#1
Hey all.
So my first theory lesson in a while from my guitar teacher was about lead tones.
We only used it to jazz up a blues progression and I did pretty good only a bit rubish with bringing them back to the actual scale.
But how would I use these in a rock fashion.
And I don't know anything about fusion but do they use alot of lead tones.
EDIT:I freely translated it from Dutch so I don't know if the name is right. With lead tones I mean playing a lot of chromatic notes.
Last edited by liampje at Apr 13, 2011,
#2
Quote by liampje
Hey all.
So my first theory lesson in a while from my guitar teacher was about lead tones.
We only used it to jazz up a blues progression and I did pretty good only a bit rubish with bringing them back to the actual scale.
But how would I use these in a rock fashion.


Put on some distortion and play with a rock attitude.

No difference in theory.
shred is gaudy music
#3
A 'leidtoon' is in most situations the note one semitone under the tonic, in practice this means it's *almost* always the seventh degree of a major or harmonic minor (B in C major and G# in A harmonic minor, for example).

In a more jazz setting, a leading tone can be used to approach chord tones by step. Just apply this to the riff/chords being played underneath the solo/lead. Keep your intended audience in mind though, if they want to hear a standard rock song, they most of the time won't appreciate a more 'jazzy' (god, I hate that word) approach to leads. If your intended audience would be more open to that, go right ahead.
#4
Quote by Keth
A 'leidtoon' is in most situations the note one semitone under the tonic, in practice this means it's *almost* always the seventh degree of a major or harmonic minor (B in C major and G# in A harmonic minor, for example).

In a more jazz setting, a leading tone can be used to approach chord tones by step. Just apply this to the riff/chords being played underneath the solo/lead. Keep your intended audience in mind though, if they want to hear a standard rock song, they most of the time won't appreciate a more 'jazzy' (god, I hate that word) approach to leads. If your intended audience would be more open to that, go right ahead.

So leading tone in jazz is playing towards chord tones in a chromatic fashion?
And in non jazz situations it would be just the seventh degree of a scale right?
#6
I think there's a little bit of confusion here, just in terminology. I don't know if what you're talking about is the leading tone or just passing tones. In either case, it really doesn't matter what genre you're in to use these as they're both used in the same way almost universally. Passing tones are merely out of chord tones that connect two chord tones and the leading tone is merely the seventh scale degree that leads to the tonic in cases of dominant function chords.
#7
Quote by liampje
So leading tone in jazz is playing towards chord tones in a chromatic fashion?
And in non jazz situations it would be just the seventh degree of a scale right?



NO,

a leading tone is a leading tone. being in a "jazz situation" doesn't change the concept.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 13, 2011,
#8
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
I think there's a little bit of confusion here, just in terminology. I don't know if what you're talking about is the leading tone or just passing tones. In either case, it really doesn't matter what genre you're in to use these as they're both used in the same way almost universally. Passing tones are merely out of chord tones that connect two chord tones and the leading tone is merely the seventh scale degree that leads to the tonic in cases of dominant function chords.

I litterarily transleted it so I think their name should be passing tones.
Is playing passing tones chromatic?
#10
Quote by Zen Skin
Passing tones need not be chromatic.

If I am playing G to C major and play the notes G then A then C, the A is a passing tone.

So how are those chromatic lines called in english that jazz players use alot.
#11
Quote by Zen Skin
Passing tones need not be chromatic.

If I am playing G to C major and play the notes G then A then C, the A is a passing tone.


Passing tones are typically stepwise though, so the A isn't really passing.

As for what chromatic lines would be called in English, they're called chromatic lines.
#12
Have a discussion with your teacher about it next time you see him
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do