#2
miss-matching is bad m'kay.

There are whats called "safe" miss matches but I would avoid them.
I forget whats safe since I won't do a hookup unless its matched, period.
But I think you have a safe mismatch listed there.

BUT I COULD BE WRONG.
#3
yeah on my spidervalve i havent used it forever, and im pretty sure the tubes have gone microphonic but im not too sure if it was because i might have accidently had the speakers in the 4 ohm space instead of the 8 ohm, but its been so long i cant remember, i just wanted to know what might have happened if that was true
#4
Quote by effyeahjade
yeah on my spidervalve i havent used it forever, and im pretty sure the tubes have gone microphonic but im not too sure if it was because i might have accidently had the speakers in the 4 ohm space instead of the 8 ohm, but its been so long i cant remember, i just wanted to know what might have happened if that was true

in that case you were fine.

other way around would be bad. 8ohm cab with 16 ohm out from the head would be bad.
etc...
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#5
Quote by gregs1020
in that case you were fine.

other way around would be bad. 8ohm cab with 16 ohm out from the head would be bad.
etc...

What Greg said is correct. CodeMonk is also correct in saying - 'always match'. That is easier to remember than anything.

Here is the skinney though:

For Tube amps:
Amp Head Ohms > Cab Ohms = Possible blown Power Valves and/or Output Transformer.
Amp Head Ohms < Cab Ohms = Strain on the Output Transformer, Power loss.
*Some amps can take a 1 step mismatch but not all.

For Solid State Amps:
Amp Head Ohms > Cab Ohms = Broken amp
Amp Head Ohms < Cab Ohms = Power change, no strain
#6
Ohm's law is what would happen. Power = Voltage ^2 / Resistance. Your voltage is constant because that is the output voltage of the amplifier. If you lower resistance, you have more power being delivered to the speaker.
#7
Pretty much everything said above. Easiest way to remember for me is that if you are going to mismatch (like if your amp doesn't have an out that matches the cab), then ALWAYS mismatch so the head has the smaller number... so like the 4 ohm jack on the head driving an 8 ohm cab, etc.

Your manual should mention cab impedance and mismatching. If done correctly, a mismatch is ok, but the best option is to match whenever possible.
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