#1
I've been playing around with composition for a while now, but I'm finally actually trying to finish a full song. My problem is this: I wrote the chords and small riffs for a single guitar (see my profile if you'd like to hear) and I need to add more to it. Everytime I try to add something to it, I end up hating it, getting pissed, and breaking something (I have anger management issues). NOTE: I know the theory and everything that's neccesary for writing it.

Is it normal to have such a difficult time coming up with the music for a second instrument?

Also, I currently don't have a band, so I'd be playing this alone. Should I just say "screw it" and just do the one part? And if I get a band going, have them come up with their own parts?

This has got me SUPER frustrated...

Thanks everyone.
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."
#2
well by second instrument you could add a bass line. Just stay in the same key and find a nice rythm. For second guitar you meen more of melodies ? well maybe just let your fingers run on your guitar and wait for the inspiration.
#4
Quote by BrandonBeaux
What's wrong with only one guitar part? Sometimes less is more


I don't have a problem with a single guitar, but in this specific case, I feel like there needs to be more too it.
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."
#5
When I really have no idea, sometimes I'll move the melody up an octave and call it a solo. Add some bends and it might even fool a casual listener. i.e. Twisted Sister's "We're Not Gonna Take It." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xmckWVPRaI
"There's a fine line between child abuse and discipline. Take my dad for example; when I screwed up, my dad would electrocute me. And look at me today: flawless. Electrocution builds character." - Maddox
#7
I've listen to your untitled song...

I think you could add a lead guitar track easily...

Just make sure to have a nice tone, maybe on neck pick up? Would fit in my opinion...

Take your time improvise slowly and repeat the song as many time as necessary... You'll find some pattern you like some you doesn't like and some that you'll to edit... If this is what you want to add as a second instrument for sure.

For the bass line just make it follow your root note and main chord then add variation wherever you can.

For the drum if you're not used to i suggest you write your song on a midi file then add the drum on the midi... Much more easier and after that you can just take your drum on a drum machine and get a good mix with it...

Except that i don't know? I liked your song... Maybe try searching as many genre and new band you can... This alway help being more creative.

Search band with lead guitarist...

Hope that help!



-MDP
Last edited by MangeuDePoutine at Apr 13, 2011,
#8
A clean electric or slightly distorted lead guitar that basically improvised around the rhythm would be nice. Then add some light, basic drums (they can be done with a drum machine if you don't have a drummer) and a light bass that repeats and supports the rhythm. I think your song has great potential, whatever you do with it, though.


#9
You could use the schillinger system, in that system of composition, it is the rhythm of the lines that matter, rather then harmonic content (which was secondary), as such, a good counterline is easily attained by taking the "retrograde" of the rhythm of the primary melodic line. That is, reverse the rhythm (as though you were playing it on a record player and played it in reverse). TO schillinger, "retrogrades" provide the best rhythmic counterpoint.

Now, I don't know if you want to try this, but it might be interesting to experiment with in places. So, take the rhythm of your entire melodic line (lets say a quarternote, an eighth, and a dotted quarter; which is a measure, but yours would be the reverse of the entire rhythm), and reverse it (a dotted quarter, an eighth, and a quarter).

Then put this second rhythm as a rhythmic track, and play all the parts together, then you might get ideas about the melodic content of the second line (or just impose one on that newly generated rhythmic figure).

Might not produce the results you want, but at least its an option that you can try with almost any song.