#1
hi guys i know that in a majeur key the chords are majeur minor minor majeur majeur minor dimminshed can i ask what is a dimminshed chord ?
ah yeah and i have another question neoclassical is what ?? a song ?
Last edited by mado-elodie at Apr 15, 2011,
#2
The diminished chord from the harmonized major scale is created by stacking two minor 3rd intervals; so the triad is made of 1, b3, b5. It is actually half diminished because if you add the diatonic 7th it will be a b7, whereas a whole diminshed chord has a bb7.

The help you see the difference between the triads you get from the harmonized major scale here are the intervals:

Major: 1, 3, 5
Minor: 1, b3, 5
Diminished: 1, b3, b5
#3
A diminished chord is just a minor chord with a flattened fifth (move the fifth one fret lower) to my understanding, so while a minor chord has the formula Root, Minor 3rd, Fifth; a diminished chord would have the formula Root, Minor 3rd Flattened fifth.

Neoclassical is kinda a style, things like Malmsteen I guess would be considered Neoclassical. I think its bassically taking the prinicples of somewriting from the classical era and genre of music and using them on guitar. THeres lots of pedal licks and stuff like that...not really sure though, not really my thing :P
#5
Quote by Powersurge213
Neoclassical is kinda a style, things like Malmsteen I guess would be considered Neoclassical. I think its bassically taking the prinicples of somewriting from the classical era and genre of music and using them on guitar. THeres lots of pedal licks and stuff like that...not really sure though, not really my thing :P

Not really, I mean, thats a very specific type of Neoclassicism, but I wouldn't consider it the main aspect of neoclassicism.

Neoclassicism is derived from two words, Neo (new) and Classical (an older, usually idolized style). Thus the term refers to the revival of a certain type of style called "classical." This definition has been altered over time, for example, one could consider the Renaissance to be a "neoclassical" period since it involved a revival of "classical greek" ideas in art, philosophy, etc.

In music, the neoclassical style must be approached with a knowledge of the context in which it is used, because it could mean a variety of different things. As Powersurge mentioned, it could involve trying to incorporate "classical" (aka, western art music from all periods of time) aesthetic qualities into more "pop" genres.

On the other hand, it should be noted that the entire field of music history is one in a state of flux between a Romantic mindset and a Classical one. The classical mindset is one that places more emphasis upon form, absolute music, precision, etc. whereas the romantic mindset is more.... well... romantic. Thus, the Baroque period was Romantic, followed by the "Classical" period (which was obviously classical), followed by the "romantic period" of the 19th and early 20th centuries, followed by a classical period around the time of the great depression, and a neoromantic shift in the 50s and particularly the 60s. As for where we are now, that is up to the historians some 30 or 40 years down the line to decide.


With this in mind, one can say that "Neoclassicism" as music which shifts from being romantic and expressionistic to music that is more abstract and precision-based. Thus, you can see a clear contrast between Stravisnky's Rite of Spring (a romantic work) and his "Symphony in C" (a highly "classical" piece).

In reality, the term is very vague and could mean pretty much whatever you wanted it to mean.
#6
Quote by Powersurge213

Neoclassical is kinda a style, things like Malmsteen I guess would be considered Neoclassical. I think its bassically taking the prinicples of somewriting from the classical era and genre of music and using them on guitar. THeres lots of pedal licks and stuff like that...not really sure though, not really my thing :P


Neoclassicalism evolved partially from composers fed up with Romanticism, so they used forms, genres and styles from before the Romantic period which were much cleaner, and less dramatic(Classical). This was during the early 1900s to I think the 1950s.
#8
plz don't write a lot of things if u're not sure >< i hate reading and i want a good answare that's all thank u guys
#9
Quote by mado-elodie
plz don't write a lot of things if u're not sure >< i hate reading and i want a good answare that's all thank u guys

Its not that I'm unsure, its that I'm 100% sure that there is no definitive meaning for the word. The wall of text was to help you understand why it could be used in so many different ways, rather then just saying "oh, it can mean a song that sounds like Mozart is playing the guitar, or it could mean someone from the early 19th century, or it could mean someone from the renaisance, or from the great depression, or it could also mean someone who plays alot of classic rock, or it could mean someone..." etc. without explaining why at all. Its better to explain one underlying principal that explains alot of things, then simply spout of random examples that may or may not be what you mean by the term.
Last edited by nmitchell076 at Apr 15, 2011,