#1
Hey guys!
Well I've had this guitar for a while and I've never really known much about it. It was my mum's uncle's guitar and he died a few years ago but his things were kind of haphazardly distributed around the family and eventually my grandmother realised I'm the only one that can actually play guitar so she gave it to me.
My family don't know anything about it either. Just that it's pretty old, looks nice and sounds nice.
So I thought you guys are most likely people to know anything about it. I really like this guitar and I'd be interested to learn some of its history.







Sorry about the low quality images. The little logo thing says „Ridi", which makes me think it probably isn't English-made because we don't use „

This guitar is quite small. The other guitar in this picture has a 25.5"/647.7mm scale length.



Thanks a lot!
Last edited by captainsnazz at Apr 12, 2011,
#2
woow ****ing amaizng piece ..... sorry dont know bout the model but i had to comment!!!
Gear:
-Squier Bullet Strat

DUNLOP CRY BABY

-Peavey ValveKing 212
#3
This makes me wonder where my uncle's guitar is :P
You've got yourself a beaut' though, something you can be proud of.
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#4
Interesting, to be sure. Can you tell if it has a solid top or not? I don't think it does. I'd put lighter tension classical strings on it. Old guitars like this one typically need lower tension strings to make sure nothing pulls out of place or breaks. Is the neck straight? It looks like it was made with flamenco-style playing in mind, judging from the aesthetics and high access. I can't help you on the history part, but I'd clean it up with some good non-silicone guitar polish and, if the fretboard seems a little dry, a drop of teak oil on the unfinished fixtures (bridge and fretboard). I would also recommend a readjustment of the tuning machines and possibly cleaning them up.

How does it play?
Sincerely, Chad.
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#6
I don't think it's technically a guitar. More likely, a "requinto" or one of several very similar Latin instruments.
Here's a Google Images page; as you can see there are several on the page that resemble your instrument closely.
Some of these have four strings, some eight, some six... There are several different instruments in this family that resemble each other:
http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&source=hp&biw=1440&bih=741&q=requinto&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=g10&aql=&oq=

Also the Wiki:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requinto
#8
Quote by Chad48309
Interesting, to be sure. Can you tell if it has a solid top or not? I don't think it does. I'd put lighter tension classical strings on it. Old guitars like this one typically need lower tension strings to make sure nothing pulls out of place or breaks. Is the neck straight? It looks like it was made with flamenco-style playing in mind, judging from the aesthetics and high access. I can't help you on the history part, but I'd clean it up with some good non-silicone guitar polish and, if the fretboard seems a little dry, a drop of teak oil on the unfinished fixtures (bridge and fretboard). I would also recommend a readjustment of the tuning machines and possibly cleaning them up.

How does it play?

Well I was originally going to say it seems like a solid piece of wood but a guy in the thread patticake linked to said that "guaranteed not to split" being written on it probably means it's a laminate. Which makes sense.
Yeah I originally tried some thick gauge strings on it because generally I like thick gauges, but the guitar didn't like that so I've got some really quite thin ones on it.
The neck is straight, completely flush with the body.
Thanks for the advice. The tuning machines are pretty stiff and it could do with a clean overall, I've just been a bit worried about somehow wiping the graphics off by accident. They've already faded a bit in some places
It's really really nice to play! The first time I played it I fell in love with it. I'd never really been much of an acoustic guitarist until I got this guitar but it just played so smoothly

Quote by Bikewer
I don't think it's technically a guitar. More likely, a "requinto" or one of several very similar Latin instruments.

I think you could be on to something here. Is there anything I should do differently with it if it is a requinto? I guess I'd just put requinto strings on it and tune it up, but if it isn't then would that damage my guitar?

Thanks to everyone who said my guitar is pretty
Last edited by captainsnazz at Apr 13, 2011,
#9
This is a nylon-string instrument. I don't know if the nylon strings applied to these Latin instruments are any different than normal classical guitar strings, but you could always take the instrument along to the shop and have the guy measure them with a micrometer.

I don't know much about the tunings used on these instruments; having six strings it might just use a standard guitar tuning, but it might be an octave or some other interval higher.
You see these instruments a lot in Mariachi bands; we have a local group that uses them.