#1
Ive never used the effects loop on my amp but im getting an mxr 10 band eq pedal soon so i wanted to figure this out.

To shape a distorted tone, it would make sense to put the eq in the effects loop, right? the problem is that i read that the effects loop is strictly for time based effects, and not for any that add gain. Im pretty sure (correct me if im wrong) that eq pedals add gain to some extent.

Also, ive been looking to boost the gain on my amps overdriven channel with a tubescreamer to be able to handle modern metal a little better. It just doesnt make sense to me that a boost goes in front of the overdriven amp, and not after it in the loop

Any info on the effects loop in general would be greatly appreciated
#2
There is no set "rule" about what effects you can or can't run into effects loops. However, when you run an effect in the loop, it will bypass your preamp stage and can have a much more noticeable effect on your tone. It is very useful for effects like chorus or delay where you want the distortion to come before the pedal.

In regards to EQ, you can experiment. Generally, if I like my tone but it needs just a little tweaking, I would use an EQ before the preamp. However, if you want to make major changes to your sound you can add it into your effects loop and go wild. This will allow you to add in extra bass before the sound becomes flubby, modify the normal character of the amp's sound, etc.

As for the boost, a Tubescreamer will go in front of your amp so that it can both tighten up your sound while also allowing you to add more gain to the signal, resulting in a heavier level of distortion. If placed in the loop, it would take your original signal and then just add distortion on top of it in addition to the Tubescreamer's tone. It will usually make your amp sound more thin and fizzy, although you can certainly try it out for yourself.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#3
Quote by Xeron Brigs
There is no set "rule" about what effects you can or can't run into effects loops. However, when you run an effect in the loop, it will bypass your preamp stage and can have a much more noticeable effect on your tone. It is very useful for effects like chorus or delay where you want the distortion to come before the pedal.

In regards to EQ, you can experiment. Generally, if I like my tone but it needs just a little tweaking, I would use an EQ before the preamp. However, if you want to make major changes to your sound you can add it into your effects loop and go wild. This will allow you to add in extra bass before the sound becomes flubby, modify the normal character of the amp's sound, etc.

As for the boost, a Tubescreamer will go in front of your amp so that it can both tighten up your sound while also allowing you to add more gain to the signal, resulting in a heavier level of distortion. If placed in the loop, it would take your original signal and then just add distortion on top of it in addition to the Tubescreamer's tone. It will usually make your amp sound more thin and fizzy, although you can certainly try it out for yourself.



Thanks a lot, that was a huge help. Have you heard of anything regarding damaging the amp using the effects loop the wrong way? i dont want to do something stupid lol
#4
Quote by spitfire915
Thanks a lot, that was a huge help. Have you heard of anything regarding damaging the amp using the effects loop the wrong way? i dont want to do something stupid lol


Really any damage that you might get will probably be due to having too extreme of setting on whatever you put in it. For example, if you put in your 10 band EQ, don't start with all the sliders all the way to max, as that could damage your speakers.

Just use general common sense and you should be fine.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#5
You can't damage your amp by running pedals in the loop. It won't always sound great, but you can't really damage anything.

Running an EQ in the loop will sound a bit different than having it in front. You get a bit more control, because the preamp will compress your signal when you use distortion, which can bring frequencies you've cut back up in level, but in the loop that won't happen.
Last edited by littlephil at Apr 13, 2011,
#6
Yeah, there seems to be a general consensus that it works best in the loop, but just try it.