#1
Hey everyone. I'm new here to Ulitmate Guitar. And I'm a learning musician. So I really don't have a full grasp on music-related concepts.

I've been a U2 fan since I first listened to The Joshua Tree. And I've been to at least five U2 concerts over the years.

At these concerts, I've discovered that every time U2 performs live, their songs sound very different from the original recordings.

One U2 fan told me that U2 regularly "re-arranges" their songs in order to fit a live setting.

What does it mean when an artist "re-arranges" an original recording? In what different ways could an artist "re-arrange" an original recording?

How do you guys go about "re-arranging" your songs? What certain elements and nuances of a song would you guys "re-arrange"?

Can any of you expert musicians here explain this to me?
#2
Cut out, shorten or lengthen an intro. Rearrange the order of a song by deleting a chorus, or possibly by repeating a chorus. The possibilities are endless.
#3
Well with U2, there's way too many parts being played in the recorded songs for them to reproduce live with just the 4 of them. "arranging" a song is working out what instruments play what and all the harmonies and layers and everything like that, so for them to re-arrange a song for live, it works out what is to be in the backing track, and what parts are most important for the band to actually be playing while leaving everything else out. it could also be adding new parts and changing the feel of the song and almost "remixing" it in a way. an example of that is when they did the more clubish version of "...Go Crazy Tonight" on the 360 tour.

they also re-arrange the song in a structural sense. where they'd repeat or leave out choruses or verses or sing other verses/songs mixed in with a different one. there's an infinite amount of things that can be done to a song, and a live setting is often where it's done.
#4
When I was with my old band, I would layer the guitar and add samples and synth to our songs when we were in the studio. We didn't have a keyboardist or a DJ performing live with us, so the songs lost that element onstage. Since I wrote the synth parts, I sometimes played them on guitar live, adding them at random during the song. Or sometimes, I would come up with some new guitar part on the spot.
A callous exterior isn't an uncommon way of protecting ideals; it hides the idealists from the derision of fools and cowards. But it also immobilizes them, so that, in trying to preserve their ideals, they risk losing them.
#5
rewrite parts--basically, as long as the melody is recognizable you can do whatever you want (intros, endings, extra choruses, different instrumentation, reharmonization, changing key, adding modulations, taking a melody and then writing a substantial origional composition based on it etc). with U2 i'd imagine it involves using a less-rediculous amount of effects and guitar overdubs. basically, when re-arranging a song an artist can do whatever the **** he or she wants--this goes both for U2 going from the studio to stage and for you hearing a song on the radio and thinking "wouldnt it be cool if....".
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Apr 15, 2011,
#6
Keep in mind that some people never play the same song the same way twice -- jazz musicians are famous for that.

Hendrix was famous for never quite playing the same song the same way.

Because people get tired of playing exactly the same thing over and over they will make little alterations. In his day Bach was known for improvising over a basic theme -- even improvising complicated pieces like fugues. Other keyboard greats have done this over the centuries, Handel, Liszt, Chopin, Mozart, Beethoven, Dave Brubeck, Thelonius Monk, Bill Evans, Stevie Wonder etc were (or are) known as very good improvisers.

Some pieces of music and some styles allow for more improvisation than others. In the classical tradition the cadenza would let an instrumentalist show off their chops. In the bel canto tradition of singing, singers would try to wow an audience even in the middle of a well orchestrated operatic work. Obviously good rock bands can jam and take extended solos, breakdowns, ad lib parts and so forth.

Frank Zappa was known for having his band rehearse several versions of dozens of songs and then working out hand signals to get the entire band to shift the feel of a song or collectively improvise based on his instructions.
#7
So in general, an original recording can be re-arranged by:

1) changing the key
2) changing the tempo/rhythm/drumbeat
3) changing the point at which certain instruments (drums and bass) enter into the song
4) changing up the guitar effects and guitar-playing techniques
5) changing the main instruments (such as in acoustic versions)
6) playing arpeggios and/or note-picking instead of following chord progressions
7) extending intro and/or outros (usually through improvisation)
8) Adding/removing/changing lyrics
9) Changing the melody
10) Changing/adding/removing harmonies
11) Changing dynamics

Are there any other ways in which an artist could re-arrange an original recording?
#8
Are there any other ways in which an artist could re-arrange an original recording?


theres reharmonization---essentially taking the melody to a song and writing new chords to it.
you can change the meter--for example take a song thats in 4/4 and put it in 7/4.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#9
you can use different versions and voicings of chords so a G major chord can be played like:


e|-3-|
b|-3-|
g|-0-|
d|-0-|
a|-2-|
e|-3-|

or

e|-10-|
b|-12-|
g|-12-|
d|-12-|
a|-10-|
e|-10-|

or

e|-15-|
b|-0--|
g|-0--|
d|-0--|
a|-14-|
e|-15-|



or instead of playing a progression that goes C F G C you can change it to go Cmaj7 Fmaj7 G7 Cmaj7 or you can go smaller to C5 F5 G5 C5

you can also rearrange them with a combination of the ideas you have up there so that they move seemlessly into another track, for example I seen coheed and cambria do this with welcome home, where they played through the solo then moved into a couple of their newer tracks (sorry I didn't have the album yet so I don't really remember which tracks they were) then hit a cover of (i think it was) the trooper by iron maiden then played second stage turbine blade and went into the outro of welcome home, and they were all intertwined perfectly, so you almost didn't even notice that they changed songs.

however more often than not I've seen bands change the tempo of songs which you also have listed there. I've seen mudvayne speed up alot of their already fast songs so they could fit more into their set, the ones I specifically remember being noticably faster than the album versions is dig and world so cold. but I also seen saliva slow down a few of thier tracks and give them a much heavier more soundgarden type feel...

also just to add on to #7 in your list, sometimes they shorten the intro or outro as well

I hope this helped!
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#10
Quote by krypticguitar87
you can use different versions and voicings of chords so a G major chord...


I like this one;



10
8
0
9
10
x

And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#11
Quote by krypticguitar87

you can also rearrange them with a combination of the ideas you have up there so that they move seemlessly into another track, for example I seen coheed and cambria do this with welcome home, where they played through the solo then moved into a couple of their newer tracks (sorry I didn't have the album yet so I don't really remember which tracks they were) then hit a cover of (i think it was) the trooper by iron maiden then played second stage turbine blade and went into the outro of welcome home, and they were all intertwined perfectly, so you almost didn't even notice that they changed songs.


I think you call that "snippeting".

During shows, Bono usually interweaves Beatles melodies either within or at the end of U2 songs.