#1
Hey guys, just after some advice.

I've started teaching someone and they can play like simple melodies, say smoke on the water but on one string, single notes not chords.

When playing these riffs/melodies is it important to teach alternate picking or is that too much for a beginner??, i'm sorry if this is a stupid question but I figured you might want to get someone used to that as soon as they start as lots of riffs become easier that way, as aposed to down picking it all.

This mainly hit my mind due to them requesting to learn a certain song, its not hard, its just 2 2 bar riffs pretty much and I can simplifiy it for a beginner so various techniques are learnt from it. I don't want to say, we can't do this because you've got lots to learn first, as thats quite negative..

Apologies if this is all a bit stupid, I thought I should get some advice so I can do this well.

Advice appreiciated!
Cheers
My gear
ESP Horizon II FR (Seymour's with coil tap)
ESP LTD Ex400
Wesley Explorer/Dominator

Ashdown Fallen Angel 40w DSP

BOSS DS-2 Turbo distortion
BOSS AC-3 Acoustic Simulator
BOSS GE-7 Equalizer
Ibanez Tube Screamer TS9
#2
If they can pick normally with down picking then I say go for it, it's not exactly an advanced technique and it would probably help the player in the long run if they learn it early and don't get used to just down picking all the time.
#3
I would say yeh but thats just my personal opinion. I was never taught alt. picking and as such, after almost 2 years of playing, have only started to learn it and unfortunately i'm struggling greatly haha bad habits die hard i suppose! hope this helps in some way
#4
Definitely!
Alternate Picking is as important as breathing if you want to become a good guitarist!
I’d suggest,as a teacher you should focus on technique at the start.Also,you should sit down and ask your students what they really want to do later with their instruments.That way you’ll know how serious you have to be with them.If they sound more than convincing about their passion,you should show them everything you know!
That’s just my opinion.Rest is upto ofcourse!
Have a good one man!
#6
Quote by theking4everr
Definitely!
Alternate Picking is as important as breathing if you want to become a good guitarist!


This is absolutely correct. The single most important technique I ever learned was alternate picking. You should definitely incorporate this into your teachings. It really isn't all that difficult to learn and once your student finally "gets it" it will come so naturally that they won't have to think about it.

Not to mention that it will make guitar playing much, much easier for them.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#9
alternate picking is very important not to mention essential in the grand scheme of learning guitar.
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#10
Quote by David_VI
Hey guys, just after some advice.

I've started teaching someone and they can play like simple melodies, say smoke on the water but on one string, single notes not chords.

When playing these riffs/melodies is it important to teach alternate picking or is that too much for a beginner??, i'm sorry if this is a stupid question but I figured you might want to get someone used to that as soon as they start as lots of riffs become easier that way, as aposed to down picking it all.

This mainly hit my mind due to them requesting to learn a certain song, its not hard, its just 2 2 bar riffs pretty much and I can simplifiy it for a beginner so various techniques are learnt from it. I don't want to say, we can't do this because you've got lots to learn first, as thats quite negative..

Apologies if this is all a bit stupid, I thought I should get some advice so I can do this well.

Advice appreiciated!
Cheers

I wouldn't start with alternate picking.
At 1st I'd have them down pick everything.

Introduce alternate picking on 8th notes, and after they've had time to get used to the basic downstroke.

Also, It's important not to give the impression that a person should alternate pick everything they play. Sometimes alternate picking is appropriate, sometimes it's not.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 13, 2011,
#11
i think it should come shortly after introducing downpicking. in fact, i'd actually start with strumming full chords properly first, just to get them used to moving the pick in both directions - i don't think the beginner's mindset of playing everything with downpicking is very healthy.
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#12
Yes,

If you start early it's going to be better for them. At the Academy I use Guitar Speed Trainer, as soon as I start to teach single lines stuff. I start out with custom exercises, that I've made, but the first one I always have them do is an open string warm up with just the picking hand to about 8ths starting at 40bpm. GST is very very very very...did I mention very.... indispensable because it will PLAY the exercise with the click so the student hears and can copy it. I think at first they learn by imitation but about 2-3 weeks in they start feeling and understanding the beat, but it makes anything that I teach them with single lines that much more cleaner and linear, because thats one area they start to become more natural at.

Good luck!

Sean

Quote by David_VI
Hey guys, just after some advice.

I've started teaching someone and they can play like simple melodies, say smoke on the water but on one string, single notes not chords.

When playing these riffs/melodies is it important to teach alternate picking or is that too much for a beginner??, i'm sorry if this is a stupid question but I figured you might want to get someone used to that as soon as they start as lots of riffs become easier that way, as aposed to down picking it all.

This mainly hit my mind due to them requesting to learn a certain song, its not hard, its just 2 2 bar riffs pretty much and I can simplifiy it for a beginner so various techniques are learnt from it. I don't want to say, we can't do this because you've got lots to learn first, as thats quite negative..

Apologies if this is all a bit stupid, I thought I should get some advice so I can do this well.

Advice appreiciated!
Cheers
#13
Thanks so much for your replies, i'm going to touch on it and discuss the technique and why its important and give it a go with a basic exercise, but I don't want to suck out the fun of learning guitar as a beginner. I'll see what the reaction is and then work out what to do
My gear
ESP Horizon II FR (Seymour's with coil tap)
ESP LTD Ex400
Wesley Explorer/Dominator

Ashdown Fallen Angel 40w DSP

BOSS DS-2 Turbo distortion
BOSS AC-3 Acoustic Simulator
BOSS GE-7 Equalizer
Ibanez Tube Screamer TS9
#14
I'm going to go ahead and say no (though, when you introduce eighth notes, you'd probably introduce alternate picking), in the very beginning you want to focus on good time, melodic phrasing (best as the student can), and developing a strong tone and right hand control through use of a rest-stop picking technique (i beleive its outlined in the beginning of A Modern method for guitar, though it may be Berklee Basic guitar) . get your student to play stuff where the smallest division of the beat is a quarter note, and once they get off the ground with that introduce eighth notes, the idea of subdividing and alternate picking (generally, get them to rest stop/down pick quarter, half and whole notes, and alternate pick eighth notes--when starting with alternate picking assigning them some work that just uses eighth notes, like the first 3 wolfhart violin studies, or just playing scales--so that they get familiar with the technique).
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#15
^ i look at it like if they're that beginner then their timing isn't as good as it's going to be down the road, might as well have them start alternate picking then and have it progress along with all the other skills they should be practicing.
#16
^ i look at it like if they're that beginner then their timing isn't as good as it's going to be down the road, might as well have them start alternate picking then and have it progress along with all the other skills they should be practicing.


I can see where your coming from, and I'm sure that that approach works--but I tend to see good time as one of the most important things one can develop, and if all you give them is easy stuff for a while, but their playing it with a strong sound (from rest-stroking), solid sense of phrasing and good time (and as far as technique goes, good control with their right hand, and a left hand posture that won't lead to injury) then when you progress and give them harder stuff and start to really work on technique, they will keep those habits, wheras if you start with alternate picking (which less face it, is really hard when your starting out) on top of that, you run the risk of them focusing on that (cause when you start playing, a lot of the time you just want to play fast and melt faces) to the detrement of other stuff.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#17
^ i actually found alternate picking hard after i had been playing awhile. i guess i had been jamming for a year or 2 before it was pointed out that "you can hit it going up" and i tried for forever before it started becoming natural. to me, just personally looking back on how i learned i think that had i started alternate picking with down picking, they would've gotten better together. it's one of those "this is what i think would've helped me better in retrospect" things, both have valid merits as a good sense of rhythm is definitely important.
Last edited by z4twenny at Apr 18, 2011,
#18
yes yes yes

my guitar tuitor told me to alt pick and made me alt pick. at the same time another person was learning but had started much earlier than me. i have no trouble alt picking but he does.

start the proper technique from the beginning