#1
Hey guys, I really find my practice time inefficient and unproductive, can anyone direct me to a good method/habit of practicing? I'm really not sure what to do anymore. Do I just practice chords and scales all day?

I'm thinking of practicing chords (and they're different inversions), scales, some theory on the side, and sight reading. I'm really not sure what else to practice.
Quote from TGM "We're all musicians, we should protect our ears like we protect our dicks."
#2
My advise is dont go all out theory all the time ofc its great to do theory but mix it up with learning songs i like to do it this way 1 hour learning a random song i like. 30 mins on scales and chords. and 30 mins learning new strum patterns and picking styles .also before i do anything each day i fuk about for 30 mins to loosen my fingers playing any old shit.as for the paper theory and practice if u can get away with it read at work makes time fly .but i mix it up each day nothing is regimented to much but i do like to use this as my 2 to 3 hour a day practice routine etc.dunno if it helps hope so oh also i wanted to add what i thought would not be a bad idear is incoperate the songs u have learnt into your theory learning eg pulling the song apart understanding its make up and writing the song out etc fun way to learn to site read i guess.
Last edited by Rosewood55 at Apr 15, 2011,
#3
or do as i do and practice off Youtube lessons of songs you like =)

can't say that it'll teach you "proper" techniques, but it certainly is more easier and fun to do.
#4
Quote by Rosewood55
My advise is dont go all out theory all the time ofc its great to do theory but mix it up with learning songs i like to do it this way 1 hour learning a random song i like. 30 mins on scales and chords. and 30 mins learning new strum patterns and picking styles .also before i do anything each day i fuk about for 30 mins to loosen my fingers playing any old shit.as for the paper theory and practice if u can get away with it read at work makes time fly .but i mix it up each day nothing is regimented to much but i do like to use this as my 2 to 3 hour a day practice routine etc.dunno if it helps hope so oh also i wanted to add what i thought would not be a bad idear is incoperate the songs u have learnt into your theory learning eg pulling the song apart understanding its make up and writing the song out etc fun way to learn to site read i guess.


Oh Thanks That's a pretty long practice routine! Thanks though, this is sorta what I'm looking for!

Quote by gduck
or do as i do and practice off Youtube lessons of songs you like =)

can't say that it'll teach you "proper" techniques, but it certainly is more easier and fun to do.


:S I've been doing this since forever! It can only do so much unfortunately ;( I'm trying to break the barrier and take it to the next level you know?
Quote from TGM "We're all musicians, we should protect our ears like we protect our dicks."
#6
One of my favorite things to do is just keep Ultimate Guitar open while playing music on shuffle. When a new song comes up, I pause, find a tab, then read the tab while I listen. It helps a lot with applying music theory, because you're constantly focusing on how they actually created the sound you're listening to. If you happen to find a song that you think you could handle or a riff you're itching to try out in the process, go for it!

This is how I learned most of my songwriting and playing skills. I've taken a few college courses, which really are helpful, but this is the most practical way I've found to learn more.
#7
Quote by JaguarAG
One of my favorite things to do is just keep Ultimate Guitar open while playing music on shuffle. When a new song comes up, I pause, find a tab, then read the tab while I listen. It helps a lot with applying music theory, because you're constantly focusing on how they actually created the sound you're listening to. If you happen to find a song that you think you could handle or a riff you're itching to try out in the process, go for it!

This is how I learned most of my songwriting and playing skills. I've taken a few college courses, which really are helpful, but this is the most practical way I've found to learn more.


Oh thanks ! I don't exactly do what you do haha, but when I hear a song I like I always check the tabs... unfortunately... most of my music is Japanese :S... so I think I'll have a hard time finding the tabs hehe. I usually tab them out myself! ;D
Quote from TGM "We're all musicians, we should protect our ears like we protect our dicks."
#8
Yeah, that does make it harder to find tabs. Tabbing them out for yourself is another really good way to learn, though. Good luck!
#9
Quote by JaguarAG
Yeah, that does make it harder to find tabs. Tabbing them out for
yourself is another really good way to learn, though. Good luck!


Thank you !
Quote from TGM "We're all musicians, we should protect our ears like we protect our dicks."
#10
learning and transcribing will help you the most. Learn a song in and out, then learn the theory behind it. Then experiment. It's important to have association with a technique or theory. Just having a lot of information with no practical use of it is pointless.

--m
www.knobtwiddler.net
#11
Quote by knobtwiddler
learning and transcribing will help you the most. Learn a song in and out, then learn the theory behind it. Then experiment. It's important to have association with a technique or theory. Just having a lot of information with no practical use of it is pointless.

--m
www.knobtwiddler.net


That's very true! Thanks!
Quote from TGM "We're all musicians, we should protect our ears like we protect our dicks."
#12
One thing I recommend, which goes along with knobtwiddler's suggestion, is to ALWAYS learn something in the context of actual music. Especially music you like. Learning chords just for the sake of learning them, is ridiculously slow, tedious, and useless. If you learn it in the context of a song, it will be 1. easy to remember 2. a lesson on how to use it 3. faster
#13
Quote by no bs johnny
One thing I recommend, which goes along with knobtwiddler's suggestion, is to ALWAYS learn something in the context of actual music. Especially music you like. Learning chords just for the sake of learning them, is ridiculously slow, tedious, and useless. If you learn it in the context of a song, it will be 1. easy to remember 2. a lesson on how to use it 3. faster


That makes sense hehe. Learn what you use :P. Actually now that I think of it, when I learn chords just to learn chords it doesn't really stick... especially when it isn't associated with a song.
Quote from TGM "We're all musicians, we should protect our ears like we protect our dicks."
#14
Actually, now that you mention it, this brings up a good point...

It sickens me that I see companies selling so-called "Guitar learning" books and DVDs with HUNDREDS of chords and techniques, ALL out of context (or in the context of music nobody listens to), and all shoved together in a ginormous package when the reality is that

1. it would take most people YEARS to complete a course like that
2. learning stuff out of context hardly ever works and is super slow (and boring)

Unfortunately, most people aren't aware of those 2 points. They think they're getting a lot of "value" because the course is huge. But they would be MUCH better off learning a few things at a time WELL (like a song), instead of getting info overload. Songs contain plenty of lessons, but won't overload you. You can actually focus and master it.