#1
If I'm playing a solo in the Minor scale, would I focus on playing the R, b3, b6, and the b7 since that is what makes up the minor scale or is there somethign else to it?
#3
Quote by Blckspawn
If I'm playing a solo in the Minor scale, would I focus on playing the R, b3, b6, and the b7 since that is what makes up the minor scale


No

Quote by Blckspawn

or is there somethign else to it?


there is lots more to it.

suggestion...

Learn plenty of solos & melodies. Study them.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 12, 2011,
#4
You don't want to just focus on three or four notes in the scale, because those notes will only sound good over certain chords. Remember that melodies should always resolve to a chord tone, and that there will likely be more than one chord in a progression. If you're playing a minor scale over a chord progression, you're going to end up wanting to focus on different notes depending on the chord you're on in the progression. For example, if you're in A minor and you're playing a chord progression that goes between Am, Dm, and Em, you'd probably focus on the notes A, C, E and G when you're on the Am chord, because those are the 1, 3, 5 and 7 of that chord. When the Dm chord rolls around, you'd start focusing on the notes D, F, A and C, because those are the 1, 3, 5 and 7 of a Dm chord. Thus, the notes that you focus on within a scale will shift with the chords you play. Remember, however, that you don't want to just play the 4 notes that fit over each chord, because that will end up sounding stale. You want to utilize all 7 notes, but use the 4 "safe" notes to resolve each line. If you stop on a "bad" note, it's going to sound out of place. If you use your ear, you should have an easy enough time figuring out which notes to stop on and which notes not to stop on as you're playing your solo.
#6
Quote by Blckspawn
If I'm playing a solo in the Minor scale, would I focus on playing the R, b3, b6, and the b7 since that is what makes up the minor scale or is there somethign else to it?


As has been said, it's more complicated than that.

So if you were playing the Minor scale you wouldn't necessarily emphasise those notes, but you would if you were playing the Aeolian mode...(which is where I think you've got that idea from)...

...and if you're confused by the difference then I suggest you forget modes for now...(sorry, I've mentioned them again)...
#7
Quote by Blckspawn
If I'm playing a solo in the Minor scale, would I focus on playing the R, b3, b6, and the b7 since that is what makes up the minor scale or is there somethign else to it?



What are the chords underneath it? If you are going to be over one chord, then the R b4 and 5 and b7 are great destination tones whith the others creating some sort of tension and release functions. In all actuality you could play b3 and b7 and also (7) in the minor key, and add extensions, such as 9 and 11 and some chromatic outside notes judiciously, to create some ideas, especially if the root was being played by someone else, its gives a nice sense of intervallic separation to the music.

Best,

Sean