#1
I'm not sure whether I'm posting this in the right place...anyway, the other day I was in a bar with a friend (the other guitarist in my band, actually) and for whatever the reason we ended up talking about music, guitars and stuff. And my friend said (and he sounded totally convinced of it) that, in order to make heavy music (heavy not referring to very distorted, or noisy or loud, I don't exactly know how to explain it) you need double-bass pedal for drums and, most importantly, downtuned guitars. I said you can play heavy shit in E Standard, but of course he had his own opinion and would not even consider changing it (he's a bit narrow-minded)

So the question is, what do you think is necessary to make heavy music? Downtuned guitars, maybe certain scales or rhytms...?
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#4
Jethro tull woot woot. It really depends on how he is subjectively (read: arbitrarily) defining heavy.
#5
The first 2 Black Sabbath albums are in E standard, and yep they're the blueprint for heavy as **** music.
#7
Down-tuning helps. Those bone-crushing bowel-liquefying lows is what I look for in heavy music (heavy, not 'evil').
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#8
Quote by Mr Winters
So the question is, what do you think is necessary to make heavy music? Downtuned guitars, maybe certain scales or rhytms...?


Well you can make country music with downtuned guitars and double bass drums if you wish. Does that mean it's automatically heavy? What if you have a downtuned guitar, but played all the chords higher than E so the same song could be played in standard? Is the presence of those 4 extra notes and an extra bass drum REALLY the secret to playing heavy?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Heaviness in music can be several factors, and some people even consider lyrics to be a contributing element. Guess it depends on ones point of viiew.
#11
#12
bRakeDownz r teh bR00ts heaveh!!!

But seriously i think its a combination of things, and it is a subjective thing, one person might see metallica as heavy as ****, another might find justin beiber to be too heavy. The answer is going to be different from person to person. I think Down tuned guitars and double kicks make an awesome contribution to the world of crazy heavy music, but not every piece has to include those to be heavy. To be honest i think that after drop B the 'drep..nesss' stops going up. Drop G isnt heavy. just ugly.
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#14
Quote by Myshadow46_2
Heavyness is mainly in the production IMO.


Agreed. While badass riffs definitely help, the production is what makes that badass riff 100x heavier. Play a riff through a scooped Marshall MG, then play that same riff through a Mesa Dual Rectifier with pretty high mids and sharp presence. It will sound heavy as ****. Heaviness in the entire production is basically the same concept, except instead of just using better amps, it also entails very strategic use of EQ, distortion (not guitar amp distortion), compression, etc.
I play guitar in a funky death metal band called Lobotomizer. Listen to our demo here.
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#16
we'll i actually think that tuning down actually helps. for example breaking benjamin is not a heavy band per se, but when they use Drop A# tunning even these simple riffs sound really heavy.

check out intro to lights out or i will not bow
#17
not that down tuning doesn't help but you can play just as heavy with standard as you can with any down tuning.... I may be wrong, but isn't master of puppets in standard? and I would say that MoP is prety much the definition of heavy metal.....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#18
Quote by krypticguitar87
not that down tuning doesn't help but you can play just as heavy with standard as you can with any down tuning.... I may be wrong, but isn't master of puppets in standard? and I would say that MoP is prety much the definition of heavy metal.....



yeah but do you think that master of puppets is really that heavy?

i know i will get flamed for this but the song all hope is gone by slipknot is way heavier
#19
Quote by Jim #4
yeah but do you think that master of puppets is really that heavy?

i know i will get flamed for this but the song all hope is gone by slipknot is way heavier


It's not the tuning. It's the production.

For example:
In Mourning's song For You to Know is one of the heaviest songs I know. It's in Eb standard. The intro to Opeth's Bleak is in E standard and is absolutely crushing. Between the Buried and Me's White Walls has a tremendous breakdown (2:35 in the video). It's in C# standard. The Human Abstract's Digital Veil is heavy as a mofo and is in Drop C.

What do they all have in common? Production with a strong presence, good use of hard-panned instruments, high mids, and a good helping of gain (not so much to distory the sound, but to fill it out).

Bands with poorer production just don't sound heavy to me. Death metal tends to do nothing for me in that area because the production of so many bands is thin and cutting, not particularly volumous. The same goes for black metal and thrash metal. There isn't much emphasis on the middle range of the instrument, which is where a lot of the power of a guitar's sound comes from.

Good EQ in tandem with good phrasing is what makes a song "heavy".
Last edited by Geldin at Apr 13, 2011,
#21
Quote by Jim #4
yeah but do you think that master of puppets is really that heavy?

i know i will get flamed for this but the song all hope is gone by slipknot is way heavier

its definately heavier than say Rain by breaking benjamin which is in drop C.... sorry but I would consider it pretty heavy. just cuz something is heavier doesn't mean this isn't. seriously if you mix it properly and use the right chords you can be heavy in every tuning, it doesn't have to be deep to be heavy.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.