#1
I have been researching how to play guitar for a week now like a crazy ocd s.o.b. and I wanted to ask some questions that Idk, and clear some things up.

Currently, I have an Ibanez Gio guitar. My friend, who is a guitar god, says mine is a good beginner guitar. Ofc i also know that many companies do make guitars just for beginners. But, what makes a guitar for beginners, and what are the differences?

I read somewhere that the shape of the guitar reflects the way it sounds, however I would sort of suspect this with an acoustic guitar, but saw no indication on what they were referring to, so does this apply to electric as well?

Really, whats the difference in guitars between.. say a Gibson Les Paul, and a Fender Stratocaster? aside from the looks ofc. How do you tell these differences?

---Im prolly asking a lot, But I believe that if I really want to get good at guitar, then I should understand them completely down to what type of wood theyre made out of. If anyone has some other information to help me understand these beautiful instruments from the gods of Rock, please post them here. Thanks guys. and rock on.
#3
The cheaper "beginner" guitars are cheaper due to lower quality components, outsourced construction, and generally lax QC levels. This does not make them bad. I have 3 of them despite playing for 6 years now, since they can play very well with the right modifications.

The differences in tone between a Fender Stratocaster and a Gibson Les Paul has to do with the pickups used (single vs. double coils) the wood used in the construction (alder/ash vs. mahogany etc.) and the way the guitar is put together (bolt on neck vs. one piece guitar).

The differences are the a Strat sounds bright, and jangly, but has limited sustain. A LP sounds much darker and bassier, and sustains much better.
#4
the biggest differences are between the shaping of the necks and fretboards and the way they sound. Very small differences in the contour of the neck make the guitar feel much different when you play it. The other big one, is the tonality of a guitar, and this comes from a few different components (the wood that it's made out of and pickups being the most important). A guitar with active pickups (very high output, require a battery) and single coils (think fender stratocaster, with very low output) will sound different.

keep in mind, the most important thing about a guitar is how it feels in your hands, if it plays nice, you shouldn't fret (get it?) about the tone, since is can be altered by effects and amplification as well.
#5
Quote by quinn_1888
*looks at avatar, sig, join date, deduces he joined to ask this question"

Well, I actually joined for many reasons. As for the sig and avatar... just lazy.
#6
Quote by hawk5211
The cheaper "beginner" guitars are cheaper due to lower quality components, outsourced construction, and generally lax QC levels. This does not make them bad. I have 3 of them despite playing for 6 years now, since they can play very well with the right modifications.

yeah he's right
my first guitar was a fender starcaster
and i've completely modified it
and now it's my fvorite guitar
Whenever the Will to Power, in no matter what form, begins to decline, a physiological retrogression, decadence always supervenes.
-Friedrich Nietzsche
#7
Quote by hawk5211
The differences are the a Strat sounds bright, and jangly, but has limited sustain. A LP sounds much darker and bassier, and sustains much better.

When you say sustain, the first thing I think of are the strings "lifespan" is this what your referring to or am I wrong?
#8
Quote by tortilla
yeah he's right
my first guitar was a fender starcaster
and i've completely modified it
and now it's my fvorite guitar


How do you modify a guitar? I have a hard time imaging anything you could to it to make it better in any regard.
#9
Quote by Iblis92
When you say sustain, the first thing I think of are the strings "lifespan" is this what your referring to or am I wrong?

the amount of time a note sounds out after you pluck the string

there are plenty of things you can do to mod a guitar (it's actually not too hard to make one yourself from scratch). Something really simple like swapping the pickups can make a big difference in the way a guitar sounds, or with bolt-on necks you can easily replace the entire neck, which obviously can make a huge difference in how it feels to play that guitar. You can also change out the bridge and nut on a guitar, to modify the sustain (expensive, dense materials will greatly improve the sustain, but can be costly, so they aren't used in a lot of beginner models)
Last edited by kurtebirdi at Apr 14, 2011,
#10
Quote by Iblis92
How do you modify a guitar? I have a hard time imaging anything you could to it to make it better in any regard.

Better pickups, tuners, setting it up, new trem block, better trem system, there are tons of things you can do to a guitar.
#11
Quote by kurtebirdi
the amount of time a note sounds out after you pluck the string

Oh, I think I may know what ur talkin about. Today, a friend told me to show him what I know on guitar so far. He has a jackson guitar (never heard of it) its black and its headstock has all six strings on one side. it was kind of heavy as well. But, when I played it I noticed I could barely hear it, and the strings didnt vibrate for very long. (we were playing ampless, we were just outside havin a smoke)
#12
Quote by Twistedrock
Better pickups, tuners, setting it up, new trem block, better trem system, there are tons of things you can do to a guitar.

A trem system? like a tremolo bar? I remember that my friend had this thing on the base of his strings (dont know actual term, sorry) and it was sort of raised, when u pressed down on it and acted like a whammy (tremolo) bar. He had another guitar that had this....little pad on it that glowed. idk wtf it was tho.
#13
Quote by Twistedrock
Better pickups, tuners, setting it up, new trem block, better trem system, there are tons of things you can do to a guitar.

yup, lots of things u cand do to make a nice guitar.