#1
Hello, I'm a new drummer here. I've been playing for about 3 weeks as a replacement drummer in a steel drum band, which I also played the steel drums in until our (3rd.) drummer quit.
How did you guys learn to keep the individual drum pieces in time without them being affected by different timings of other pieces? Like the intro to Walk This Way. I'm fine when playing a high hat quicker than the bass, but I can't articulate to play the high hat 4/4 and the bass in triplets.
#3
Get a metronome and set it very slow. Play it as slow as you can plat it conformably. Eventually your muscle memory will start to kick in and you will be able to play it a little quicker each time.

But I suck at drumming and I’m a little buzzed.
#4
When you use a metronome, a good thing to do can be to count the notes in between.

So for every metronome beat you go 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a for 16th notes, it will help you feel where every note falls.

So this is how I would count the Walk This Way Intro (the song is 110bpm I think, but if your having trouble with the speed take it down to around 70bpm or even slower, then gradually speed it up)

[size="3"]. . | 1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
.|OH|-x-------------------------------|
4|HH|---------x---x---x---x---x---x---|
4|SD|---------O---------------O-------|
.|BD|-O-------------O-O---O-----------|[/SIZE]
Spiraling Up Through the Crack in the Sky...

...Leaving Material World Behind...


SOUNDCLOUD

GT - Elite Curbstomp
#5
Just us ea metronome and practice it reaaaaaaally slow, basically. That's the only way to develop a drumming basic like that. Eventually it'll become natural. Also, just try playing the basic rock groove over and over, and then maybe start adding strokes on the bass drum and stuff. Something useful for that is to practice combinations of two limbs separately, so like right hand to right foot, right foot to left hand, etc...