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#2
No. The only one that's actually a decent example of a modal progression would be the phrygian one, because it's essentially functionless. All of the rest could be explained fairly easily as being in C major.

EDIT: Also, the mixolydian one could be reasonably considered modal, especially if it didn't have that second G in it.
Last edited by jazz_rock_feel at Apr 15, 2011,
#3
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
No. The only one that's actually a decent example of a modal progression would be the phrygian one, because it's essentially functionless. All of the rest could be explained fairly easily as being in C major.

EDIT: Also, the mixolydian one could be reasonably considered modal, especially if it didn't have that second G in it.


Cheers, I was thinking of using the mixolydian one anyway.
#4
If you hang around for a bit there will probably be a pack of ravenous forumers who will argue with what I've said and tell you that modal progressions don't exist. And half of them might know what they're talking about.
#5
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
If you hang around for a bit there will probably be a pack of ravenous forumers who will argue with what I've said and tell you that modal progressions don't exist. And half of them might know what they're talking about.


THEY DON'T EXIST.

i mean they kinda do.

looking at the examples, they're all terrible. phrygian does come the closest, though, so i'm agreeing with jrf here. i mean, ionian comes closest, too, but that's because functionally, it's the equivalent of the major scale (not a major key, don't confuse that).

modal progressions can exist, but you really won't get very far. you can't invoke the feel of a relative major or minor key, and you can't use accidentals (maybe sparingly, but you run the risk of invoking the feel of the PARALLEL major or minor key, AND you ruin the characteristics of the mode, so you're best off not using them at all).
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Dammit, I swear I almost said a ravenous pack of wolves, how prophetic would that have been? But yeah, most of the examples are simply awful, but I still say that if the mixolydian one didn't have that second Gmaj chord, it could be modal, because it moves in down in fourths and up in thirds.
#7
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Dammit, I swear I almost said a ravenous pack of wolves, how prophetic would that have been?


legendary.

the sad thing is it took me 5 seconds to understand it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
You can have chords that suggest modality, but its pretty specific, and theres not much freedom. basically theres a concept called Dominant Equivilants--wherein there are certain triads in each mode that keep the modlity when combined with the triad built off the root note or a pedal point, while not pulling to the relative major scale of the mode--the way to figure this out is that the dominant equivilant (so called because they can be thought of being analogous to a dominant chord in a tonal situation, in that they pull to the root) is any triad contained diatonically within the mode that is not a diminished triad (which would pull to the relative major scale) AND contains the charecteristic note (natural 6th in dorian, natural 4 in ionian, b2 in phrygian, b7 in mixolydian, #4 in lydian, b5 in locrian and b6 in aeolian) of the mode.
in C Ionian, the dominant equivilants are D minor and F Major.
in D Dorian, the dominant equivilants are E minor and G major.
in E Phrygian, they are F Major and D minor
in F lydian, they are G Major and E minor
etc.

its important to note that if you add extensions, or even sevenths, you ruin the entire concept.
when you think of extensions with modes, your ususually thinking of them as chord/scales (basically spelling a fully extended 13 chord in steps instead of thirds), or your considering the notes of the triads in relation to the root note of the mode, instead of in relation to the root of the triad (for example, an E minor triad in D dorian could be thought of as the 9, 11 and 13 of the D pedal tone).

edit: that video doesn't seem terribly off, but hes not really playing modally, just tonally with accidentals (not like theres anything wrong with that). then again, mixing modality with tonality (as in, following a modal section and smoothely transitioning to a tonal cadence--for example using a Dm, Em and G major vamp over a D pedal, and after a bit, sitting on the E chord, changing the B to a Bb and resolving to F major--if you have a good grasp on tonal theory and a lot of patience, checking out some debussy or ravel would probably help illustrate this concept).
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Apr 15, 2011,
#10
I surprisingly have nothing to add to this discussion. You guys got it.
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#11
Cap - They way I see these, they are basicially harmonizations of a Pedal Tone or Drone. I understand exactly what you are getting at. I wouldn't call them progressions per se, but I agree with your assessment fully.

But this ALSO illustrated why we cant teach people this stuff, you have to know your stuff, its way too involved (and limited) and you cant fake knowing your theory, to SEE this and how it works. This is the line of demarcation, between forum poseurs that act like modes are scales with power chords or worse yet, fail to see they are only playing in Major and Minor.... and people that know their stuff.

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by jayx124
usually "modal progressions" have pretty much a static harmony (limited amount of chords)
if you want to check out modal tunes you can check out "So What" by miles davis, "impressions" by john coltrain and even the A part of "Take 5"


Or something something something that I can't think of by Mendelssohn

Hungarian folk songs and Slavonic dances were used by Dvorak to intentionally break diatonic "rules".

Obviously a lot of flirtings with sitar and other Indian classical music by western artists is "modal" in nature ... I'm thinking of the Beatles and the song Within You and Without You as well as John McGlaughlin's band Shakti.

SO there are DEFINATELY modal musings in contemporary (i.e. non Renaissance or Ecclesastical) musical forms.

But 98.3% of the time ... nay ... 99.6% ... a guitarist mentions modes, he is talking out of his rectum.

Here's a proposed forum rule: Unless you are Miles Davis or have played with Miles Davis you do not get to mention modes on UG, EVER!
#14
E Aeolian:


E          A         B      E

*  7       9  8      7 5    *
           7  6        3
           3
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Apr 16, 2011,
#15
Quote by griffRG7321
E Aeolian:


E A B E

* 7 9 8 7 5 *
7 6 3
3

erm... wots that? confuzzled like hecticly i am
#16
Figured bass, it shows the intervals above the bass note, it's easier to write suspensions and all that jazz.

So that progression would be Em Em7 Am9 F#o/A Bm7 Bm Em.
#17
Quote by griffRG7321
Figured bass, it shows the intervals above the bass note, it's easier to write suspensions and all that jazz.

So that progression would be Em Em7 Am9 F#o/A Bm7 Bm Em.


Oh i see, lol... I thought it was a top secret anagram for nasa or something. Found an old Gambale tutorial that relates to the way i think of modes and their progs... his was way more interesting though... even though he used the same I-IV-V progs i did...

Basically he says the modal progs can be figured out by writing out your chord/mode chord you aiming at... going up in thirds till you hit 11 (as this kind of chord is rarely used in modes)... and from that, you can make up a few chords within that framework of 6 notes to play modally... very interesting.

But that is what i got out of it. Apart from the standard vamp construction of modal root note followed by the IV and V triad of the respective key the mode comes from.
Last edited by evolucian at Apr 16, 2011,
#18
Link? I've seen his 'modes-no more mystery' DVD and it's great for learning how to make modal vamps and progressions, and they all sound 80s as hell
#20
Hi, I wrote that page. Here's the way I (and other musicians who refer to "modal chord progressions") see it...

Modal chord progressions are simply progressions that imply or enhance a particular modal flavour.

I think it's absurd to say they don't exist. If you use the progression Dm / F / G7, yes you are essentially still in the relative key of C major, but does that really give us an accurate sense of tonality? No. Not at all. The progression resolves around Dm therefore Dorian is the predominant modal flavour and therefore calling it a Dorian progression helps to signify that. You could call Dm a modal tonic of Dorian if it helps you understand the relationship of Dorian to that particular progression.

You could also think of it as just playing C major/Ionian. But there's nothing C major/Ionian about the progression Dm / F / G7. There isn't even a sense of pending resolution to C major. Therefore I think it's more helpful to think in terms of the natural resolution of the progression - i.e. the "modal tonic".

I actually reread a lot of my lessons and feel I might come across as being a little too dogmatic at times, but it's only food for thought. The video has had many positive comments in that it has helped people understand modal relationships and modal tonality, not just in terms of lead harmony, but also how to support modal tonality in your chord progressions.
Last edited by mikebeatham at Apr 21, 2011,
#21
Quote by griffRG7321
Link? I've seen his 'modes-no more mystery' DVD and it's great for learning how to make modal vamps and progressions, and they all sound 80s as hell

His outfit in the dvd still haunts my dreams.
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#22
Quote by mikebeatham
Hi, I wrote that page. Here's the way I (and other musicians who refer to "modal chord progressions") see it...

Modal chord progressions are simply progressions that imply or enhance a particular modal flavour.

I think it's absurd to say they don't exist. If you use the progression Dm / F / G7, yes you are essentially still in the relative key of C major, but does that really give us an accurate sense of tonality? No. Not at all. The progression resolves around Dm therefore Dorian is the predominant modal flavour and therefore calling it a Dorian progression helps to signify that. You could call Dm a modal tonic of Dorian if it helps you understand the relationship of Dorian to that particular progression.

You could also think of it as just playing C major/Ionian. But there's nothing C major/Ionian about the progression Dm / F / G7. There isn't even a sense of pending resolution to C major. Therefore I think it's more helpful to think in terms of the natural resolution of the progression - i.e. the "modal tonic".

I actually reread a lot of my lessons and feel I might come across as being a little too dogmatic at times, but it's only food for thought. The video has had many positive comments in that it has helped people understand modal relationships and modal tonality, not just in terms of lead harmony, but also how to support modal tonality in your chord progressions.


First let me tell you what my instinct is, to say here:

"Are you kidding me?

I WANTED to agree with what you said, because you claim to have wroite the article and I would love to be positive and optimistic that you know what youre presuming to explain. But my friend, in all respect, I want to tell you, that you have no idea what you're talking about, or saying. Dm7 F and G7 definitely have a sense of pending resolution to C major. Definitely."


So this, above ^^^^ is my "knee jerk" response. I don't want to do that. Instead, I would have you play over that example, and tonally make it D Dorian. Post up and educate us here, and we'll have a listen.

It never hurts to give an outside chance to learn something in the process, and so that's what I'm opting to do here.

Post your improv in this, and show me how you tonally stay clearly in Dm.

Because here's my take:

It doesn't. The tritone of the G7 pulls via perfect resolution ie cadence to C. It just does. Now if you go back to Dm you're doing a basic Deceptive Cadence, nothing more. Further more since D minor functionally is an implied F6, it's a V-IV move.

I'll just have you post up the idea of what you are saying, and see what you manage to do, and defer to that. I look forward to your example.

Best,

Sean
#23
And I thought I was dogmatic.

Dm / F / G7 / Dm / F / G7 ... etc.

No resolution to C major, therefore how is saying it's in C major useful to anyone wanting to truly understand modal tonality?

You can call it a "deceptive cadence" or a diatonic function of C major, and it's certainly important to help students understand these functions, but as soon as D minor becomes the tonal center of the progression, I hear Dorian as its functional mode. G7 is no longer the natural V chord, since it is not being played in the context of a C major tonic.

If I have no idea what I'm talking about, why have I received a number of emails thanking me for helping people previously confused by modal theory to finally understand it in a way they can actually VISUALISE it? Why were they confused in the first place? Perhaps because of all the long winded, over-complicating gobbledygook out there that passes for tuition.

I will post an example when I get time.
Last edited by mikebeatham at Apr 21, 2011,
#26
Quote by mikebeatham
And I thought I was dogmatic.

Dm / F / G7 / Dm / F / G7 ... etc.

No resolution to C major, therefore how is saying it's in C major useful to anyone wanting to truly understand modal tonality?

You can call it a "deceptive cadence" or a diatonic function of C major, and it's certainly important to help students understand these functions, but as soon as D minor becomes the tonal center of the progression, I hear Dorian as its functional mode. G7 is no longer the natural V chord, since it is not being played in the context of a C major tonic.

If I have no idea what I'm talking about, why have I received a number of emails thanking me for helping people previously confused by modal theory to finally understand it in a way they can actually VISUALISE it? Why were they confused in the first place? Perhaps because of all the long winded, over-complicating gobbledygook out there that passes for tuition.

I will post an example when I get time.


I look forward to an example. As for your assertion that you have some idea of what you are talking about being buoyed by thank you emails, I could call it a case of blind leading the blind, but, I'll defer to your playing example, because nothing else means anything. If you play it, and it's there, then it speaks for itself.

There's nothing difficult about modes, but they are commonly mis-stated, and misapplied. If you want to call it modal, then know what you are talking about. If you want to call it using modal patterns to function as accidentals where the overall key is major/minor and not modal, well, you'll have no difficulty there, or challenge from me.

Your Dm7 F to G7 will never feel resolved. Play a C note, not even a chord, and you'll see how the whole song wants to resolve on C. Even if you DONT resolve it on C, and you deny it's resolution you cannot change it's tonality. Play it or not, it will still be in C. You don't need to play in C for it to be tonally pulling strongly to C. Now you may not like that, but play a C note, and you'll hear what I mean. You'll have a C major. If you think I'm wrong, then play a C note, don't even play a C chord, and then try to resolve it to D....tonally.

It will never happen...try it. Hey if nothing else, you seem well meaning, and maybe you'll have learned something...or....you'll pull it off, and good thing I listened to it, because I'll have learned something. I'm not too proud to admit if I'm wrong. I'm not going to pull out my email's and accolades to counter yours, I'll just admit that you pulled it off, and that will be that.

Best,

Sean
#27
Quote by TDKshorty


Yep, Phrygian.

Its very repetitive and cannot go anywhere else, without losing its modality. He's pretty much stuck right there. Hey I could grab a Phrygian, double octaves and Play b2 b3 and b6 and make a melody too. It's pretty gutsy for them, but this is an example of a hypnotic, song that doesnt go far.

Sean
#28
Quote by mikebeatham
And I thought I was dogmatic.

Dm / F / G7 / Dm / F / G7 ... etc.

No resolution to C major, therefore how is saying it's in C major useful to anyone wanting to truly understand modal tonality?

...



But G7 pulls to the C major. It isn't necessarily modal -- I guess a lot depends on the voicings


If, instead if G7, you were to play Csus4/G .. that sound more "modal" to me.

I'm thinking of the "So What" chord down a whole step:

10 10 10 10 10 x

Then Esus4/F

x 8 9 9 10 x

and

3 x 5 5 6 3 as Csus4/G

??

I dunno -- something like tat seems more Dorian to my ear.

But -- I'm just playing around.

Cheers!
#29
Quote by Sean0913
Your Dm7 F to G7 will never feel resolved. Play a C note, not even a chord, and you'll see how the whole song wants to resolve on C. Even if you DONT resolve it on C, and you deny it's resolution you cannot change it's tonality. Play it or not, it will still be in C. You don't need to play in C for it to be tonally pulling strongly to C. Now you may not like that, but play a C note, and you'll hear what I mean. You'll have a C major. If you think I'm wrong, then play a C note, don't even play a C chord, and then try to resolve it to D....tonally.


Who says a C note has to be anything more than a passing tone in such a progression?

Even if it does tonally "pull" to C, it's just not helpful to call it C major in this context, even if you're aware of C major as the parent scale. This is why, I feel, students get confused, because although they may eventually understand the relationship of C major to Dm - Fmaj7 and G7, there is no solid C major tonality within the progression until C major is played! It may be a suggested (although I'd propose only to the trained ear), but not confirmed resolution until it is used as such.

Even if it does not sound fully resolved to D minor, C major is not present in the progression, therefore my ear listens for the closest point of resolution in the context of the progression being played, which (to me) is Dm in this example.

So you can mention C major till the cows come home, but it isn't part of that progression, therefore, at the very least after a number of times round, it will no longer be a deceptive cadence but a natural one, and one which (in modal terms) is unmistakably Dorian!

I would like to hear your thoughts on the link I posted earlier, and yes I will post an example as soon as I can.

If my lessons were a case of blind leading the blind, then they wouldn't get very far with it before they hit a brick wall, would they? The comments I've received suggest otherwise. You can't learn this stuff parrot fashion as you know.
Last edited by mikebeatham at Apr 22, 2011,
#30
Quote by mikebeatham
Incidentally, the same Dorian progression (transposed to F#m) is referred to in the this article analysing the Beatles song A Taste of Honey.

The same basic progression (transposed to Am so Am C D) is used in the song Six Blade Knife and it is absolutely without doubt firmly rooted in Am.

This is exactly the same progression mikebeatham posted.

One way of interpreting the Six Blade Knife progression might be as being in Am with a borrowed major fourth, (or natural sixth to make the IV chord major) but you can express the same meaning with one word, Dorian. (Particularly when the ♭6 doesn't feature until a change of tonal centre in the bridge.)

i ♭III IV is a nice little three chord trick suggestive of a Dorian flavour.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Apr 22, 2011,
#31
Quote by mikebeatham
Who says a C note has to be anything more than a passing tone in such a progression?

Even if it does tonally "pull" to C, it's just not helpful to call it C major in this context, even if you're aware of C major as the parent scale. This is why, I feel, students get confused, because although they may eventually understand the relationship of C major to Dm - Fmaj7 and G7, there is no solid C major tonality within the progression until C major is played! It may be a suggested (although I'd propose only to the trained ear), but not confirmed resolution until it is used as such.

Even if it does not sound fully resolved to D minor, C major is not present in the progression, therefore my ear listens for the closest point of resolution in the context of the progression being played, which (to me) is Dm in this example.

So you can mention C major till the cows come home, but it isn't part of that progression, therefore, at the very least after a number of times round, it will no longer be a deceptive cadence but a natural one, and one which (in modal terms) is unmistakably Dorian!

I would like to hear your thoughts on the link I posted earlier, and yes I will post an example as soon as I can.

If my lessons were a case of blind leading the blind, then they wouldn't get very far with it before they hit a brick wall, would they? The comments I've received suggest otherwise. You can't learn this stuff parrot fashion as you know.


Well I think you've made my point. It does resolve tonally to C. What you call it I would suggest is a matter of how you use it. The issue that I suppose I'd bring up or stress, is that while you may have the skill to dodge the note and maintain tonality, assuming I come to your side of the equation here, what does that have to do with how others are likely to play/conclude, and never realize the power of the C note. Without understanding the nuance, and unless you are dead clear to them about navigating around the C, they are going to be dead set that they are playing modally. This perpetuates, and doesn't solve the problem of modes being misunderstood.

Much as in your argument "Only to the trained" ear could one recognize a C Major Tonality, I'd say only the trained ear could adeptly navigate this progression without invoking C Major.

You also admitted that it doesn't resolve to the D minor, you are correct, it's a vamp, that when played intelligently, can avoid the C major pull.

I don't have dispute in the link you posted of the explanation, and I am happy that none of your students are hitting a wall. I'd only be concerned if they were being given this progression and told play D Dorian over this and it will work, because that's not the full story. You'd have to be pretty astute and sophisticated to invoke that, and as you especially pointed out, know what to do or not to do with the C. In these examples written on your website, I didn't see that distinction made.

It does sound like you understand what I was getting at, and I hope that your students and those who are getting this knowledge passed on from you are aware of the same picture.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Apr 22, 2011,
#32
Consider the progression: Dm, F, Am, Dm; Dm, C, Dm, Dm. Dm, F, G7, Dm; Dm, C, Dm, Dm.

It sounds resolved on the D minor, not the C major, nor the A minor.

If you play a melody over it using the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, and G it does not sound like the tune is in a major key; it sounds much more like a minor. Yet I don't think it's A minor - it doesn't sound resolved on an A note, but a D has an apt sense of resolution.

It sounds somehow folk-like, somehow different from the songs we're most used to.

I can describe it in terms of major or minor scales. I would have to consider whether it's in C major, A minor, or possibly D minor. If I choose C, I could say that it's a peculiar little tune that it does not resolve to the tonic of the key. If I choose D minor I have to explain why the IVm chord is major. If I choose A minor I would have to explain why it doesn't sound resolved on A minor.

Or I could choose to describe it as being in the D Dorian mode. If someone knew what that meant, they would know the tune resolves to D (minor), and consists of the notes D, E, F, G, A, B, and C. If they'd heard other music in that mode they'd have some idea what to expect in terms of sound and mood.

So the question of whether it's a modal progression or not is nothing to do with the music. The music exists in its own right, whatever you call it. The question reduces to "which framework gives the better descriptive analysis, major/minor scales or modes?"

To my mind, trying to shoehorn everything into major and minor tonality is wrong. Thinking that everything that doesn't end with a V-I cadence is unresolved is wrong. Resolution is relative, adaptive and contextual.

Because I'm not completely brainwashed by the major scale I don't hear this supposed tension pulling the music to a major tonic all the time. I don't have to skilfully negotiate and avoid possible major scale-like cadences buried within the harmonics of every chord in case it destroys the sense of modality.
Last edited by Jehannum at Apr 22, 2011,
#34
Quote by Jehannum


...
So the question of whether it's a modal progression or not is nothing to do with the music. The music exists in its own right, whatever you call it. The question reduces to "which framework gives the better descriptive analysis, major/minor scales or modes?"

To my mind, trying to shoehorn everything into major and minor tonality is wrong. Thinking that everything that doesn't end with a V-I cadence is unresolved is wrong. Resolution is relative, adaptive and contextual.
...




I think you are hitting an important point here.


I have seen new guitar players learn "scales and modes" and they start talking about modes a lot and they are misusing the term. That is the problem for the developing guitarist. Yes, you are correct -- there are modes, they have function, not everything relies on a perfect cadence as you point out.


But for the new guitar player who is trying to learn some theory, they hit that odd hurdle where they start seeing everything as modal and they are not *really* learning anything new but going back over familiar fretboard patterns.

It's usually a trap for the new guitar player or a guitar player trying to learn music theory -- and it is a real problem -- as Pat Martino has said, most of the vocabulary for music was developed by and for piano players. As a guitar player I tend to see the geometry of the neck when I a lead sheet. But then I hit a wall -- if I don't learn standard notation and more advanced theory I may get stuck treading over familiar guitar idioms and not get a broader sense of music. I believe this is why young players are immediately attracted to speed -- it is obvious to them that guitar requires dexterity. But again the trap is that they will learn no harmony/melody/rhythm/arrangement/articulation/composition and just shred through a dozen or so scales and sound exactly the same as every other mechanical guitar player.

So when I see a post on a guitar forum about modes it is safe to assume the question isn't about modes ... because it is too often true.

My $0.02

Of course we have not gotten to the more interesting discussion of how to play "So What" on guitar ... maybe next time.

#35
You need to make use of the charectaristics of the particular mode.
Such as lydian has a flat 5, play that b5 chord.
Dorian has a raised sixth,play that min#6 chord.
If you are thinking more into how the other chords work in combination with the chord your mode is, for example: phrygian has a half step interval to a major chord.
You can make use by playing that phrygian chord and then the major chord.
Also starting on the chord from which mode you're wishing to play is a good idea, and don't make it too long, else you will have a mode switch in the middle of the progression, you don't want that.
Highlighting the chord will also be good, play when youre in F lydian a Fmaj7 and the rest plain triads.
#36
Quote by liampje
You need to make use of the charectaristics of the particular mode.
Such as lydian has a flat 5, play that b5 chord.
Dorian has a raised sixth,play that min#6 chord.
If you are thinking more into how the other chords work in combination with the chord your mode is, for example: phrygian has a half step interval to a major chord.
You can make use by playing that phrygian chord and then the major chord.
Also starting on the chord from which mode you're wishing to play is a good idea, and don't make it too long, else you will have a mode switch in the middle of the progression, you don't want that.
Highlighting the chord will also be good, play when youre in F lydian a Fmaj7 and the rest plain triads.



No Modes for YOU!

Get back to Major and Minor and learn standard notation!!!!

Everyone knows it is FMaj7#11 for Lydian ...


But seriously --- you are still learning basics ... forget modes. You are just going to get confused.

Stop thinking about them and learn your 4 basic scales ... Major, Natural, harmonic and melodic minor ... learn how to play chord tones, scale tones and chromatic embellishments ... learn songs. Forget modes.

There are no modes.

It was a prank ... Greeks are having a laugh .. there were never any modes ... go back to the other 99% of Western music and forget this thread.
#37
Quote by griffRG7321
G7 is already in the key of D minor.
wha??? howd you get to that conclusion bro? B♭ in Dm not B I just rolled out of bed after four hours sleep what am I missing.

Quote by Jehannum
So the question of whether it's a modal progression or not is nothing to do with the music. The music exists in its own right, whatever you call it. The question reduces to "which framework gives the better descriptive analysis, major/minor scales or modes?"

To my mind, trying to shoehorn everything into major and minor tonality is wrong. Thinking that everything that doesn't end with a V-I cadence is unresolved is wrong. Resolution is relative, adaptive and contextual.
This is the most intelligent and reasonable thing I've seen posted on modes in a long time. - kudos
Si
#38
Quote by 20Tigers
wha??? howd you get to that conclusion bro? B♭ in Dm not B I just rolled out of bed after four hours sleep what am I missing.



D Melodic minor ma brutha
#39
Quote by liampje
You need to make use of the charectaristics of the particular mode.
Such as lydian has a flat 5, play that b5 chord.
Dorian has a raised sixth,play that min#6 chord.
If you are thinking more into how the other chords work in combination with the chord your mode is, for example: phrygian has a half step interval to a major chord.
You can make use by playing that phrygian chord and then the major chord.
Also starting on the chord from which mode you're wishing to play is a good idea, and don't make it too long, else you will have a mode switch in the middle of the progression, you don't want that.
Highlighting the chord will also be good, play when youre in F lydian a Fmaj7 and the rest plain triads.


A --- l i t t l e --- k n o w l e d g e --- i s --- a --- d a n g e r o u s --- t h i n g

Sean
#40
Quote by griffRG7321
D Melodic minor ma brutha
Aaah *click*.

I didn't see it because I don't tend to use the melodic minor scale as a harmonic device I just never went there. I only use it as an ascending melodic approach to the tonic. I don't even think of it really like a full scale to be harmonized but as a kind of occasional adjustment to the natural minor. I'm not disagreeing with your conclusion just explaining how I missed it.
Si
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