#1
I want to be able to draw. Not cartoons but actual photo realistic drawings of people and whatever else might take my fancy.

So to anyone who can draw well; is it a "you've got it or you don't" thing? If not how would i got about learning, because right now i'm terrible.
#2
Practice makes perfect.
████████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
█████████████████████████
██████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
#3
Quote by spitonastranger
is it a "you've got it or you don't" thing? If not how would i got about learning, because right now i'm terrible.

It is. If you've got it, you would learn really fast, and if you dont, you might be learning for years.
#4
Practice. Draw pictures from magazines. Start by lightly sketching in lines to mark where all the facial features should be. I personally always have trouble getting the proportions right.
#5
For most it's just buying like say, "how to draw" kind of book, so that you get the core techniques.

It's very much like learning guitar, the finesse of what you do improves over time, and it's about getting the core technical abilities down.

As for, "have it or you dont", it's just like guitar. Everyone can get to a good level within a decent length of time, but then there are those are just simply better at it than others.
You Dont Know Me

I have 10 Anarchy Points - I also have 8 Mythology points!

Peavey Generation EXP Custom White
Yamaha 120S Black
Korg AX5G
Digitech Whammy
Zvex Fuzz Factory
Boss OS2

Quote by mrfinkle213
This man has brains.

Quote by CoreysMonster
Banned for indirect reference.
#6
Quote by Anthony1991

As for, "have it or you dont", it's just like guitar. Everyone can get to a good level within a decent length of time, but then there are those are just simply better at it than others.


Well that's encouraging.

Anyone know of any 'how to draw books' they could recommend?
#7
it's not a "you're born with it or not" thing, it's a "do you have the dedication and drive to practice drawing for years and years striving to achieve higher levels of skill and possibly never being truly content with your skills because there will always be someone better than you or not" kind of thing.

Seriously, drawing photorealistically is pretty much the hardest thing you can do with drawing. If you're serious about drawing, then go ahead and keep that as your long-term goal, but start smaller. Start with basic things, do still life drawings, basic shapes, learn about shading and light, learn about transferring basic objects from real life onto paper. Drawing people is extremely difficult because the human eye is trained to notice even the slightest differences between faces, and even something as miniscule as making the nose a millimeter too long will make it look odd.

So bottom line, start with the basics, and be prepared for a lot of practice.
#8
Get some (E-)books. Youtube might help as well, same as internet sites. Also get some good materials, they're important.
Quote by PsiGuy60
Banned because f*ck you Hebriqui.
I'd been going for a month or so.


Quote by Peres.T.Peanut
oh **** you
#9
◙▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬
      ◂◂  ►  ▐ ▌  ◼  ▸▸


Haters gonna hate
#10
Quote by _me_

Quote by buckethead_jr
^And known for that bloody awesome croissant with a crown.
Man that's badass.


MINE SIG R PINK
#11
I've heard quite a lot that you shouldn't really think that you're now drawing a face/bird etc, but rather focus on the different lines and shapes and see how they relate to each other to create the thing you're drawing.
There are many sites on internet that can help you get started.
#12
Train your eye too look at what you're drawing in 2D. For example, two cars might be identical in real size, but in 2D the one farther away will be smaller. Learn about perspective on a large scale and then move smaller and smaller from there.
Gear
Highway One Tele (w/Custom Shop 51 Nocaster pickups)
Standard Tele (modded to Nashville specs)
Reverend Roundhouse

Orange Rockerverb 50 MKI
Vox AC4c1
Jet City JCA20H

And pedals!



"Shiva opens her arms now..
...to make sure I don't get too far"
#13
Quote by barden1069
Train your eye too look at what you're drawing in 2D. For example, two cars might be identical in real size, but in 2D the one farther away will be smaller. Learn about perspective on a large scale and then move smaller and smaller from there.

Easy way to do that is look at things with one eye closed. It eliminates depth perception.
Hi, I'm Peter
#14
If you are copying a printed out image, divide each sides length by 4 (or higher if its a large image) and then use this to draw a grid over it. Then draw a grid onto the paper on which you will draw the image using the same method. This allows you to focus on specific areas of the image at a time and allows to resize any image to the correct proportions.
#15
It just takes practice. If you're still in high school taking art classes if they offer them would really help. I know when I first starting drawing people my high school art teacher helped me a lot and gave me the confidence that I could do it.

Portraits are my absolute favorite thing in the world to draw but they are one of the most challenging. I suggest you start by practicing drawing different parts of the face to begin with, such as the nose, mouth and especially the eyes. Once you get the basic parts of the face and the human head start putting them all together and you will eventually get it. It can take a bit of time to catch on when you are first starting but you will eventually get the hang of it.
Quote by Carmel
Lucky I'm a girl and I don't give a damn.

Quote by darkwolf291

I've seen her kill a man with a spork and a rubber band
No one is safe from the wrath of Batgirl!
#16
It's not really a "Purely talent" kinda thing.
It's just practice, but I recommend getting a teacher, or at least advice from someone with experience regarding your technique.

Also the most important thing about drawing (IMO) is the shading, you've got to learn to observe how the light hits the objects you're drawing.

Don't start with anything too hard like faces or scenery, start off with a cup, or a fork or something that doesn't look like a frustrating job.

Good luck
#19
One of my first good lessons at art school was to draw a small ball as realistically as possible, without simply drawing the silhouette. You had to do four drawings of the ball using different styles of mark making. One you could use fine cross hatching, or scribbles, or circles or something to build up accurate shading. Try that out.

Another really great lesson is gesture drawing. Get a large piece of paper like newsprint and some charcoal, choose a subject, and try to capture it in 15 seconds. Do ten or twenty of these.

If you can find some drop in life drawing classes they can be good, and cheap. I used to go to some at the animation school for like 8 bucks when I was learning to draw.

There are also tons of good drawing lessons on the internet. Its really like anything, with enough practice, anyone can do anything.
#21
I highly recommend getting an art class, it's helped me so much. Plus, I've learned a lot about art in general, gained a much higher appreciation for visual art instead of just aural art (ie music) and on top of it all, it's really fun too.

You can definitely learn to draw without any born skill, it's just that there are some gifted people out there who will be very good artists as soon as they start because they have a natural talent; just like music!

#22
I can't really tell you in what order to do this because I'm a self-taught artist and I did these things in a really messed up order but here are some things that helped me:

-go outside and draw different things from observation
-if you know a person will be standing in one place for a while then try to draw them
-look at other people's artwork and try to mimic their techniques (deviantart is a good website to look)
-read some books on what sort of drawing style you would like to do
-some artists on deviant art have tutorials on how to draw certain things so use the search bar
-if there is an art store close by then go there and the sales people are usually very helpful in learning some different techniques on different art supplies


There is this one art book that I have that has always helped me, I recommend you take a look:



Hope that helped
^^ Hahah, I'm just kidding.. or am I?


Don't click this.