#1
Here is a video of Herman Li (couldn't find a better exaple of what I want to be able to do) the run starts at 0:24.
I've always wanted to be able to rip like that but since I'm a big Metallica fan, all my shredding work is similar to Hammett's lots of legato, triads, main fast stuff is played using 1-3 strings hammer on's and pull off's .
Now what wanna do is cut down on that boxed legato shredding and wah wah raping and pick most of the notes.
Should I just practice chromatic and other alternate picking exercises with a metronome or is there something else?
#3
Sup, hummm I recommend you to practice some paul gilbert arpegios and his alternate picking tecnique. I can, actually, do that and you just need to practice and made up your own sextupplets and stuff... And stop wanking the Wha Wha.

PS: NEVER stop using the metronome.
#4
Quote by M. Airez
...And stop wanking the Wha Wha.



One can always use it... Just keep it down a bit. Keep it tasteful, but that's the tricky part. Try look up some Steve Vai or Buckethead for the Wah part, but otherwise... Just practice practice practice...
Quote by Wisthekiller
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#5
Quite frankly, if you want to pick more, pick more. The only way it'll happen is if you do it.
Quote by dudetheman
So what? I wasted like 5 minutes watching DaddyTwoFoot's avatar.


Metalheads are the worst thing that ever happened to metal.
#6
Quote by M. Airez
... And stop wanking the Wha Wha.


Yeh, I think Kirk Hammet is definitely guilty of Wah abuse!

OP if you want to sound less like Kirk, you want to start listening to more guitar players. I'm not saying you only listen to Metallica, but if you sound a lot like him when you solo it could just be because you've learnt a lot of his solos and listened to a lot of Metallica (absolutely nothing wrong with that!).

What it might be a good idea to do is: listen to more Dragonforce (which will allow your brain to absorb the sound), also learn some of the solos to see what's going on in them. What keys/chords/scales does Herman Li use? And How does he phrase notes? These are what you should be asking yourself.

It might also be a good idea to find out who his influences are, and try listening to them too. You really want to get inside someone's head if you're trying to play like them.

Also, your style wont change overnight. You'll just slowly absorb different influences until you end up sounding like "YOU"- not Herman Li, Kirk Hammet, Tony Iommi, Jimmy Page...whoever you've been listening to most!
#8
Quote by chainsawguitar
Yeh, I think Kirk Hammet is definitely guilty of Wah abuse!

OP if you want to sound less like Kirk, you want to start listening to more guitar players. I'm not saying you only listen to Metallica, but if you sound a lot like him when you solo it could just be because you've learnt a lot of his solos and listened to a lot of Metallica (absolutely nothing wrong with that!).

What it might be a good idea to do is: listen to more Dragonforce (which will allow your brain to absorb the sound), also learn some of the solos to see what's going on in them. What keys/chords/scales does Herman Li use? And How does he phrase notes? These are what you should be asking yourself.

It might also be a good idea to find out who his influences are, and try listening to them too. You really want to get inside someone's head if you're trying to play like them.

Also, your style wont change overnight. You'll just slowly absorb different influences until you end up sounding like "YOU"- not Herman Li, Kirk Hammet, Tony Iommi, Jimmy Page...whoever you've been listening to most!

Pretty much this.

For all the shit he gets, Herman is actually a very solid guitarist. He's got decent phrasing skills and he has a good grasp of technique. What you see in his playing is a fair variety of tonal sound (major and minor for sure, though I don't think he ever gets into modes or anything terribly advanced like that), including harmonized scalar runs and rapid alternate picked /tapped runs.

You'll also see the occasional sweep in his solos, though he really doesn't use them as often as he does alternate picking, basic hammer-on/pull-off legato, and strategic use of artificial harmonics. Most of that "dragonforce" sound is in the harmonies, speed, and harmonics.
#9
I really enjoy Herman's playing, he's been flawless both times I've seen him, and I can honestly say that if you want to play solos like he does, then you should learn pretty much everything he does, and he uses many different techniques in his solos. The best advice I'd give you is listen to other players that play with a similar style, check out some of John Petrucci's solos from Train of Thought (his scale runs in This Dying Soul are definitely worth a listen if you want to be able to 'rip'), have a listen to some of Michael Romeo's stuff (Herman has said that he was influenced by him if I can remember correctly, and Herman's use of tapping shows some Romeo influence) anything from Symphony X is good.

If you want to improve your scale runs, I would recommend trying to learn some Dragonforce and some Yngwie Malmsteen, I must admit, nowadays, I can't stand Yngwie's music, but a few years ago when I worshipped him, learning his scale runs really improved my own. I'd recommend trying to learn Yngwie's Trilogy Suite Op. 5 and Far Beyond The Sun, and to really see how Herman brings all the techniques together, give the solo to My Spirit Will Go On a go, he makes use of sweeping, tapping, scale runs and it's one of my favourite Dragonforce solos. I wish you luck, and I hope you've found this useful.
#10
Basically all you need to do is practice the "big 3" of shred:

(1)Alternate picking
(2) sweep picking
(3) tapping (in Herman's case, there was a lot of arpeggio tapping there)

Scale wise, if you want to do that, it was all natural minor.

Overreliance on natural minor is Herman's biggest weakness - although I guess that's understandable since they play power metal, which of course draws most heavily on Maiden.

Nonetheless, I'd like to see Herman try somthing new harmonically. He's clearly mastered the "big 3" techniques of shred, but that little blurb he did there was generic and bland, IMO.

Just look at the tabs on this site for Dragonforce's songs, learn the solos, study the licks. Everything he did there is in some dragonforce solo, if not EVERY dragonforce solo.

Now, I'm not better than Herman Lee, but what he did there seems within the range of most players who have mastered the "big 3", save for speed, which Herman clearly has.

Overall, aspiring to Herman's level of ability is a fairly realistic goal for budding shredders, so studying this guy until you've thoroughly demystified his style would be worthwhile. Good post.
Last edited by Riffman15 at Apr 13, 2011,
#11
Quote by Geldin
What you see in his playing is a fair variety of tonal sound (major and minor for sure, though I don't think he ever gets into modes or anything terribly advanced like that), including harmonized scalar runs and rapid alternate picked /tapped runs.


He uses different modes on the latest, UB. He also has his 'signature' thing of fast alternate picked passages mixed with sweep picking and tapping.
I am not too fussed with his playing but if you listen through you can pick it up.
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.
#12
In fact, if you want to play like herman I could probably get you his major licks.
I know all of Totman's licks and they share a lot of them.
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.
#13
Quote by Solid S/hit
In fact, if you want to play like herman I could probably get you his major licks.
I know all of Totman's licks and they share a lot of them.


If you could post a link to some of Herman's "stock" licks that'd be great. Might make it easier rather than having to extract them from the songs.
#14
It would be better if OP actually *had* to sit down and extract them. That way, he sees how they're used in the context of an actual song rather than a lick on a list. You know, forcing the player to analyze a song and really look at how everything is used isn't necessarily a bad thing.
#15
Quote by Geldin
It would be better if OP actually *had* to sit down and extract them. That way, he sees how they're used in the context of an actual song rather than a lick on a list. You know, forcing the player to analyze a song and really look at how everything is used isn't necessarily a bad thing.


never said it was. I was actually speaking for myself, the OP, and the rest of the board. He offered anyways. . . What can I say, I'm slightly lazy..
Last edited by Riffman15 at Apr 13, 2011,
#16
Thank you very much for the advice guys! And one more question how to get his sound, what effects he uses let's say in My Spirit Will Go On.
Last edited by Laurikaru at Apr 13, 2011,
#17
In My Spirit Will Go On, he uses a wah pedal to give the notes some extra flavour, and he also uses a pitch shifter for some of the insanely high notes he hits, as they cannot be normally hit, I've noticed in tabs, a lot of people tab the pitchshifter as a harmonic. His most common effects are pitch shifters and wah, you'll find them used in most of Dragonforces solos, and in studio, I believe that he uses doubling to get a more full sound, this can be replicated with a good delay pedal, but in the Ultra Beatdown Album, he makes use of a WAG ring, which you won't be able to get hold of, as I'm not sure it's on the market, and it is ridiculously expensive. Herman himself has said that he was only interested in it so that he could show the middle finger to Sam Totman on stage and make his note higher while doing so, so, again, a pitch shifter may be used.
#18
The pitch shifter is only for the ridiculously high runs. For individual notes, I tend to think that it's a harmonic.
#19
Oh, of course, I was just pointing out that in a lot of Dragonforce tabs I've seen, there are harmonics in places that are clearly made by a pitch shifter, and if someone plans to study Herman's technique, the tabs can be a little confusing if they aren't aware of his use of a pitch shifter.