#1
so ive got a new tutor purposely to gain the knowledge of multiple genres. we're doing blues at the moment. my tutor says you can use the relative major over the 1 chord of the progression the only thing that has confused the heck out of me is that he says the relative major is C# (we are playing in E) i would of thought the relative major was G. my tutor says to play the same scale (shape) 3 frets down (9th) and thats the relative major. maybe he has got confused and is seeing the E blues scale as a major and thinking of the C# as the relative minor? im now mega confused

many thanks.
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#3
Quote by dopelope
Sounds like you need a new tutor, or your guitars are tuned differently. Em pentatonic= G major Play the G major over it and you will see, it fits. Am pentatonic= C major . Try it with blues backing tracks on youtube. Enjoy!


that what i thought it was
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#4
he might have got it wrong, but he might be talking about the major pentatonic scale, with added #3, in which case c# would be the normal blues scale. try playing the major pentatonic on E, then the minor pentatonic on C#
#5
He sounds like a terrible teacher. What he means is you can play the major scale over the first chord (which is major anyway) So in E, play E major which has the same scale shapes as C#m (E's relative minor). But it isn't a good idea to see it as C#m. So you can play E major pentatonic over chord one and E minor over 4 and or 5.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDx5sbOzrhg This guy is a good teacher.

EDIT: Woops that link was his example
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sg2liihQU-8&feature=related
This is him explaining what you're asking about.
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Last edited by Venice King at Apr 14, 2011,
#6
Quote by shredda2084
so ive got a new tutor purposely to gain the knowledge of multiple genres. we're doing blues at the moment. my tutor says you can use the relative major over the 1 chord of the progression the only thing that has confused the heck out of me is that he says the relative major is C# (we are playing in E) i would of thought the relative major was G. my tutor says to play the same scale (shape) 3 frets down (9th) and thats the relative major. maybe he has got confused and is seeing the E blues scale as a major and thinking of the C# as the relative minor? im now mega confused

many thanks.


Are you sure he's not saying Relative Minor of E Major is C#? Because if he does, he's right.

The same scale that I'm thinking of stared at the 9th fret, is and will work and have the function as a scale that is E Pentatonic Major/C# Pent Minor depending upon the key and chords and tonal center..

Best,

Sean
#7
Quote by Venice King
He sounds like a terrible teacher. What he means is you can play the major scale over the first chord (which is major anyway) So in E, play E major which has the same scale shapes as C#m (E's relative minor). But it isn't a good idea to see it as C#m. So you can play E major pentatonic over chord one and E minor over 4 and or 5.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDx5sbOzrhg This guy is a good teacher.

EDIT: Woops that link was his example
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sg2liihQU-8&feature=related
This is him explaining what you're asking about.


thanks you.

the thing that still confuses me is about E major pent having the same scale shape as C#m. the notes are the same, so does that mean i can use the C#m scale (E relative minor) over the one chord?

thanks.
better shred than dead
#9
Quote by shredda2084
so ive got a new tutor purposely to gain the knowledge of multiple genres. we're doing blues at the moment. my tutor says you can use the relative major over the 1 chord of the progression the only thing that has confused the heck out of me is that he says the relative major is C# (we are playing in E) i would of thought the relative major was G. my tutor says to play the same scale (shape) 3 frets down (9th) and thats the relative major. maybe he has got confused and is seeing the E blues scale as a major and thinking of the C# as the relative minor? im now mega confused

many thanks.

What he probably was telling you is that C# is the relative minor to E Major. By using the C#minor pentatonic shape you are actually playing the E Major pentatonic scale.
It allows you to get both the Major and minor sounds using the same shape.

to put it in context:

You're jamming an E blues.... you know the minor pentatonic shape. Play it at the 12th fret and you get E minor pentatonic, Play it at the 9th fret and you get E Major pentatonic.
It's very common for blues players to mix and match those 2 sounds.

^ I assume that's what you're teacher is trying to get across.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 17, 2011,