for a long time because I've been using my starter guitar for four years now.

With all due respect, the series that you recommended are out of my budget. However, I will definitely start looking it for Yamahas. I think you made an extremely good point there.
Last edited by triface at Apr 13, 2011,
#9
we just got a used upright piano from our old school that was getting rid of. I'd recommend checking with local music schools and univerisities.
#DTWD
#10
Quote by primusfan
we just got a used upright piano from our old school that was getting rid of. I'd recommend checking with local music schools and univerisities.

Hmm that's actually a good idea too. How would I go about it? Just phone them and ask if they're interested in selling their pianos?
#12
I have a yamaha something or other. Its pretty cool. Its not one like what you want, its one with all the buttons and digital displays and whatnot, but it does a plain piano sound pretty well. I can only imagine that a yamaha dedicated to only making that one sound would do it masterfully, as opposed to making a bunch of sounds pretty well. if that makes any sense.
"I can see that we speak the wrong notes."

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#13
Quote by satanicgurrl
I have a yamaha something or other. Its pretty cool. Its not one like what you want, its one with all the buttons and digital displays and whatnot, but it does a plain piano sound pretty well. I can only imagine that a yamaha dedicated to only making that one sound would do it masterfully, as opposed to making a bunch of sounds pretty well. if that makes any sense.

I get what you're saying!

Actually, I would get a piano with these sounds and emulates the real piano if I could, but there isn't one in my budget, and that's if such a digital piano exists!